Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX Review

Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Electric Bike Review
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Performance Line Speed Motor
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Powerpack 400 Battery
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Intuvia Bell Grips Handlebar
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx 60 Lux Headlight Suntour Suspension Fork
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bm Toplight Led Sks Fenders
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Carrymore Rear Rack Adjustable Kickstand
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx 10 Speed Shimano Deore
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Electric Bike Charger
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Electric Bike Review
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Performance Line Speed Motor
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Powerpack 400 Battery
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Intuvia Bell Grips Handlebar
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx 60 Lux Headlight Suntour Suspension Fork
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bm Toplight Led Sks Fenders
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Carrymore Rear Rack Adjustable Kickstand
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx 10 Speed Shimano Deore
Haibike Xduro Trekking S Rx Bosch Electric Bike Charger

Summary

  • A sporty, 28 mph, commuter-ready, electric bicycle made in six frame sizes across two styles, a stiffer high-step and easy approach step-thru
  • Reinforced fenders stay quiet, oversized rack with spring latch and Racktime connector, integrated LED lights with aimable 60 LUX headlight
  • Hydraulic disc brakes provide excellent stopping power, 10-speed Shimano Deore drivetrain with larger 20T chainring for high-speed cadence
  • Excellent weight distribution, removable display and battery pack with forward-compatible interface, gel saddle, and suspension fork provide comfort

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

Haibike

Model:

XDURO Trekking S RX

Price:

$4,599

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Touring, Urban, Commuting

Electric Bike Class:

Speed Pedalec (Class 3)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

5 Year Frame, 2 Year Motor and Battery

Availability:

United States

Model Year:

2016

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

53 lbs (24.04 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.4 lbs (2.44 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy, Hydroformed Tubes, Gravity Casting Interface

Frame Sizes:

17.32 in (43.99 cm)18.9 in (48 cm)20.47 in (51.99 cm)22.05 in (56 cm)23.62 in (59.99 cm)25.2 in (64 cm)Diamond (48cm, 52cm, 56cm, 60cm) Step-Thru (44cm, 48cm, 52cm)

Geometry Measurements:

32" Stand Over Height on High Step

Frame Types:

High-Step, Mid-Step

Frame Colors:

Dark Gray with Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour HESC 45-DS HLO Suspension with 65 mm Travel, Lockout, 9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

9 mm Quick Release Skewer

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses

Gearing Details:

10 Speed 1x10 Shimano Deore, 11-36T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore Triggers on Right

Cranks:

XDURO Aluminum Alloy 170 mm, 20T Sprocket with Narrow Wide Teeth and Alloy Chain Guard

Pedals:

XLC Alloy Platform, Cage Style

Headset:

FSA No. 57, Semi-Integrated, Tapered, Three 10 mm Risers

Stem:

XDURO Aluminum Alloy, A-Head, 90 mm Length

Handlebar:

XDURO Lowriser Aluminum Alloy, 29.5" Length

Brake Details:

Magura MT4 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, Magura MT4 Levers with Reach Adjust

Grips:

XLC Sport with Locking Rings

Saddle:

Selle Royale Freccia

Seat Post:

XDURO Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

31.6 mm

Rims:

RYDE 622x21c, Double Wall

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Energizer Pro, 700 x 38c

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

50 to 85 PSI, Tubeless Ready, Reflective Sidewall, Performance Line RaceGuard

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Integrated Haibike Headlight LED 60 LUX, Integrated BM Toplight LED Taillight, Carrymore Rear Rack with Spring Latch and Pannier Blockers 25 kg (55 lb) Max Weight, SKS Fenders with Rear Mud Flap, Rear Mounted Adjustable Length Kickstand, Flick Bell on Right Bar, Neoprene Slap Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack with LED Charge Level Indicator, KMC X9 Chain

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch Performance Speed

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

350 watts

Motor Peak Output:

570 watts

Motor Torque:

63 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

11 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

396 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

3.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

30 miles (48 km)

Estimated Max Range:

70 miles (113 km)

Display Type:

Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Measures Wheel Speed, Pedal Cadence and Pedal Torque - Power Output Relative to Pedal Input: Eco 40 Nm, Tour 50 Nm, Sport 55 Nm, Turbo 63 Nm)

Top Speed:

28 mph (45 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX, now called the Haibike XDURO Trekking 4.0, is an urban speed pedelec that’s geared towards commuting with integrated LED lights, a sturdy rear rack, and full-sized plastic fenders. The custom angular frame is designed to flex a bit for comfort with lower seat stays while providing a short nimble wheelbase for quick handling. Amazingly, it’s available in six frame sizes that are spread out across two frame styles. If you want the best power transfer and stiffest feel, consider the high-step as shown in the video. The mid-step is still going to be stiffer than a lot of the low-step frames seen on hybrid bikes but will be easier to mount and stand over for people with shorter inseams. Considering the rear rack position, you might find yourself making leg contact with a trunk bag if you swing your leg up and over from the rear on either model. For commuting purposes, this is an excellent platform. Not only does it offer Class 3 high-speed operation up to 28 mph assisted, it also provides comfort. The spring suspension (changed to air for 2017) pairs nicely with the gel saddle, riser stem, and low-rise handlebar to produce an upright feel. Note however, the high-pressure 700c tires, which deliver efficiency and rolling momentum. This is definitely a more aggressive urban commuter and the tires were swapped to wider Schwalbe Supermoto X for 2017 possibly to improve comfort. Weighing in at roughly 53 lbs for the 60 cm frame tested here, the bike distributes weight well, keeping the motor and battery low and centered on the frame. I’m a fan of the removable and forward compatible Bosch battery system and you get a Powerpack 400 here. The Trekking model offers integrated lights, a sturdy kickstand (that can bounce a little at high speed), quality grips, and powerful 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes from Magura. The quick release wheels and seat tube make it easy to setup, maintain, and transport, and the comprehensive 2-year warranty and vast dealer network worldwide give it a high resale value if you ever decide to upgrade.

Powering the XDURO Trekking electric bike is a Bosch Performance Line Speed motor capable of producing 63 Newton meters of torque. Rather than limiting speed to 20 mph as the standard Performance Line motor does, this one can peak out around 28 mph which is convenient for urban riding amongst automobiles. You will arrive at your destination sooner when using the Sport and Turbo modes of assist but will also drain the battery quicker due to wind resistance, which increases exponentially above ~20 mph. The motor freewheels, so you can pedal this bike unpowered without any drag, and the chainring is much smaller than a traditional bicycle because it spins 2.5 times per every crank arm revolution. There certainly a small amount of drag produced in this conversion but the smaller ring provides better chain grab and narrow-wide teeth fit snugly between the chain links to reduce drops. When the motor is active, this ring can start and stop very quickly. The 20 tooth sprocket is roughly equivalent to a standard 50 tooth chainring and pairs with a mid-level 10 speed cassette and Shimano Deore derailleur. This is a good range for the speed on offer so you won’t feel outpaced by the motor. All Bosch Performance Line motors offer shift detection and receive ongoing updates that dealers can download and install for you, which results in less drivetrain wear and an ever-improving experience. The motor on the Trekking S RX shown here protrudes a bit more than the Trekking 4.0 which is angled up and built into the downtube a bit more.

Similar styling improvements have been made for the battery interface which cups and partially surrounds the 2017 model. Haibike calls this “step-in battery concept” and it does look beautiful. I wonder how much weight the additional Aluminum plating and high-volume tires add on the latest model? At roughly 53 lbs, the Trekking S RX can become lighter if you move to a tubeless tire setup. The battery pack only weighs ~5.4 lbs and the interface is forward compatible so you could get the Powerpack 500 at some point down the line and have it work just fine. That pack weighs ~5.7 lbs but offers 25% more capacity which could be useful for commuting and high-speed riding. Both packs have an LED charge level indicator built into the left side and can be charged on or off the bike. I appreciate the looped handle piece at the top of the pack and secure locking core for protecting it on your bike if left outside. The included charger, also made by Bosch, offers 4 Amp output vs. just 2 Amps on most e-bike chargers I see. It’s relatively lightweight at under 2 lbs and compact enough that it would fit into a trunk bag or panniers easily.

Operating and controlling the ebike systems is a seamless and intuitive experience, even while riding. Simply charge and mount the battery, then press the power button at the lower left corner of the display panel. This brings the screen to life showing your current speed large and center. Above this is a battery charge level infographic with five tick marks. To the right, you’ll find an assist level readout with off, Eco, Tour, Sport, and Turbo. I tend to ride in Tour most frequently because it balances efficiency and range well, the occasional jump to Sport or Turbo will feel zippy and let you dash along with traffic or race through a straight section of pathway. Simply click up or down on the plastic button pad mounted near the left grip. This pad is within reach so that you can steer and brake unimpeded and it produces a tactile click with each press so that you can sense what’s going on without looking down at the display. The Intuvia display is faintly backlit for use in early morning or evening low-lighting conditions and can be swiveled front to back in order to reduce glare. It’s one of my favorite displays because of the styling, large display, and integrated Micro-USB port for use with a smartphone, GPS device, or other portable electronics.

I apologize for the delay in this review, the 2017 Haibike XDURO Trekking 4.0 is now available and offers some nice improvements to the Trekking S RX at roughly the same pricepoint. Both models are setup for a similar sporty-commuter experience and look great… although the Trekking 4.0 has an edge with the tighter motor and battery integration. Many shops will offer a discount on last-season products and I have found that Haibike sometimes releases new models later in the year and can have inventory stalls in the US. I enjoyed seeing this model with Chris at Propel Bikes in Brooklyn and found that it peformed well, even on the rough streets. The complaints I have include a bouncy kickstand that can produce a bit of noise at speed (though I still love this stand), a bit of motor whine at higher RPM riding, and the lack of bottle cage bosses on the seat tube. This last point may have to do with frame strength or sizing issues. The larger 60 mm frame I was on seemed to have room but the smaller sizes and mid-step design might not. Given the rear rack, there’s plenty of opportunities to use a trunk bag with bottle holster like this. If you tend to ride long distance or find that the higher speed is uncomfortable, consider adding a seat post suspension like this, but note that it will raise your minimum saddle height and could make mounting / dismounting a bit more precarious.

Pros:

  • Available in six frame sizes spread between two distinct frame designs, a traditional high-step and lower step-thru model, both are fairly active and sporty but should accommodate a wide range of rider body types
  • Wide range of gears, 10-speed Shimano Deore with a 20 tooth chainring, custom tuned for high-speed riding, you should be able to pedal comfortably up to ~28 mph
  • Reflective sidewall stripes illuminate the bike from both sides and keep you visible to automobiles, the backlight is tucked beneath the rack so trunk bags and panniers won’t obstruct it, the headlight can be aimed, it points where you steer, and is color matched to the frame, both lights run off the main battery pack for convenience and theft deterrence
  • Stylized angular frame follows the Haibike look, lower seat stays and shorter wheelbase offer comfortable but nimble handling, sloped top tube lowers the stand over height for easier dismounts
  • SKS plastic fenders keep you dry and clean, the rear fender connects to the cargo rack for strength and reduced vibration / noise
  • Large adjustable kickstand keeps the bike upright, it’s rear-mounted with plenty of space for the left crank arm to turn when parked or backing up
  • Both the display panel and battery can be quickly removed for safe keeping and off-bike charging, the battery mount interface is forward compatible with the larger Bosch Powerpack 500
  • You can charge or maintain portable electronic devices while riding with the Micro-USB port on the right edge of the Bosch Intuvia display panel, it offers 5 volts at 500 milliamps
  • High-pressure Schwalbe Energizer Pro tires can be converted to tubeless to reduce weight, overall weight of ~53 lbs is good considering the fenders and sturdy rear rack, built-in puncture protection RaceGuard liner
  • Most shifter, brake, and electronic cabling is internally routed to reduce snags, improve overall aesthetic, and make rack mounting easier, note the large rectangular plastic hole covers that make maintenance easier but keep cables clean entering and exiting the frame
  • At highs speed it’s nice to have a suspension fork and this one offers 65 mm travel and lockout, the Selle Royale gel saddle feels good and you could swap in a 31.6 mm suspension seat post for enhanced back and neck support (note that it will raise the minimum saddle height ~3 inches)
  • The Bosch drive system and controller offer shift detection to reduce drivetrain wear and provide some of the fastest response time for motor activation and cutoff that I have tested, it can operate at 120 RPM for higher cadence riding whereas some other systems cut out at 100 RPM
  • Powerful hydraulic disc brakes from Magura with large 180 mm rotors for smooth stops, adjustable reach levers fit small and large hands comfortably
  • Handsome neoprene slap guard, flick bell and locking grips, quick release wheels for easy maintenance and portability, fast and compact 4 Amp charger
  • The body position on this bike isn’t as aggressive as a traditional road bike or sport commuter, Haibike includes some risers, a steeper angled stem, and riser bars to produce a more upright body position and relax your back and neck

Cons:

  • The Bosch Performance Line motors produce a bit more noise, kind of a high pitched hum, when operating at full power or high RPM, you notice it more on smooth quiet roads
  • I like the alloy chainring protector but it doesn’t offer as much protection for your pants or dress as a full chain cover would
  • Originally priced at ~$4,500 this w asone of the more expensive electric bikes, it does offer high performance and great hardware but you pay for the brand, the dealer network, and the solid warranty, the 2017 model is priced similarly and you can usually get prior year model on sale from dealers for slightly less
  • Quick release is great if you don’t have to leave your bike parked outside at a rack all day, if you plan on commuting with the Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX then consider swapping the skewers, seat tube clamp, and headset with Pinhead hardware like this or something similar
  • The model shown in the photographs and video review above is a 2016 but the 2017 is very similar and has been upgraded with a thru-axle in the front for tighter handling and strength at high-speed
  • It really seems like there was room to add a bottle cage mounting point on the seat tube with this bike… I’m not sure why the skipped it? Even if you don’t put a water bottle there, it can be useful for mini pumps and folding locks etc.
  • The newer XDURO Trekking 4.0 has a nicer motor and battery integration, notice how the motor here is a bit rounded and sort of sticks forward and the battery is just hanging on the downtube vs. being cupped or partially integrated
  • At higher speed, the kickstand bounces a bit when riding over cracks and medium-sized bumps, you can hear it knocking and jittering a bit in the video review around 20:55
  • The rear rack uses oversized tubing which means that standard clip-on panniers won’t work or will need to have the clips replaced with 20 mm hardware like this, also, in the United States it seems like there are very few accessories available for use with the CarryMore slide in system
  • Many owners have reported that the front light can fall off easily and will dangle next to the fender, it sounds like the hardware just comes loose, consider using LocTite or just keeping a close eye on this part
  • The lights are wonderful but as with many integrated rear lights, there isn’t a flash mode, some owners have opted for aftermarket lights to generate more attention with flash

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More Haibike Reviews

Haibike XDURO AllMtn 8.0 Review

  • MSRP: $6,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

The highest specced all mountain electric model from Haibike, longer 150 mm travel on front and rear air suspension by Magura and Fox paired with a steeper fork angle and plus sized tires let you handle most terrain. Premium Magura hydraulic disc brakes 203/180 size with adjustable lightweight carbon levers and quad piston…...

Haibike SDURO HardFour 4.0 Review

  • MSRP: $2,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A high performance, purpose built electric mountain bike for kids or petite adults... but mostly kids! Limited top speed of 15 mph for safety, full 9-speed Shimano drivetrain. Capable 160 mm hydraulic disc brakes with adjustable-reach levers for smaller hands, only available in…...

Haibike SDURO HardNine 4.0 Review

  • MSRP: $2,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

One of the most affordable Haibikes in the line, available in four frame sizes, relatively lightweight, large 29er tires provide float and momentum at speed for cross country riding. Very capable mid-drive system (the same motor and battery as some higher-priced Haibike models), zero…...

Haibike XDURO FullSeven Carbon Ultimate Review

  • MSRP: $16,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A high-performance electric mountain bike available in four frame sizes, stiff carbon frame for improved power transfer and handling, carbon accents include seat post, saddle, handlebar, wheelset and more. Eleven speed Shimano Deore XTR drivetrain with Di2 electronic shifting for faster, more precise gear…...

Haibike SDURO AllMtn 6.0 Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A trail worthy, full suspension electric mountain bike with stiff lightweight frame construction, optimized suspension and a tightly integrated mid-drive motor from Yamaha. Upgraded 500 watt hour battery pack delivers 60+ miles on medium assist, powerful hydraulic disc…...

Haibike SDURO ALLMTN Plus Review

  • MSRP: $4,899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautiful and capable all mountain style ebike with premium components from Schwalbe, Shimano, Magura and RockShox, the frame, fork and saddle are paint matched. The drive system is surprisingly powerful, delivering 80 Newton meters of peak torque output, it…...

Haibike XDURO Urban S RX Review

  • MSRP: $5,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A high speed road bike with electric assist up to 28 mph (45 km/h), available in five frame sizes for improved fit and a vibration dampening seat post and shock stem for improved comfort. Efficient low-resistance tires with deep-dish aero rims and bladed spokes, keep the tire pressure up…...

Haibike SDURO Full FatSix Review

  • MSRP: $5,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

One of the only full suspension fat electric bikes I've seen, quality hardware including 20 speed Shimano Deore XT drivetrain, solid 2 year motor and battery warranty with 5 years on the frame. Powered by the Yamaha mid-drive ebike system with 500 watt motor, Zero Cadence pedal assist,…...

Haibike SDURO FullNine RX Review

  • MSRP: $4,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A full suspension 29er with mid-drive motor, slim battery and removable display by Yamaha, offers 80 Nm of torque and zero-cadence pedal assist response. The RX trim level is top of the line with light weight hardware from Shimano,…...

Haibike SDURO ALLMTN RC Review

  • MSRP: $4,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An all mountain trail + downhill mid drive powered electric bike with 150 mm air suspension, rigid thru axles (15 mm front 142 x 12 mm rear). Impressive 20 speed drivetrain with quality Shimano Deore XT groupset, capable Shimano M615 hydraulic disc…...

Haibike XDURO DWNHLL Pro Review

  • MSRP: $8,899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

One of the only true downhill ready electric bikes being made in series production, delivers a worldcup ready chassis and pro level components. Shimano Saint drivetrain and brakes (top of the line downhill groupset), with two piece Ice-Tech…...

Haibike XDURO FullLife RX Review

  • MSRP: $5,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

Custom geometry with shorter reach to accommodate women (who tend to have shorter arms and torso but longer legs), shorter saddle with wider back, adjustable position brake levers for smaller hands. plush 120 mm front and rear Fox air suspension with 15 mm thru-axle front and…...

Haibike SDURO HardSeven SM Review

  • MSRP: $2,499
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

The most affordable Haibike in the 2016 line, features the Yamaha drive system with a basic fixed LED display console, basic saddle, heavier oil suspension fork and cheaper Kenda tires without liners. Solid nine-speed SRAM X-4 drivetrain, no shift sensing or motor inhibitors, large 180 mm hydraulic…...

Haibike SDURO HardLife SL Review

  • MSRP: $2,799
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

The most affordable women's specific electric bike from Haibike, leverages the Yamaha mid-drive, features an upgraded LCD screen with USB charging port. Excellent weight distribution, battery and motor are mounted low and center, the top tube is…...

Haibike XDURO Fullseven RX Review

  • MSRP: $5,500
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

A high performance full suspension electric mountain bike with quality components from Shimano, RockShox, and Fox. Responsive, durable and intuitive drive systems powered by Bosch, solid two year comprehensive warranty, five…...

Haibike XDURO AMT RX Review

  • MSRP: $6,350
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014, 2015

A high performance all-mountain electric bike with premium suspension from Fox and hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano. Thru axles on front and rear wheel for improved stiffness and durability, seat post dropper…...

Haibike XDURO Nduro Pro Review

  • MSRP: $9,100
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

Premium downhill capable electric bike with 180 mm travel on front and rear Fox air suspension, available in four frame sizes for improved fit. Excellent weight distribution, Bosch-made Centerdrive motor and battery kept low and center on the frame,…...

Haibike XDURO Trekking Pro Review

  • MSRP: $4,650
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

A long-range capable touring our commuting style electric bike that climbs well, has a balanced weight distribution and offers 27 speeds for a steady cadence at most speeds. Excellent accessories including LED lights, full-length fenders and sturdy rear-rack with spring latch...

Haibike XDURO Nduro RX

  • MSRP: $7,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

The entry-level performance downhill electric bike from Haibike with 26" wheels , long travel 180 mm air suspension by Fox with CTD adjust and hydraulic Shimano SLX disc brakes. Excellent frame balance with motor and battery mounted low and center, quick release wheels with…...

Haibike XDURO Urban Review

  • MSRP: $4,450
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

An efficient, light weight road style electric bike with a perfectly balanced all-aluminum frame and electric drive system. Convenient quick release wheels, integrated LED lights, quality hydraulic disc brakes and a removable battery…...

Haibike XDURO Fatsix Review

  • MSRP: $5,800
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

The only Bosch powered electric fat bike I've seen with a suspension fork, RockShox air with remote lockout. Burly 15 mm front and 12 mm rear thru axles, extended bottom bracket and spindle…...

Haibike XDURO Race Review

  • MSRP: $6,700
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

An extremely well balanced, light weight, high speed electric road bike - one of the only ebikes with drop bars that I've seen. Efficient centerdrive from Bosch can reach speeds of 28 mph and distance in excess of…...

Haibike XDURO FS RX 27.5″ Review

  • MSRP: $4,900
  • MODEL YEAR: 2015

High performance, well balanced, full suspension electric mountain bike with motor and battery kept low and center. Available in four frame sizes for good fit, larger 27.5" wheels improve traction, momentum and…...

Haibike XDURO RX 29″ Review

  • MSRP: $4,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Capable and sturdy eMountain bike with great frame balance, motor and battery (mounted low and center). Available in four frame sizes for good fit, large 29" wheels provide improved traction, momentum…...

Haibike XDURO Trekking RX Review

  • MSRP: $4,000
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Ultra efficient centerdrive motor leverages nine speed cassette and three speed SRAM hub for climbing and distance. Top of the line commuting accessories including dynamo powered LED lights, rear rack with pump,…...

Haibike XDURO Superrace Review

  • MSRP: $7,800
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

One of the lightest weight, most efficient and fastest riding electric road bikes available. Premium components including Magura MT4 hydraulic disc brakes, Integrated LED lights and SRAM X0 drivetrain...

Haibike XDURO AMT Pro Review

  • MSRP: $7,800
  • MODEL YEAR: 2014

Top of the line all mountain style electric bike with full suspension and middrive motor. Light weight, high end frame and components keep bike under 50 pounds...


Richard Coers
6 months ago

I put a small piece of 1/8″ thick adhesive backed foam on the flat riding surface of the kick stand. No more noise! Used to bug the hell out of me. 600 miles now, no other issues.

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Great tip Richard, thanks for sharing ;)

Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Johnny
1 week ago

Awesome - thanks for the incredible write up. You've convinced me to steer clear of the yamaha drives for the time being. Which of course means that I would need to step up to a Xduro treekking for significant more money.

Local dealer just called and offered a 2017 Haibiki Xduro Trekking S (bosch speed powered) for $3200. Hmm ... I think I might be able to do a tad better if I wait a bit longer ..

Still very much worried about buying the IZIP via remote dealer, having an issue and then being stranded without local dealer support. Even though the price is very attractive. It seems like even if I don't buy the IZIP from the local dealer, they may still be able to / obligated to help with IZIP warranty work? The Xduro 5.0 sure is tempting, but it a bit overkill for my current needs.

Anybody knows where the op got this deal ? I think $3200 is a good deal for 2017 Xduro Trekking S (especially if it is otd).

I am leaning towards 2017 Xduro fullseven though and if there is a similar offer I really would love to get one(I actually would get trekking S if it is possible to take it to the trails too).

Mark Peralta
1 week ago

I used the Nuvinci + Bosch Performance combo for a month (replacement bike) and have also used the Bosch Performance drive with a cassette when I swapped e-bikes for a weekend with a colleague. Both e-bikes were 28mph iterations. The N380 bike was a Swiss made Flyer, whereas the 'cassette bike' was a Haibike Trekking Xduro S 5.0.

To answer your question, the cassette has a wider range of gears. I'll spare you the ratio math and simply narrate my experience. With the Nuvinci N380 I had trouble climbing hills above 12% grade and I even managed to stall a couple of times around 15% grade. With the cassette driven Haibike, I climbed an average 18% grade hill containing a short but steeper 22% grade section. It was tough but still doable. I weigh 220 pounds and am moderately fit.

I could not tell you exactly at what percentage grade you will start having trouble with the N380 because that depends on your fitness level and weight. But if you frequently need to climb hills above 12%, I would recommend staying with the cassette. Otherwise the N380 iteration will be more a lot more fun to ride.

A tip if you get the N380: you can easily shift to a lower gear ratio under load going uphill. But it's sometimes more difficult to twist 'to a higher gear' when gaining speed. The trick is to back off pedalling for a second whilst you shift. It makes the experience a lot easier on the hands if you tend to get blisters. This was the main issue I encountered.
If the chain ring is 3 speed just like what Yamaha uses on their ebikes, then using a nuvinci would be adequate even on steeper hills. Unfortunately, Bosch only uses single chain ring and the trend for nuvinci is to use belt drive, eliminating the feasibility of multiple speed chain ring.

JayVee
1 week ago

All other things being equal, which would be the better hill climber and to what degree is the difference? I'm referring to the Super Commuter 8 which has a rear cassette assembly, vs the Super Commuter 9 which has the Nuvinci internal gears. I guess I'm asking which has the lowest gear, or are they equal?
Thanks,
Rich

I used the Nuvinci + Bosch Performance combo for a month (replacement bike) and have also used the Bosch Performance drive with a cassette when I swapped e-bikes for a weekend with a colleague. Both e-bikes were 28mph iterations. The N380 bike was a Swiss made Flyer, whereas the 'cassette bike' was a Haibike Trekking Xduro S 5.0.

To answer your question, the cassette has a wider range of gears. I'll spare you the ratio math and simply narrate my experience. With the Nuvinci N380 I had trouble climbing hills above 12% grade and I even managed to stall a couple of times around 15% grade. With the cassette driven Haibike, I climbed an average 18% grade hill containing a short but steeper 22% grade section. It was tough but still doable. I weigh 220 pounds and am moderately fit.

I could not tell you exactly at what percentage grade you will start having trouble with the N380 because that depends on your fitness level and weight. But if you frequently need to climb hills above 12%, I would recommend staying with the cassette. Otherwise the N380 iteration will be more a lot more fun to ride.

A tip if you get the N380: you can easily shift to a lower gear ratio under load going uphill. But it's sometimes more difficult to twist 'to a higher gear' when gaining speed. The trick is to back off pedalling for a second whilst you shift. It makes the experience a lot easier on the hands if you tend to get blisters. This was the main issue I encountered.

JayVee
1 week ago

Just a comment for those looking to understand Haibike Trekking frame sizes. I have the Trekking Sduro S 6.0 which has the same frame as the Bosch powered Trekking Xduro 5.0 from what I can see. It is however different to the 4.0 as explained by Ravi above.

An addition to what I said earlier in this thread. I have size S (52) but there are 2 additional spacers above the stem. I'm pretty sure that they were added by the shop where I bought the bike. This raises the handlebar height by about 3 cms. I measure 1m82-83.

Johnny
1 week ago

@Dewey: Again thanks for the info, I didn't know that Giant customized their motors. Again when I was looking into the specifications I did not see much information about the motor. It seems Explore uses a version that is speed limited to 20, yet I see 28 mph version of the same "sport " model.

I'm a huge Haibike fan, I own two 2016 bikes. A Full Seven XDURO S RX mtb, and a Trekking XDURO S RX. Both are speed versions, 28mph, both are Bosch. You get a little noise from the Bosch mid drive (as compared to the Brose for example), but it's so smooth in handling power and torque. Personally, I feel the Bosch is worth every penny. If you ride many hills, you'll appreciate the 28mph bikes. When riding a 20mph bike, you go over that coming down the grade. But when you get to that 20mph setting as you level out, you can feel it hunt between assist and no assist. With the 28mph, you just don't hit that annoyance. Right now is the perfect time to buy a Haibike. I bought one in November 2016 and the other in March 2017. Both highly discounted from MSRP.

Thanks for the response, so you advise going for a 2017 x duro instead of an sduro ? I realize that for some models they did not state the maxspeed but should I assume that it is 28mph if the system is 350w Bosch CX ?
I think at some place that Bosch system will not accept other battery packs (and I see that Bosch insanely overprices their packs ) is it still the case?

I should find a shop and test these models.

rich c
1 week ago

I'm a huge Haibike fan, I own two 2016 bikes. A Full Seven XDURO S RX mtb, and a Trekking XDURO S RX. Both are speed versions, 28mph, both are Bosch. You get a little noise from the Bosch mid drive (as compared to the Brose for example), but it's so smooth in handling power and torque. Personally, I feel the Bosch is worth every penny. If you ride many hills, you'll appreciate the 28mph bikes. When riding a 20mph bike, you go over that coming down the grade. But when you get to that 20mph setting as you level out, you can feel it hunt between assist and no assist. With the 28mph, you just don't hit that annoyance. Right now is the perfect time to buy a Haibike. I bought one in November 2016 and the other in March 2017. Both highly discounted from MSRP.

hurricane56
2 weeks ago

Awesome - thanks for the incredible write up. You've convinced me to steer clear of the yamaha drives for the time being. Which of course means that I would need to step up to a Xduro treekking for significant more money.

Local dealer just called and offered a 2017 Haibiki Xduro Trekking S (bosch speed powered) for $3200. Hmm ... I think I might be able to do a tad better if I wait a bit longer ..

Still very much worried about buying the IZIP via remote dealer, having an issue and then being stranded without local dealer support. Even though the price is very attractive. It seems like even if I don't buy the IZIP from the local dealer, they may still be able to / obligated to help with IZIP warranty work? The Xduro 5.0 sure is tempting, but it a bit overkill for my current needs.

The service portion is something you'll need to check with the iZip. Just as an example, my friend with a Bulls bike had to pay the LBS a diagnostic fee to initiate a warranty claim on his Bosch powerpack 400. He did not buy the bike at the LBS. This is the one grey zone with many ebike service experiences, it probably varies widely amongst manufacturer and LBS. Even my local dealer where I purchased the bike from has to charge for labor on a warranty parts replacement. The last time I had a repair done they were kind enough to waive the fee, but were upfront about disclosing that before work commenced. I'm guessing Haibike does not compensate the LBS for their time. If you do inquire with the iZip people, you'll also want to ask if the TransX takes software updates and if that would result in a dealer service fee as well.

Ravi Kempaiah
2 weeks ago

My bike is powered by Bosch Performance Line. Seems you all have gotten many more miles on your chain.
I didn't have any issues with the chain and derailleur but constant noise from the chain when pedaling. At first I would clean and lube the chain and it would quiet down but after maybe 50 miles or so it would be noisy again. Switched from dry lube to ChainL with the same results. And the last attempt or so to lube and quiet the chain was unsuccessful, still noisy after the lube.
While in the shop for the new chain the Sprocket Equalizing System (S.E.S) bearing was replaced as it exhibited some binding as it rotated. It was replaced with an upgraded ceramic bearing.
I would say my riding is not severe at all, mostly smooth paved bike paths and an occasional stretch of dirt path.
I do try to keep the bike and all its running gear clean and well lubed. I hope this eBike specific chain will outlast the original Shimano.

Have you cleaned the complete drive train?
Like the chaining, cassette, derailleur etc.

I am amazed that people get less than 1000 miles on their chain. I don't do off-road stuff but mostly on-road. Chicago winters are harsh and in the last 14 months, I put ~5000 miles on my Xduro Trekking Speed bike and had to replace the chain only around 4000 miles. Granted, I never the use Turbo, 99% Tour mode and I clean and lube the drive train every 250 miles.

Bryan995
2 weeks ago

1. The drive has a tendency to resist your efforts above a certain RPM level, and the cadence window in which it provides power is pretty limited. This is perceptible in Standard mode, and painfully perceptible in ECO and ECO+ modes.

This has several consequences:

- If you want to tour around in a hilly area, you need to be really fit with the Yamaha. I use ECO mode only when absolutely needed. The Bosch and Shimano ECO modes are infinitely easier on the knees.

- If you want to climb a hill, the lowest gears might not necessarily be the best gears. If you're spinning away in 1st gear you will quickly hit a cadence where power drops off. This means you'll need to shift up a gear or two to get power. But it also means that climbing will be more difficult on the knees (once again). I climb a 7% grade incline every day and the bike is in 8th or 9th gear (meaning, 2-3 gears away from 11 teeth). I hand't noticed this until someone remarked that I was climbing in a really high gear. Might explain why my knees ache sometimes...

- Because the cadence is limited, the bike requires an inordinate number of gear shifts in traffic. Think of a scenario where you have several consecutive red lights. After the first red light goes green, I need to shift up 6 times to reach cruising speed. But as soon as I reach cruising speed, I have to shift down several times as well. And start over at each red light. Other drives, like the Bosch or the Shimano have a more intelligent way of dealing with this. Start in 1st gear and shift into second or third gear, then increase the number of RPMs instead of shifting through all the gears. You'll get just as much power and won't constantly be changing gears.

2. The engineering on some of the parts isn't up to Yamaha standards.

- The remote is fastened by screws which “bite” into the plastic casing. The result is that it’s impossible to tighten them so that the remote doesn’t swivel around the handlebars. This means that it’s nearly impossible to walk the bike up a hill using RUN mode. Press on the RUN button and the remote simply swivels out of your hand.

-The bike’s remote is designed in such a manner that you have to take your right hand off the handlebars in order to switch to another level of assist. But the remote often slips away...

- The button to power on the bike is starting to fail. Sometimes it works, sometimes not.

- The diagnostic button on the battery sometimes doesn't work.

3. Although not directly Yamaha's fault, the lighting on many Trekking Sduros is not sufficient for riding in the countryside at night. I have a Trekking Sduro S 6.0 which has a 60 lux light. When riding in the forest at night I can't see the contours of the road ahead. This is because the projected beam is too narrow and the lights not powerful enough.

So, if I had to do it again, I wouldn't buy a Yamaha powered bike. This is particularly true of the older PW drive system, which still equips most SDUROs.

Awesome - thanks for the incredible write up. You've convinced me to steer clear of the yamaha drives for the time being. Which of course means that I would need to step up to a Xduro treekking for significant more money.

Local dealer just called and offered a 2017 Haibiki Xduro Trekking S (bosch speed powered) for $3200. Hmm ... I think I might be able to do a tad better if I wait a bit longer ..

Still very much worried about buying the IZIP via remote dealer, having an issue and then being stranded without local dealer support. Even though the price is very attractive. It seems like even if I don't buy the IZIP from the local dealer, they may still be able to / obligated to help with IZIP warranty work? The Xduro 5.0 sure is tempting, but it a bit overkill for my current needs.

Over50
2 weeks ago

... Will have to call for pricing but I have a feeling the Xduro trekking may be closer to 3k?...
In that case is it worth the 2x price increase over the IZIP? If the haibike will hold its value more so than the IZIP then I have no issue paying a bit more now. But if in 4 years both are down to $500 resale then the IZIP seems like the way to go. Thanks for the help!

I was seeing the Xduro prices yesterday of about $3500. Maybe they will come down more. But I like your thinking. If you're testing the waters and think you might upgrade in a few years - and particularly because your commute is shorter - then the IZIP sounds like a great way to go (although I don't have experience with IZIP). It would be nice if you could find a local dealer for that IZIP however. You'd definitely want to test it out.

Bryan995
2 weeks ago

Just for reference my Trekking S Xduro was $2699 during last years clearance.

As for resale the Haibike might have an edge but seeing resale ads for ebikes here in the SF Bay Area, many bikes are posted for sale at 40-50% off the original sale price after less than a year. I’d recommend buying the bike that fits your needs now and not factor in resale.

Perfect - appreciate that data point. Best I can find for the Sduro trekking 4.0 is $1999, so $700 more for the Xduro seems reasonable. Still need to do a bit more searching around re. best pricing. I am down in SD.

hurricane56
2 weeks ago

Just for reference my Trekking S Xduro was $2699 during last years clearance.

As for resale the Haibike might have an edge but seeing resale ads for ebikes here in the SF Bay Area, many bikes are posted for sale at 40-50% off the original sale price after less than a year. I’d recommend buying the bike that fits your needs now and not factor in resale.

Bryan995
2 weeks ago

Actually the poster didn't specify Xduro or Sduro (unless I missed it) but I guess based on the price quoted it has to be Sduro. But both are discounted pretty heavily right now so Xduro would be a good suggestion. Perhaps the prices will come down even more as we get to year end. So the commute sounds very short but with a large hill. The Bosch CX will power up that hill and since the distance is short range will not be an issue.

Yes sorry all. I was refering to the Sduro Trekking 4.0 with Yamaha PW not the Bosch powered Xduro. Everything I read says to go Bosch and it seems like you all echo that :).

Will have to call for pricing but I have a feeling the Xduro trekking may be closer to 3k?

In that case is it worth the 2x price increase over the IZIP? If the haibike will hold its value more so than the IZIP then I have no issue paying a bit more now. But if in 4 years both are down to $500 resale then the IZIP seems like the way to go. Thanks for the help!

Over50
2 weeks ago

@Over50 owns a Trekking 4.0.

His experiences are described in the thread below:

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/over-50s-2017-xduro-trekking-4-0-chronicles.13845/

Actually the poster didn't specify Xduro or Sduro (unless I missed it) but I guess based on the price quoted it has to be Sduro. But both are discounted pretty heavily right now so Xduro would be a good suggestion. Perhaps the prices will come down even more as we get to year end. So the commute sounds very short but with a large hill. The Bosch CX will power up that hill and since the distance is short range will not be an issue.

JayVee
2 weeks ago

@Over50 owns a Trekking 4.0.

His experiences are described in the thread below:

https://electricbikereview.com/forum/threads/over-50s-2017-xduro-trekking-4-0-chronicles.13845/

rich c
4 weeks ago

I upgraded to the 500whr on the 2016 XDURO S RX Trekking I bought this spring. $300 swap out when everything was brand new. So I swap the 400 and 500 back and forth between the XDURO Full Seven S RX and the Trekking S RX. I've gone 55 miles on the 500 pack with 2 bars showing on the Trekking. Heck of a way to get a second pack, but buying a 2016 in March 2017 was a real bargain!

Over50
4 weeks ago

...I did find that both bikes seemed more difficult to pedal above the 2O mph limit compared to the Brose, Yamaha and Shimano bikes which I also have limited experience test riding ... The bikes I rode it seemed like the motor cut off in the 18 mph range ...

My experience with my Haibike XDuro Trekking 4.0 with the CX motor: it cuts off somewhere between 19.5 and 19.8 MPH consistently and it is so smooth I can't even really detect it except for the fact that I feel some increased resistance. There is no noise or jerking of the motor to indicate shutoff or restart. But if I want to increase my speed past 20 mph - it is really difficult. On flat ground, I can actually obtain higher speeds (with less effort after 20 mph) on my human powered Spot Champa (Alfine 8 speed). I can consistently max out around 23 mph on my human powered bike (without killing myself) whereas it takes a lot more effort to hit that on my Haibike. Of course the Spot is a lot lighter. In my commuting on the Haibike, I've concluded it is counter-productive to let the motor cutout with the intent to increase my speed - say to catch a green light. Counter-productive because the amount of energy I have to expend for that extra 1 or 2 mph really isn't worth it. I've really stopped trying to push the bike past 20 and have become accustomed to cruising around 18-19 and making my time with the jack-rabbit acceleration of the CX motor from the stops. Ultimately I'd level high praise at the CX motor for two things: 1). the smooth and powerful acceleration up to the cutoff and 2). the smooth, almost undetectable cutoff of the motor approaching 20 mph. The negative is pedaling the bike over 20 mph - really difficult to do on a flat.

bob armani
1 month ago

There seems to be an error on Haibike's website. The new Trekking Xduro S 9.0 is depicted with the same frame as for 2017 (shown in the picture below). But the spec sheet mentions an IBC (Intube Battery Concept) frame coupled with a traditional Power Pack. So something doesn't quite add up. If you have an intube frame, it would make sense to ship with an intube battery. Either the image is wrong or the spec sheet is wrong. Unfortunately, I suspect the image is correct and the stated specs are wrong.

Link: https://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/695/2018-xduro-trekking-s-9-0?variant=3840424848

The picture on the website:

The accompanying description:

However, an Intube frame should look like this:

Edit: Checked it. The spec sheet is wrong on Haibike's website. The 2018 Trekking S-Pedelec model is basically the same as the 2017 model (meaning no Intube battery). The 2018 model is shown at 2:37 in this video:

Yeah, I see what you are referring to in 2.37. No IBC on the frame. So many models to choose from; just another way to confuse the consumer with almost too many models. I personally like the IBC on any model of an ebike to stay with the stealthy looks. Great move for Haibike, but long overdue IMHO! I assume most/all of the Yamaha models in the video have the new PBX motor?? Great video though for many new models to look forward to giving test rides and possible purchase! FUN!

rich c
1 month ago

Fall colors finally showing in the Illinois River Valley, in Peoria Heights, IL. Haibike 2016 XDURO Trekking S RX.

1/1
Over50
2 months ago

@Over50, Haibike was the first who put the Bosch first generation drive unit into the mountain bikes in 2011...

Thanks Wildtrak. I don't currently do any off-road riding but I'm city commuting on a Haibike XDuro 4.0 Trekking and a R&M Charger (Nuvinci speed pedelec). I'm thinking that if all goes well mid-2018 I'd like to upgrade one of those bikes for a dual-battery capacity commuter. It appears the Haibike Sduro Trekking 9.0 for 2018 is basically the same bike as the XDuro 4.0 (frame and components) but allows for dual-battery with their new rail system and in-tube design. I definitely have my eye on the Trekking 9.0 but I'm also attracted to the Moustache Samedi and XRoads models (hidden battery but not dual-battery). As for a speed pedelec choice I have my eyes on the New Charger by R&M and the Bulls full suspension commuter the Six50 TR Street. Also, I'm pretty certain I'm also going to buy the Tern GSD as a grocery hauler/wife's bike/day tripper. So 2 new bikes for 2018 is the plan: the Tern GSD and a commuter replacement bike (Haibike, R&M or Bulls most likely). For the German brands that sell Bosch powered commuter bikes in the USA, it looks like they use similar specs/components but do you have an opinion coming from Germany, about which brand is better in terms of overall quality, customer service/support and innovation?

rich c
2 months ago

Posting your inquiry in the Forum Rules and Etiquette is going to limit responses, so maybe ask the admin to move it. I ride 3 different ebikes. I've ridden 1700 miles on a cheap Sondors fat bike, owned it for 19 months. The motor is getting a rattle in it. It's a known issue with that motor that the glue fails on the magnets, so will be opening it up to epoxy them back in soon. Also getting close to needing brake pads. I'm coming up on one year on a Haibike XDURO Full Seven S RX mountain bike. 1600+ miles on it since last November, no issues. Almost 1,200 miles on a Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX, no issues. I highly recommend Haibikes, but you would have to add all the mileage on 3 bikes to come close to the mileage you may be talking about.

rich c
2 months ago

For a commuter, I would prefer a class III bike, capable of 28mph. I hardly ever ride that fast, but really often hit 22-23mph. Also much prefer hydraulic brakes, not familiar with the brakes spec'd on the Voltbike. I'd consider that Voltbike a little short on gears, but since it has a throttle, you may be okay. Don't know the size of your children, but loaded down you may like a lower gear that you get with the 7. My Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX has 10. The price is very attractive on that Voltbike, but if I depended on my bike to get to work, I'd want a better class of components. Just a lot of my preferences here, but I started on a cheap Chinese eBike, but really only ride Haibike XDURO (Bosch mid drive) bikes now. Two of my eBikes are over 1600 miles, the Trekking is over 1100 miles. Just a bit of reference for my riding experience. Edit; If you want both kids to ride, look at a GSD cargo bike. You should also look at Thudbuster or Bodyfloat suspension seat posts with the style bike you are looking at.

rich c
2 months ago

This time of year you can almost get a Haibike XDURO Trekking for $3000. 50 miles a day is achievable with the 400whr Bosch. Get one with a 500whr and you get 75+ miles.

Mark Adams
2 months ago

I ride three different kinds of eBikes, Sondors Fat bike, Haibike XDURO Full Seven S RX, and a Haibike XDURO Trekking S RX. I have over 1000 miles on the Trekking, over 1500 miles on the Sondors and Full Seven. The fat bike was my first ebike, found it on Craigslist. It has been relegated to snow and an occasional ride on a crushed rock rail trail. It rides like an old Jeep. Heavy physical weight and heavy response. You have to actually put effort into the handlebars to turn the bike. Those wide tires do not make for a nimble bike. Huge rolling resistance in the tires. The Trekking bike can be ridden on a gravel road, but much better suited for touring on pavement. The small tires do not make for a fun ride on the gravel. I would not take it into rock and tree roots. The full suspension mountain bike will go anywhere. It was a demo model, and came with Schwalbe Super Moto-X 27.5 x 2.4 tires. For me, this is the ideal go anywhere bike. The smoother tread pattern on the Super Moto-X is great on pavement, and by letting out a few psi they really grip on dry single trails. It will climb a really steep incline with the 11 gear cassette. The full suspension makes riding great for my 65 year old body, on any conditions. Rough city streets, gravel, or trails with rocks and roots, are all smoothed out in the ride. I now see no need for any bike with tires over the 2.4".
I don’t feel the fat tire is that cumbersome. But have not ridden a Sondors also have a Surly pugsly fat and my regular Mt bike sits most of the time . But everything is a trade off so best answer is a nice quiver of rides to choose from.

Joseph Gizzi Jr
2 months ago

Court how tall re you? I am considering the ‘18 model, the Trekking 9.5. I am 6ft 2in and noticed you were riding a large. Beyond that might be too big. Nice review as always.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Thanks Joseph! I am 5'9" and weigh 135 lbs with a ~30" inseam

calvin cooke
3 months ago

Top speed on this model....It's either one of these or the giant e bike that does 28mph

You Toober
4 months ago

@ 3:29 - You would be a FOOL to park a bike like that at a public bike rack.

chrispark11
6 months ago

Cool bike, but $4,600!!! These bikes will remain totally niche until these prices get real. I hope they sell NONE of them and they learn their lesson about being greedy and overpriced. Sheesh!

Howard Nelson
6 months ago

First off, great job Cort with your reviews. I found them about a year ago and watching them was instrumental in turning my curiosity into a desire which I acted on this past March. I was waiting for you to review this bike, but got anxious to pull the trigger in December. Unfortunately, the $3k closeout units were all sold out in my size but a local dealer cut me a pretty good deal on the 2017 5.0 model which has the 500 Wh battery. I had to wait until March, but I feel like it was worth it. I have about 800 miles on it now, all from commuting a few times to work here in San Diego. It's about 20 miles each way (Vista to Rancho Bernardo) and it takes me just over an hour. I average right around 20 mph +_ .5 mph. I ride mostly in Sport mode, with a little at Tour and Turbo mixed and the battery just drops to 2 bars within a mile of my destination so I figure about 32 mile range for my riding style and route (800 ft climbing). I typically cruise in the 23-26 mph range and climb in the 17-20 mph range. so far the only real complaint I have is the front fender tends to rattle a far amount and tthe rear light harness was coming loose until I tightend the connectors. I find the ride very comfortabe with no need to add a suspension seat post, but I am used to my road bike seat which I still ride 50-100 miles per week. I think my riding has gotten stronger since I got my Haibike as I still get a good workout on my ebike and i am riding more total miles per week.

I will keep you posted of any significant new insights or issues.
Todd

frank doster
6 months ago

wonderful for a guy like me, because of vision cannot drive.. I commute to work by bicycle daily. Thanks 22 miles on turbo, good range

Martian Megafauna
6 months ago

On tire width: "...for the electric bike world..." I like that this Haibike IS more of a bicycle than an e-motorcycle.
I am glad that there is a wide range of ebikes produced, from a standard bike with a hub motor all the way up to 60+ lb. battle-bikes that would be suitable for Mad Max. I get it that e-power permits you to push the extra mass and friction of huge tires and overbuilt frames, and that at higher speeds some ebike riders will be grateful for the e-moto nature of their ride.
However, regular bikes can go fast and take a beating too--think Paris-Roubaix.
We shouldn't think that because an ebike leans one way or the other that it is not up to 'standards'.

Back to the tires: those Haibike tires are wide and tough enough for all but hellish road conditions. MTB tires were of similar width not long ago, and these Schwalbe tires are more durable than they were. On the same roads that ebikers will ride these Haibikes there will be numerous old school bicycle riders on narrow 700x25 tires, and those poor folks will be doing just fine. And some will ride just as fast as the Haibikers. You don't necessarily need armored oversized tires, battle-ready frames, or full suspension on an ebike, but it is nice that there is a choice for those that want or need it.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Well said, the space has evolved and there is a new "regular" which some people appreciate, I call it out only to explain the evolution and norm, like with the 2017 model. And, as someone with a sensitive back and neck, I prefer the larger tires for comfort. I'll try to make that my own vs. generalizing when I speak :)

Lynn Recker
6 months ago

Two things..... doesn't the 2017 model have fatter tires on 27.5 inch rims, and second, does Chris ever wear the same helmet twice in your vids?

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Ha! Yeah, that's a great question... I think he likes experimenting with different gear when we go out. And yeah, the tires on the 2017 model are much fatter. I think you may be correct about the 27.5" rims as well but I haven't seen that model in person yet to confirm, just going off of their official specs at http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/364/2017-xduro-trekking-4-0?variant=3857211748#specs which says 62-584 which equates to 27.5" x 2.4"

readyplayer2
6 months ago

I've had the 2016 SDURO Trekking RC for about 4 months. It uses a Yamaha motor vs. Bosch, and is Class 1 (20mph limit on motor assistance) vs Class 3 (28mph). Otherwise, the 2016 XDURO and SDURO models are near identical. I primarily use it for commuting (17-18 miles round trip with several steep and long hill climbs). I'm extremely happy with the build quality and the bike in general. I don't think you could go wrong with a Haibike.

Of course, there's always room for improvement. One minor annoyance is the rack. The oversized rack tubing, while sturdy, means those wishing to use Ortlieb panniers will need to purchase 20mm replacements for the top hooks / clips -- https://ortliebusa.com/product/ql2-1-20mm-top-hooks-e193/. And accessories for the CarryMore rack are all but unavailable in the USA, making the fancy spring loaded clip system useless.

Despite snugging the screw tightly during assembly, the front light fell off on one of the first rides and was dangling next to the fender. The EBR forums indicate this is a frequent occurrence. I'd love a setting where the lights come on automatically, and it would be great to be able to set the rear light to flash. The steady red light is not attention-getting enough for urban use on streets at dusk, so I've added a Planetbike Superflash to the seat post.

Those are literally my only complaints or suggestions for improvement. This is an awesome bike. The add-ons I've made have been the flashing rear light, Ortlieb Sport Packer Plus panniers, Ergon GP-1 ergonomic handgrips, and a BodyFloat suspension seat post.

readyplayer2
6 months ago

Of course, please feel free! I was trying to give back in some small way, I have found ElectricBikeReview.com to be absolutely invaluable both for pre-purchase research and for support with fellow owners on the forum. I honestly can't thank you enough for all the work you do.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

This is excellent feedback! I'm going to share some of it in the full review writeup I did if you don't mind. Thanks for taking the time to share so much :)

CLOTHED IN SHADOWS.
6 months ago

This bike would look better with Fat tires. I also Looovvee the fact that it's offered in six frame sizes 😉. G👍👍D job Haibike .

G😛😛D job Court. We love your channel so much 👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏

✌ from "CLOTHED IN SHADOWS"👤

"CLOTHED IN SHADOWS"👤

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

It sounds like they were reading your mind with the 2017 version which uses 27.5" and 2.4" tires! http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/364/2017-xduro-trekking-4-0?variant=3857211748#specs

Steve Donovan
6 months ago

It is a nice bike but I don't think I'd rely on its rear stays to absorb much if anything. As you point out another good candidate for a Thudbuster. I wonder about manufacturers why they don't deal with a good seat post company for wholesale pricing and include it as part of their package. It may be a hundred more for the buyer but definitely worth it.

Steve Donovan
6 months ago

Right that must be the hard-sell factor weighed against implementation. Too bad because I would think for a lot of first impressions a good functioning suspension post could make the difference. I wonder how many prospective buyers would be considering their own changes to a bike after it's purchased.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Yeah, I'm with you Steve... perhaps they are concerned that it will raise the saddle and discourage some shorter riders who don't realize that they could swap it out for a cheaper post for under $10? Some ebikes are including seat post suspension units with their bikes now like the Motiv Spark https://electricbikereview.com/motiv/spark/ Kalkhoff Agattu B7 https://electricbikereview.com/kalkhoff/agattu-b7/ and Riese & Müller Charger https://electricbikereview.com/riese-muller/charger-gx-rohloff-hs/

Bruce Ballad
6 months ago

the frame looks so nice that the motor is looking kind of ugly and fat on it. other than this I like the bike.

Bruce Ballad
6 months ago

Ohh yes, that angled motor looks better.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Yeah, they really improved the look for 2017 http://www.haibike.com/en-US/US/bikes/364/2017-xduro-trekking-4-0?variant=3857211748#specs

Chauncey Smith
6 months ago

Take my money this bike is my love.it looks so cool even in black .

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

I like it as well, Haibike always has beautiful designs and paint :)

James Mason
6 months ago

Bosch is taking over the world seems like every bike has a Bosch motor

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Yeah, I feel like Yamaha is finally going to get competitive with their new system that offers high RPM and Shimano finally added a charging port on their downtube battery interface so you don't have to take the pack off every time. This is stuff that Bosch figured out over five years ago and they could have just copied... but didn't ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

James Mason
6 months ago

I have a bionx

Andrew
6 months ago

definitely for European mid drive ebikes, shimano seems popular with with US bikes. Also the budget bikes and kits are still very much into bafang.

Tonys6550
6 months ago

I love the squirrel making a run for it in the background @9:04
Then making another appearance in the tree @18:14 haha
🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿