BULLS Cross E Review

Bulls Cross E Electric Bike Review
Bulls Cross E
Bulls Cross E Bosch Active Line Mid Drive Ebike Motor
Bulls Cross E I Rack With Spring Latch Pannier Blockers Battery Slot Fuxon Led Light
Bulls Cross E Adjustable Angle Stem Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Bulls Cross E Sr Suntour Nex E25 Spring Suspension
Bulls Cross E 10 Speed Shimano Alivio Drivetrain
Bulls Cross E Rack Mount Bosch Electric Bike Battery Powerpack 400
Bulls Cross E Plastic Chain Cover
Bulls Cross E Rear Mount Adjustable Kickstand Tektro Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Bulls Cross E Bosch Ebike Battery Charger
Bulls Cross E Stock Mixte
Bulls Cross E Stock Diamond
Bulls Cross E Electric Bike Review
Bulls Cross E
Bulls Cross E Bosch Active Line Mid Drive Ebike Motor
Bulls Cross E I Rack With Spring Latch Pannier Blockers Battery Slot Fuxon Led Light
Bulls Cross E Adjustable Angle Stem Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Bulls Cross E Sr Suntour Nex E25 Spring Suspension
Bulls Cross E 10 Speed Shimano Alivio Drivetrain
Bulls Cross E Rack Mount Bosch Electric Bike Battery Powerpack 400
Bulls Cross E Plastic Chain Cover
Bulls Cross E Rear Mount Adjustable Kickstand Tektro Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Bulls Cross E Bosch Ebike Battery Charger
Bulls Cross E Stock Mixte
Bulls Cross E Stock Diamond

Summary

  • Well priced considering the quality Bosch-made electric drive system, four frame size choices, and three frame styles (high, mid, and low-step)
  • Integrated LED lights and premium Continental tires with reflective sidewall stripes help to keep you visible in dark riding conditions
  • Packed with useful accessories such as fenders, an adjustable kickstand, adjustable stem, rack-mounted mini pump, and keyed-alike cable lock
  • The Bosch Active Line Cruise motor doesn't offer as much torque but operates more quietly and conserves energy, rack-mounted battery positions weight high and rear vs. low and center

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

BULLS

Model:

Cross E

Price:

$2,799

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting, Touring

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Motor and Battery, 5 Years Frame

Availability:

Europe, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

59.2 lbs (26.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.8 lbs (2.63 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

7005 Aluminium Alloy

Frame Sizes:

17.7 in (44.95 cm)18.9 in (48 cm)19.7 in (50.03 cm)20.9 in (53.08 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Wave: 18" Stand Over Height, 22.5" Reach

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Mid-Step, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Gloss White and Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour NEX-E25 DS HLO Spring Suspension, 63 mm Travel, Lockout Adjust, 100 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Alivio RD-T4000SGS, 11-34 Tooth Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Acera SL-M310 Triggers on Right

Cranks:

SR Suntour, 170 mm Length, 18 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

Wellgo 884DU Plastic Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

Semi-Integrated, Threaded, 1-1/8"

Stem:

Alloy, 90 mm Length, Quill 180 mm, Adjustable Angle 0° to 60°

Handlebar:

Alloy, 600 mm or 620 mm Width, 25° Up, 37° Sweep Back, 25.4 mm Bore

Brake Details:

Tektro HD-M285 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Back Rotor, Tektro Levers with Adjustable Reach, Two-Finger

Grips:

Velo Rubber Ergonomic

Saddle:

Selle Royal Freeway City

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Bulls DDM-1, Double Wall, Alloy, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G Front 13G Rear, Stainless Steel, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Continental E-Contact Reflex, 42-622, 28" x 1.6"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

73 PSI Max Inflation, Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Safety Plus Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

i-Rack with Spring Latch and Slide Holes (25 kg Max), SKS Rookie Mini Pump, Rain Force Plastic Fenders, Plastic Chain Cover, AXA Cafe Lock, Flick Bell on Right, Integrated 6 Volt LED Headlight, Integrated Fuxon LED Back Light, AXA Cable Lock (All Locks Use the Same Key), Adjustable Length Kickstand, Sticker Slap Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch Active Line Cruise

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

482.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese Cobalt

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Estimated Max Range:

130 miles (209 km)

Display Type:

Bosch Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD, (Hold Reset and i to Enter Settings)

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 5 Volt 500 mA Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Combined Torque, Cadence and Speed Measured 1,000 Times Per Second), (Eco 40% 35 Nm, Tour 100% 40 Nm, Sport 150% 45 Nm, Turbo 250% 50 Nm)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

Depending on your frame of reference, $2,800 may not sound like a bargain price, but considering the Bosch motor, upgraded 500 watt hour battery pack, advanced Intuvia display panel, and the many frame size and style options that this bike offers… I think it’s an incredible value. The Bulls Cross E is a city style ebike that would make an excellent commuting platform or casual neighborhood ride. It comes standard with nearly every accessory you could want and they all match and fit properly. It’s fairly comfortable thanks to a name brand saddle, suspension fork, ergonomic grips, and adjustable stem but starting with the optimal frame size and style should not be overlooked as they are generally not an option on cheaper products. When you combine the correct size with some well integrated comfort features, you end up with a bike that you can ride further before feeling uncomfortable, and that’s a huge deal on an electric bike rated from 30 to 100+ miles per charge. Instead of a one size fits all approach, the Cross E caters to your needs. Want the easiest frame to mount and don’t mind a bit of frame flex? Then the wave step-thru model is best… want to look a bit sportier and improve stiffness but still have an easier time mounting? Then the mixte mid-step model is best… trying to optimize stiffness, power transfer, and possibly make the bike easier to lift and hang on some car racks? Then the traditional diamond high-step is your best choice. As a guy, I love that the mixte frame looks a bit more masculine but still provides lower stand-over height and love that Bulls chose a color scheme that looks professional and appeals to both men and women. There are so many little details to discuss about this electric bicycle, and they are all listed in the stats section above and mentioned in the video, but they could be easy to overlook or not appreciate if you haven’t seen as many electric bicycles as I have. The only area I would even think about upgrading is the seat post. I’d consider swapping the 30.9 mm rigid Aluminum post with a suspension post to provide a bit more cushion because my back and neck are extra sensitive from a sports injury years ago. Keep in mind, if you think about swapping the post out, it will raise the minimum saddle height by a few inches and thus impact your fit. Only go for this if you don’t mind the saddle being a bit higher.

Driving the Cross E is an internally geared mid-motor from Bosch. It’s not their fastest or most powerful model, but it is their smoothest, quietest, and longest range because it sips power. The Bosch Active Line Cruise is the same size and weight as the high-powered Performance models but has a slightly different styled. It offers 200 watts nominal with peak 500+ watts and up to 48 Newton meters of torque. Compared to the CX motor which offers 75 Nm, it’s weaker, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. The Cross E was designed for smooth, paved environments where acceleration isn’t encumbered by rocks and trail obstacles. It moves efficiently, even without motor assistance, thanks to larger 700c (28″ diameter) wheels and hybrid tires. And the tires Bulls opted for here are made from puncture resistant material and have reflective stripes on the side. When you pair a locking short-travel suspension fork with those firm tires (rated to 75 PSI) you get a smooth coasting machine. I guess what I’m trying to convey here is that the Active Line motor fits the use case and build choices of the bike. Yep, it’s a bit slower and weaker, but it works just fine. And just like all of the other Bosch motors right now, it delivers shift detection to reduce strain on the chain, sprockets, and derailleur. With eight gears to shift through and a mid-level component group (Shimano Alivio), I feel that the overall pedaling experience and reliability are good.

Powering the Cross E is a Bosch Powerpack 500 rack-mounted battery (despite the demo model in the video having only a Powerpack 400). To me, this battery is almost overkill! Expect excellent range because of the Active Line motor and efficient tires. The battery contains Lithium-ion batteries that are known for being lightweight and long lasting, the pack weighs ~5.8 lbs and charges in roughly 4.5 hours from empty. You can charge the battery while mounted in the rack or slide it out and bring it into your room or office. Note that the first half of the battery charges faster and might only take an hour and a half or two to fill because the cells aren’t having to balance. Bosch offers two chargers and I cannot say for sure which one you’ll get with this ebike. They are both relatively light and compact but one puts out 4 Amps and the other just 2 Amps. Considering that this bike has the larger battery and nicer Bosch Intuvia display panel, I wouldn’t be surprised if it came with the 4 Amp. And you’ll have no problem taking that charger with you because the bike comes with a really great rack. Consider grabbing a trunk bag or panniers at your local shop. And, to really extend the life of the battery, I suggest storing it in a cool, dry location. Extreme heat and cold can wear the cells down more quickly. Part of what you’re paying for on this bike is the Bosch name which promises quality and longevity. Their battery designs are backward compatible so far which makes finding and replacing packs easier. You get a two-year comprehensive warranty on the bike because that’s what Bosch offers and I hear from shops frequently that they rarely ever have issues.

To operate the bike, just charge that battery and slide it into the rack interface. Make sure it’s locked securely and then press the power button on the display panel. The Intuvia display is my favorite, now that Bosch has a smaller Bosch Purion model, because it’s easy to read and has a USB charging port built into the right side. With a cheap adapter cable you can charge your phone on the go and take advantage of the high capacity battery. The display panel is greyscale but backlit by a faint blue glow. It can be swiveled forward and back to reduce glare while riding and even removed completely for safe storage! Considering that this bike weighs nearly 60 lbs, I really appreciate the quick release wheels, seat, battery, and display panel because they make it so versatile for transport or maintenance. The display panel has a bunch of settings that can be explored by holding reset and i together once it’s on, and you can navigate through the four levels of assist that it offers by pressing + or – on the independent button pad. This pad is positioned very close to the left grip, making it easy and safe to use while riding. It produces a tactile click which lets you keep your eyes on the road vs. looking down to the display for confirmation. I usually ride efficient Bosch powered bikes like this with the two lowest levels of assist but might explore the third (Sport) here because of the weaker motor. All in all, the display interface is great except that you cannot turn off backlighting. You can press the lightbulb icon to turn the integrated lights on or off, but not the backlighting of the display.

Other highlights of this bike include a cafe lock with cable insert that uses the same key as the battery pack, integrated lights that run off the main battery, plastic fenders that have extra support arms to keep them quiet (plastic is light and durable but tends to be noisier), a well-positioned kickstand with adjustable length, a bell, and hydraulic disc brakes. Getting up to speed, being efficient, and feeling comfortable are all important but stopping is critical. Hydraulic brakes tend to be easier to actuate and in this case, adjustable-reach levers allow you to dial in fit. Whether you have small hands, large hands, or wear gloves for part of the year, these levers are going to fit you well with a bit of quick adjustment. Staying clean really matters if you’re cycling to work daily (and have to deal with wet conditions) and so, in addition to fenders, Bulls has also included a plastic chain cover to keep your pant leg clean and snag-free. It may see minor and obvious but so many other bikes don’t do this (many which are mountain or trail bikes… but some city bikes as well). Coming back to that price point, yes, it’s way more than some of the online-only direct to consumer products. But you do get something for your money here. This is an electric bike that I would expect to last longer, perform better, and be safer than many alternatives. The convenience of integrated lights that won’t be left on accidentally or stolen so easily is great. The list of Pro’s and Con’s below goes into more details and links to some good accessories but the vast dealer network of Bulls retailers can also help you to get this thing setup right for your needs. Really think about the frame style that works best for your body and then pick the correct size. One final little note, they even threw in a mini-pump that fits into the rear rack! To me, that’s awesome, and makes this a candidate for e-bike touring. Big thanks to Bulls for partnering with me on this review and inviting me out to their headquarters for back to back test rides. It allowed for a better comparison of motors and appreciation for the differences between commuter models (of which they have several). Frame specifics for the Cross E here are: Wave: 45/50cm, Mixte: 45/50cm, Diamond: 48/53cm.

Pros:

  • This is one of the most feature complete electric bikes I have tested, especially at the $2,800 price point, you get lights, fenders, a bell, adjustable kickstand, mini-pump, and a cafe and cable lock that are keyed to match the battery so you don’t end up with extra keys weighing down your keychain (you get four copies of the key vs. just with many other ebikes)
  • It offers an exceedingly comfortable ergonomic experience through a combination of basic suspension fork, gel saddle, swept-back handlebar with ergonomic grips and adjustable-angle stem, consider adding a 30.9 mm seat post suspension for even more back and neck comfort if you ride on varied terrain (but note that it will raise the minimum saddle height by ~3 inches)
  • Your choice from four frame sizes and three frame styles (wave, mixte, and diamond) allows for proper fit and confidence when riding, you can optimize for stiffness and power transfer with the diamond frame or easy-approach and stand-over with the wave
  • Sometimes, plastic fenders can rattle and produce more noise than Aluminum or Steel but Bulls has opted for nicer fenders here with additional support struts so they aren’t so loud… I did hear the kickstand chatter a bit when I went off of the curb
  • Hydraulic disc brakes tend to require less hand strength and feel smooth and powerful, you get mid-level Tektro brakes on the Cross E and the levers offer adjustable reach to accommodate different hand sizes
  • In addition to a nice set of fenders, the Bulls Cross E also comes with a plastic chain cover to keep your right pant leg clean and snag-free
  • The Bosch Intuvia display panel is large and easy to read even if you’re sitting up straight and further away, I love that it has a Micr-USB port built in so you can charge your phone or other portable electronic device while riding, use cables like this for many devices and a USB-C or Lightening cable depending on your phone
  • With eight gears and a mid-level derailleur, you get enough cadence range for climbing or cruising at the 20 mph top assisted speed, the Bosch motor offers shift detection to keep it smooth and protect the hardware a bit more than many other ebikes I have tested
  • The rear rack is impressive, it uses standard gauge tubing, which should work for most panniers, and has two slots for lower clips or bungee cords
  • Bulls is an international e-bike company with many dealers and a solid two-year+ warranty, this means the bike should be assembled more professionally, fit to you, and supported over the long run
  • Overall, I like the color scheme that Bulls chose for this model because it’s gender neutral and professional, the black cables, grey battery, and motor casing all blend into the black frame

Cons:

  • The suspension fork is kind of basic with limited adjustability, it’s a spring design which weighs more but at least it comes with lockout so you can stop dive (when the bike tips forward under hard braking) and increase efficiency by stopping bob as you ride if the terrain is smooth
  • Weighing in at nearly 60 pounds (27 kg), this is not an especially lightweight electric bicycle, the fenders, rack, lights, kickstand, longer bars, gel saddle, mini-pump etc. all add up… but at least the battery and display panel are removable and both wheels have quick release for easier flat fixes and maintenance
  • If you opt for the wave step-thru frame style, there may be some frame flex because of the rear mounted battery (and this flex could increase if you load up the rack), it’s not the end of the world and I noticed a cross-bar reinforcing the lowest section of frame, but it is a compromise in strength to optimize for easy-mounting
  • The Bosch centerdrive motor systems use a smaller than normal sprocket which spins 2.5x per crank arm revolution and this tends to produce a bit more noise (especially at high RPM), the Active Line Cruise model is the quietest version because it isn’t as zippy or powerful as the Performance Line models but it still produces some extra noise
  • To save costs, some of the accessories are generic or off-brand including the fenders, non-locking grips, and lights but other areas are still high-end including the Selle Royal Saddle and AXA frame and cable lock
  • I didn’t have an issue with this during my test ride but have noticed that some adjustable angle stems can get loose over time if you ride on bumpy terrain, just keep an eye on the stem and consider swapping it with a rigid stem someday if you do have issues, it’s a good way to determine which angle and length you like by adjusting over time and then narrowing down and buying one that’s rigid
  • I’m not a huge fan of plastic pedals with rubber tread because they can get a little bit slippery in wet riding conditions, but at least they won’t scrape your shins if you slip off, these pedals are probably fine for urban riding and can be replaced with something like this that’s affordable and good looking
  • I love that the high-step and mid-step frames come with bottle cage bosses (and they all have a rack) but the deep step-thru model does not have them

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More BULLS Reviews

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS 2 27.5 Plus Review

  • MSRP: $4,099
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

One of the cleanest looking full suspension cross country electric bikes I've reviewed, the battery and motor are built into the frame and match the matte black paint perfectly. Extra large battery capacity for longer rides, EnergyBus magnetic charging standard works on or off…...

BULLS SIX50 E 1.5 Review

  • MSRP: $3,099
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A hardtail trail ready e-bike with comfortable plus sized tires and a spring suspension fork (with lockout), sturdy tapered head tube, rigid thru-axles, and Boost. Capable as a commuting platform if you prefer a mountain bike vs. hybrid or city…...

BULLS Cross Lite E Step-Thru Review

  • MSRP: $4,099
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

An active, sporty looking, commuter style electric bike with low standover height, available in three frame sizes to improve fit and comfort. High-end drivetrain and motor systems, you get eleven gears with a tough mountain bike level…...

BULLS SIX50+ E FS 3 Review

  • MSRP: $4,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

An all-mountain electric bike with plus sized tires for improved stability, traction and comfort, 150 mm air suspension with compression and rebound adjust. Battery and motor mount design are tighter than older Bosch systems, weight is kept low…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO 45 FS Review

  • MSRP: $5,199
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A high quality full suspension e-mountain bike that's also a speed pedelec (capable of 28 mph top speeds), solid hydraulic disc brakes, wide thru-axles with Boost Technology. Adjustable 150 mm RockShox suspension front and rear, four-bar rear swing arm to reduce brake…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO 3 Carbon 27.5 Plus Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A Carbon fiber electric cross country mountain bike with premium components and ultra-integrated motor and battery system, excellent weight distribution. The Brose motor is quiet and responsive offering up to 90 Nm of torque output,…...

BULLS DAIL-E Grinder Review

  • MSRP: $5,799
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

One of the first Gravel Grinder style electric bikes to make it to America! Made with premium components, high performance lights and a purpose built frame in three sizes. Capable of high speed 28 mph performance, the Bosch centerdrive motor measures bike speed, pedal…...

BULLS SIX50 E2 Street Review

  • MSRP: $3,899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A fully equipped speed commuter capable of 28 mph operation, running on the proven Bosch Performance mid-drive motor and updated 500 watt hour Samsung battery. Extra large 203 mm hydraulic disc brakes offer smooth solid stops without requiring exorbitant hand…...

BULLS Lacuba EVO E8 Review

  • MSRP: $3,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A versatile urban electric bike well suited to commuting, touring and trekking because of its efficient mid-drive motor and larger than average battery capacity, durable internal gearing and belt drive. Available in five frame sizes and three frame styles including wave, mid-step and high-step diamond…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Plus Review

  • MSRP: $4,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A stealthy full suspension all-mountain electric bike with longer travel 150 mm suspension, fully adjustable air fork by RockShox, color matched to frame. Larger 37 volt 17.5 amp hour battery pack to assist with steeper climbs and longer…...

BULLS Monster E FS Review

  • MSRP: $5,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

Full suspension fat bike with a high quality mid-drive motor from Bosch and their updated 500 watt hour battery pack for extended range. Cool fluorescent paint job that extends all the way through the fork, rear shock housing,…...

BULLS Lacuba EVO E45 Review

  • MSRP: $4,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

Available in four frame sizes, two styles (high-step and mid-step) with an adjustable stem, active-comfort saddle and ergonomic grips, this bike can fit well and feel good at speed and over long distances. Capable of 28 mph top speeds, this is a Class 3 electric bike with an…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Review

  • MSRP: $4,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An all-mountain electric bike with beautifully integrated battery, motor and display... it blends in more than most other e-mountain bikes I've tested and runs quiet. Sturdy 15 mm thru axle in the front and 12 mm axle in the rear…...

BULLS SIX50 E FS 3 RSI Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A loaded full suspension mountain bike with premium electric drivetrain from Bosch offering 75 Nm of climbing torque with the CX motor and a 400 watt hour Samsung battery. RockShox air suspension with 120 mm travel front and rear for solid trail or all…...

BULLS Monster E S Review

  • MSRP: $4,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

Premium hardtail electric fat bike with all the fixins, highlights include rear rack bosses, tubeless-ready tires and punched out rims, RockShox air fork with remote lockout and high torque Bosch CX motor. Quality 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano for excellent stopping power and modulation, impressive…...

BULLS Outlaw E45 Review

  • MSRP: $3,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A sporty looking, fairly comfortable speed pedelec capable of ~28 mph top speeds, it's running on an optimized geared hub motor design with heat pipe technology for maximum performance. Unique mid-mount battery box fills the main frame triangle keeping weight low and centered while…...

BULLS Sturmvogel E EVO Review

  • MSRP: $3,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautifully designed urban electric bike painted white for visibility and modern appeal, white walled tires, reflective sidewall stripes, LED lights. Extra sturdy and durable thanks to a 15 mm thru-axle on the front wheel (with…...

BULLS TWENTY9 E FS 3 RSI Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A full suspension, Bosch powered, cross country style electric bike with efficient 29" wheels, it's available in three sizes for good fit and would feel taller and larger for riders with long legs but still fits some shorter riders given the angled top tube. Quick release for both wheels ads convenience for fixes and transporting the bike, I love…...

BULLS Cross Lite E Review

  • MSRP: $3,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

Fully loaded urban electric bicycle with great accessories for commuting including an aluminum rear rack, full length fenders with mud flaps and integrated LED lights. Relatively light weight at under 50 lbs, this is due in part to the nicer…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS Enduro 27.5 Review

  • MSRP: $5,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An enduro style full suspension electric mountain bike with longer 160 mm suspension travel, seat post dropper, 27.5" wheelset and premium hydraulic brakes. Downtube-integrated battery pack is out of sight and keeps weight low and centered across the…...


Be the First to Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Over50
1 day ago

Lots of people with RV's have a ladder up the back, and some of them hoist bikes up there and chain them up..

Some of the hitch mounted platform bike carriers also have ramp attachments (like my Thule Easy Fold) where you can roll the bike up onto the rack. I wouldn't limit my choicest to the lightest bike just solely based on the thought you have to lift the bike onto a rack.

Ravi posted the Bulls Cross Lite E as an option. I would have seriously considered purchase of that bike if I had a dealer in my area. Court had a positive review of that bike.

Ravi Kempaiah
1 day ago

As I stated in my title, I'm a 5-foot 1-inch female who will be traveling alone in my RV across the country. I want to make the best bike selection that I can. Fortunately I have the funds to buy any bike that I want. What I want is a bike that I can lift onto the rack myself. I want to step through, and I want to be able to haul a few simple groceries. I want the most power I can get at the lightest-weight. I want the longest lasting battery I can get and I want to be able to trail ride as well as street ride. I don't intend to do any heavy duty mountain biking on rocky trails or anything like that, but I would like to be able to head out on relatively smooth dirt trails from time to time.

What do you think would be the best bike for me? I am brand new to ebikes and I am clueless!

Lightest bike: Easy Go Street at 42lbs. https://emotionbikesusa.com/easygo-street/
keep an extra battery and you're good for 25 miles.

Moderate performance, price, and weight but wide range of availability and service:
Trek Lift+ https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/electric-bikes/lift/lift-lowstep/p/1325601-2017/?colorCode=white

Felt Verza E: http://www.feltbicycles.com/USA/2016/Bikes/electric/road/verzae-30-s.aspx

High-performance, top-notch components, sub 50lbs bikes:

http://www.feltbicycles.com/USA/2016/Bikes/electric/road/Verza-e-10.aspx and http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/cross-lite-e-wave-new-my17/

In all cases, if you remove the battery, the weight will reduce by 5-7lbs.

All of them (BH, Felt, Trek and BULLS) have dealers all over the country. Try it out. Make sure you are comfortable lifting it up and loading all by yourself.
I am pretty sure you can find Trek and Felt dealers who can get you those bikes.

James Alderson
2 days ago

I still just can't decide between the fat and the comp 6fattie full suspension. Both are deeply discounted with about 20 percent off for being a 2017 with the 2018's already available. I have a Haibike (my icon) Cross SL that I am loving, but do want something more trail rated to ride the rougher stuff with. None of it matters though as I can hardly get out of bed after a fairly short ride yesterday... old and fat does not work well for biking...lol.

Tamijo
2 days ago

As I stated in my title, I'm a 5-foot 1-inch female who will be traveling alone in my RV across the country. I want to make the best bike selection that I can. Fortunately I have the funds to buy any bike that I want. What I want is a bike that I can lift onto the rack myself. I want to step through, and I want to be able to haul a few simple groceries. I want the most power I can get at the lightest-weight. I want the longest lasting battery I can get and I want to be able to trail ride as well as street ride. I don't intend to do any heavy duty mountain biking on rocky trails or anything like that, but I would like to be able to head out on relatively smooth dirt trails from time to time.

What do you think would be the best bike for me? I am brand new to ebikes and I am clueless!

Rooster
2 days ago

I have an older cross current with a center stand so I guess I will find out soon enough.
I don't think it applies to the cc, I think you're alright and I talked to them today and it looks like they're gonna fix me up. I don't think they are out to screw anyone, I think they just got a little ahead of themselves although it is gonna be alot of work for me I just wanna get this thing right. Hopefully I'm not speaking to soon.

theaggravatedjew
2 days ago

I have an older cross current with a center stand so I guess I will find out soon enough.

Scooteretti
3 days ago

All,

When shipping batteries by air or ground the shipper MUST be DG trained and that all packages be packed and labeled in full compliance. Air shipping is much more strict than ground shipments but both must methods require that they be labeled and packed correctly by a trained DG shipper. The laws apply to shippers in both Canada and the US.

Failure to comply can lead to fines and criminal charges if an incident were to occur. This is now becoming a very serious offense so do not try and cheat the system as it's becoming very clear that they are cracking down of those who break the rules. Trying to ship product cross border is the perfect way to get caught and heavily fined.

For us when a customer purchases a bike or battery online it's passed over to one of our trained DG experts who pack and complete the proper paperwork for the shipment. Once they sign off on the shipment the employee & Scooteretti now become legally responsible for the proper declaration of the packages contents.

We are a huge advocate of shipping lithium batteries and products containing lithium batteries. We are now working in conjunction with various DOT departments in a proactive way to help the industry learn about the safe handling of these items. Our goal is to be proactive in preventing any possible accidents caused by these products.

regards,

William
shop.scooteretti.com

Rooster
5 days ago

After 50 miles on the bike... all in all my feelings are positive. With the cross current s and its upgrades kinda having that slight tinge of buyers regret... but eh I wasn't sure I'd enjoy riding e-bikes at all when I ordered the ocean current.. and I was in the "dont want a road-bike" phase.. now I'm in the "wish I had more power and speed."

Anyhow, when I received the bike, there was minor rear-rotor damage (had to bend it back in) and one of the electronics connectors was loose (bike did not come to life until I checked all the connections). Other than that, in excellent condition, and included (at least according to the sticker) a slightly larger battery than ordered (the website has since been updated). Put around 40 miles on before I felt the desire to recharge (sadly dont have a fancy charger to verify AH / WH ).

Not having used any other e-bike, and of course obstensibly the desire was something that could get me exercising on a regular basis (knee just cant take jogging, running, etc), and maybe occasionally commute to work (sadly the area is kinda .. not bike friendly... apparently the whole state of florida is pretty bad... and I think we rank 2nd in the nation of fatalties, I know we're way up there with auto-peds).

I hope Juiced Bikes will release new fender and rack kits... I wanted both, but both were sold out, so I ordered the same fenders from planet bike, but its obvious that juiced bikes must have been done some modifications... as even if some tweaking and few parts from a local home-store, still get rubbing. (Ironically juiced bikes has removed the fenders from their store all together). Probably just more "should have gone with the cross current s" in the back of mind. I know in the cross current S promo there is some talk of jucied making their own rack.... hopefully we'll see something.

But all in all I am happy. Been out every other day to ride since I got it, until we had rain-poculus (6 inches one day, 4 the following).
I have the same dalema, I too bought the ocean current and now I'm seeing all the upgrades wishing I had waited but they promised me they were going to let me know when the LCD display and the controller that should have been put on these bikes in the first place are available but I figure they're telling me what I want to hear. I'm keeping my fingers crossed but not holding my breath. It would be nice if they would remember the one's that bought the early models and actually helped they're business grow but we'll see. I don't think I mentioned that I also ordered mine with the LCD display and was given a refund because they screwed up, I wouldn't have bought the bike had I known that. Anyway, WE WILL SEE HOW IT WORKS OUT?

windmill
6 days ago

So far the only mystery is why I am going through so many spokes.
I am currently waiting for some Sapim spokes for my rear wheel.
I am hoping this will solve the issue.

Hopefully this with solve my shifting issues which I have had since I got the bike.
The rear tire might be repairable. I really like the feel of that balloon tire and am hoping I can keep it.
The Radwagon it a rough ride. Reminds me of my old Jeep Wrangler. Having that balloon tire seemed to take the edge off some of the bumps.

Got about 1200 miles out of 13g Sapim spokes before one broke. Problem is the large diameter of the hub motor combined with a 26" rim puts the spokes at too much of an angle to the rim, preventing them from running straight. The slight kink in the spoke at the nipple flexes under drive and braking forces until the stress causes one or more to break. Thats why motorcycle rims have the spoke holes drilled at an angle in raised dimples, so the spokes can run perfectly straight.

I got new Sapim spokes, and went back to 12g, but this time I laced the rim radially (spokes are 90 degree to the rim and don't cross). If that doesn't solve the issue, I'll go with a moped rim with motorcycle style drilling. New spokes are 150mm long and I used 16mm wheelmaster nipples.

Early on I replaced the rear derailleur with a Shimano Deore, and the shift cables with Jagwire mountain pro cables. Shifting has been flawless since then.

Schwalbe Big Ben Plus tires are much better than the OE tires, and have significant flat protection.
https://www.schwalbetires.com/node/2417

Radial spoke.

Moped rim.

1/2
indianajo
6 days ago

I'm age 67, and I hit ~35 mph on my human powered bike down the 15% grade out near my summer camp. If a deer jumps out on me I may wish I had better brakes. Or that I could jump as high as I could 15 years ago. ****, I'm stiff.
I don't see running electric over 20 mph in traffic. My average human powered is 8 mph , 6 against a stiff wind and 10 with it cross me. So 12 mph would be a big improvement. The 750 watts in the kit I'm eyeing would be for dragging 160 lb me, 110 lb of bike & baskets & 50 lb of groceries/supplies up the 15% grade near my camp.

indianajo
6 days ago

So much pessimism. So little DIY adventure.
The local bike shop sold me a Schwinn in 87 that dumped me on the road due to a insufficiently torqued stem. They are good at tires, period. The bikes they have in stock are way to big for me except the single speed ones, useless on the 8% hill a half mile from my house. One bike shop over in Kentucky also has stock only for enormous leggy European/African people.
In e-bikes the heavier the frame, the better, within limits. So that junk steel the metal man is hauling off in his pickup truck, that is IMHO what you want. Caveat, the trash bikes are sized for kids, 18" stem to stem max, and adults need longer frames than you find used. I have native AM bones with short legs/long torso, and will be converting a nineties girls 10 speed soon to geared hub electric. Five gears (suntour) are too high for me, perfect for e-assist.
Internet bike parts suppliers, so far I've used niagaracycle.com. They are good at their big parts, but complete idiots at measuring small nuts to make them match up to the description. They can't read a machinist scale and can't even ship the same nut size twice on the same order description a month apart. They refund promptly for the trash nuts they send you. They shipped a shifter rod for a sixties Sturmey-Archer 3 spd hub right, so if the identification is unique they can do it. They are in NY for us east of the Mississippi that don't like UPS rates from Oregon/Calif.
Jepson seems expensive, competitivecyclist seems mostly tuned to light weight racing parts. Modernbike.com may get my next order. They are in Iowa.
I'm seeing a lot of facts on here about lunacycle.com kits, and their prices seem good. Descriptions are almost complete. They are in CAlif. ebikes.ca in canada has even better descriptions and support, but cross border shipping inhibits me from trying them. Plus they are in Vancouver, further even than oregon. UPS charges for milage.
Don't forget Amazon. They are not sophisticated and the descriptions are brief and maddening, but for generic things like spokes, brake pads, derailleur takeups, they are cheap and their warehouse is 6 miles from me in Kentuckiana. I've used them four times.

Dewey
1 week ago

The Juiced Cross Current S is supposed to have a controller/display the user can change modes between the 3 California classes and an "off-road mode" that lets the motor run to its power speed limit of just over 30mph. At that speed on any street in the US it is considered a moped, motor-driven cycle, or motorcycle, and without a VIN number it cannot be legally registered, titled, insured, or operated as a motor vehicle. It is being marketed as an ebike but falls outside all current legal definitions of an ebike so I don't think this is the way forward as it just puts riders at risk of liability/contributory negligence suits.

Denis Shelston
1 week ago

By Michael Skopes. August 2017
With permission

A 2017 E-Bike Adventure

One day, not so long ago, I opened a door to enter an area where I am employed. I was hit, full on, with the fact that I no longer have any passion for what it is I do there. My days there are only a passing of time spent wondering about other things more important to me; my family, my home,...me, and other more fun activities.

At the same time, I appreciate the compensation that my job affords me - money and health care benefits. You know, all that boring stuff like an IRA, 401k, and such. But, all that, is for the most part, pleasureless. The most pleasing aspect of that crap is the toys I can buy to make my life more FUN.

The following sentence involves a subject, which to me, borders on the surreal. Retirement...is...just...around...the...corner. Hell, retirement is something old people do. I don't qualify as an old person. At least, not in my mind, I don't.

I don't know how my twenties turned into my sixties so quickly. My brain, my heart, and my soul, all tell me it's time for another game of 500 in the park, or a few high dives off of top board at my hometown swimming pool. But, uh oh...the deep end no longer has those old diving boards! In fact, the entire pool has been completely re-built and almost unrecognizable. And, unfortunately, what my body tells me about physical activity is not quite the same as what my brain, heart, and soul communicate.

Go for a long endorphin filled cross country type run? Uh uh. Don't even think about it. My lower back and knees won't take the pounding. Damn, I loved running so much. Extend my body airborne for that long pass at the goal line like I once often did? Not a good idea. Hitting the green grass wearing pads at one time was exhilarating, not debilitating. Hey, how about attacking a radical mogul course on freshly fallen snow? Get real fella! Not anymore. Oh, the knees, the hips, the lower back. Skiing became my all time favorite winter activity while in my mid to late twenties.

Get this, though. Physical exertion is far from a thing of my youthful past. Hooray for the bicycle! Hip hip hooray for the electric bicycle! I'll get to the e-bike in just a minute. Allow me to back track for a moment.

One of my very first loves, as a young boy, was learning how to ride a bicycle. And, after mastering that marvelous activity, the extended range that became my daily excitement, grew longer and longer. Soon, I disappeared from my parents' view for hours at a time as I biked with my pals from one end of town to the other. Minutes, hours, and miles meant nothing to us. We had trusty mechanical steeds whose rolling wheels seemed capable of endless, small town, summer time adventures. If we weren't kicking up dust, pebbles, and basic dirt while racing around Chapin Park's baseball field, we were busy slamming on our brakes while screaming down swimming pool hill.

That excellent downhill activity, of melting bicycle tire rubber, left twenty foot long black streaks on the blacktop. Bald tires? We never cared. That was part of the deal. And when those rubber burning slides ended, we just might opt to take a little detour out to the long abandoned strip mines. Out there, on the outskirts of town, the giant coal digging machines of old left us with huge mounds of gray/white earth. Over time, outstanding trails developed throughout those sometimes treacherous hills which were intertwined with deep, blue pools of water that stretched for hundreds of feet. Riding those paths brought many a boy, and a few girls, to the point of total exhaustion, and in some cases...broken frames and fractured bones.

Yes, my childhood relationship with my Monark bicycle was a love affair. Many of my friends had that same love affair. Several of us participated in the annual Corn Festival bicycle parade. We decorated our bikes with crepe paper, flags and banners. Some kids wore costumes. I donned a Marlon Brando type motorcycle cap - the tough guy look like from his fifties movie, "The Wild One".

But that love affair broke my heart when some criminal stole my beloved Monark. Sadness became my middle name. Consolation on the part of my mother didn't even help. And I adored my mother, and how she did so much for me and my two sisters. My father offered a matter of fact response to my long face with a few well chosen words and a simple pat on my shoulder. All that did little to mend my deep psychological wound. But Dad had a quiet way about him that endeared me to him just as much as Mom.

In time, a replacement two-wheeler appeared. That tale is one whose details I won't divulge in this story. I would rather keep that for anyone interested in reading my book "My Little Skinny Greek Life: On Liberty Street". Find it on Amazon. I don't want to spoil that story here. What I will go into here, is the flash forward to today.

FLASH!

For years, various physical problems have kept me from fully enjoying the activity that I had loved for so much of my life. Before losing the ability to travel by bicycle, I had the pleasure of making two long road trips. The first, at age twenty nine and turning thirty, went on for 1500 miles from California to Illinois.

Some of the information written in an unsolicited newspaper article about that tour - going all the way to Maine, down to Florida, and back to California - never happened. Those plans had to be changed for several reasons. I actually can't recall the primary reason. It may have been that being a touring novice, I bit off more than I could pedal.

I have read, in my current research, that the number one reason for many new bike touring enthusiasts cutting their tours short is because of unrealistic goals. Their mental and physical preparations couldn't match up with their lofty plans. Really. Just imagine coming up with the idea of riding a heavily outfitted bicycle for 7,000 miles without ever having done any touring at all prior to that. Hmm...you see what I mean? However, I did go over 1,500 miles on my Centurion two wheeler.

My second major distance bicycle adventure took me from Monterey, California south to Los Angeles and specifically, Northridge to attend a Super Bowl party. However, I only managed to put in about 155 miles because I strained my knee and had to grab a bus for part of the remaining distance.

So, as I mentioned above, hip hip hooray for the electric bike. Because now, I am so happy to say that I have returned to the joyful activity of riding a long distance tour by bicycle. I am in the middle of one as I write this story. It is forty miles this time. Nowhere near 1,500...yet.

This time, so many calendar years later and with bike technology that is light years ahead of 1982, I now ride a RadRover from Rad Power Bikes, out of Seattle, Washington. They have created a beauty that comes in two colors; black or white. I chose black. It is an electrically powered fat bike which I have modified to fit my practical and esthetic needs.

It is known as a fat bike partly because it has four inch wide knobby, fat, tires. It is, in essence, a mountain bike which is very capable as a road bike at the same time. The 750 watt motor and the 48 volt battery can take me up to 25 miles with my leg power added. With a second battery stowed away in my Burley Nomad trailer, my distance doubles. When that runs out, I hopefully am already camped or in a hotel where I can re-charge for the next day of travel.

My interest in bicycle touring was recently re-kindled by stumbling upon a few videos on YouTube. Seeing the various examples of which panniers to purchase, how and what to pack in them, brought back memories of my past pannier preparations. There is a certain excitement related to the process of deciding upon what to buy, where, and how much to spend. So, familiar tour preparation became a big part of my daily thoughts. This was particularly true while at my personally unsatisfying job.

Every day, while at work, my mind wandered away from vocational duties to adventurous daydreams. I couldn't help it. Every day, as I commuted to and from work, all I could think about was bike touring. Could I even physically do it anymore? I would soon find out.

Suffering through the slow stop and go crawl of heavy rush hour traffic turned into something completely different. My mind turned off the disgust associated with this daily grind and welcomed the fantasies I conjured up instead. Rather than mutter under my breath my roadway discontent with hundreds of other cars and trucks that surrounded me, I was smiling internally at the prospect of my next, long awaited, two wheeled adventure. Hot damn!

Well, the days passed by. Each night after work I would stitch together more and more ideas that percolated in my mind in the hopes of making my fantasy adventure come true. I pulled down my old Centurion Super Le Mans twelve speed that had been hanging in the garage for years and started the process of giving it new life. Yes, the very same bike that took me to Illinois from California thirty five years ago. It needed new tubes and tires for sure, and a good amount of service all totaling $240. That figure was just under what I paid for the bike new from Joslyn's Bike Shop in Monterey thirty seven years earlier. Ouch.

After that, an expense that ultimately turned out to be an unnecessary one, I rode it around my neighborhood for about a mile with no bags other than the old handlebar bag. It felt very familiar and good. The next day, I added the matching rear Eclipse panniers I had stored away from those past tours. I partially filled them with a few items to ease into a touring weight. I rode for three miles. That was not bad, but I did feel the difference and the need to get into better shape if a real extended tour were to take place. By the way, I tried desperately to figure out a way to once again use those great old blue bags on my Rover. I couldn't quite get their proprietary configuration to conform to my new ride satisfactorily, so I had to let them go back into storage after the third and final test run coming up. Bummer!

The following day, for that final test run, I went out for six miles. This time I had to walk up a few hills and also stop for a good rest or two along the way. It occurred to me, that there was no way I could realistically take this sentimental bike for a long tour ever again. My hopes faded. The idea of embarking on another tour adventure looked pretty much impossible. Then, I stumbled upon the e-bike world and everything changed.

I discovered a video, among many others, that was created by a young man named Adamm Jarvis. He produced an interesting review of the RadRover. It can be found on YouTube easily enough. I watched it a couple of times and thought the Rover was worth a better look, so I went to the Rad web site to learn more. I was impressed with the company and its young founders. Still, I needed to look around for other choices, which I did, just to be sure I was satisfied with my research.

I kept going back to Rad. I spoke with them on the phone a few times, telling them my plans and they thought the Rover would work best for my touring idea. I saw more reviews - EBR, Electric Bike Review, was another good one.

I returned to Adamm's video. There was something about it that spoke to me. It had an easy going vocal delivery by Adamm himself, music, and good production value. Along with the bike itself, featured in the video, that twenty something minute video helped me make up my mind. The Rover is what I wanted.

It is now June, 30th 2017. Today, I have pedaled my Rover twenty miles to the Sycamore Campground at the beach near Malibu, CA. Roughly ten miles on roads and streets, and ten miles on the great trail from inland to the beach. I am the only person in the hike and bike area. My campsite begins to take shape.

This may only be a shorter overnight adventure, but boy, am I ever loving it. The ride was wonderful - not hot at all, but perfect. I took this trail part way three other times. Having taken this trail now for the fourth time, and adding the camp out element to it, I am filled with a sense of adventure. I've longed for this touring/camping feeling. This short bike tour brings back all the experiences that my other longer tours gave me - scenery, fresh air, camping, exercising by bike, saying hello to new people as they go about their camping fun. The little kids on their bikes smile as they ride past me among the camp sites. I think one of those smiling little ones was the same one who woke up early the next morning and would not stop screaming. Seriously, for well over an hour, I struggled with those screams and the incessant small dog barking that complimented the shrieking. So much for a peaceful way to wake up with the great outdoors.

My penthouse suite tent is roomy and functional, but it isn't sound proof. It has enough room to hold my Rover and trailer all secured, dry and safe without a need to lock it up. I think it is fine with me right beside it. Even so, ever since my first bike was stolen so many years ago, I have never forgotten the hollow feeling of having lost such a treasured possession to some cold hearted thief. However, in my actual garage at home, my Rover is kept securely locked.

I kid around when asked about the space inside my voluminous tent.
"I have a garage, a bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom."
When people hear me say that, they often chuckle. It's true. I really make good use of the giant tent...I create a garage, a bedroom, a kitchen, and a bathroom within the nylon walls.

Many a campground will have a tendency to gross me out when it comes to the bathroom facilities. I decided to take my self contained idea to new heights by incorporating the survivalist style bathroom. I have a sliced section of a pool noodle circling the rim of a small bucket lined with a plastic waste bag, a hospital urinal, a hospital wash basin (I've spent a few days in hospital care recently), plenty of t. p., small trash bags, wet wipes, wash cloths, towels, soap, and I fill up one or two gallon plastic bottles with water from the campground source. All these comforts ease the hassle of having to walk to the facilities in the middle of the night if necessary. In fact, I am now so spoiled by this, I can't help but think that this is the only way to camp by bicycle.

Having my indoor kitchen is convenient, too. Boiling water for morning coffee without going outside is great. Oatmeal and coffee at my fingertips - perfect. My only concern is if Yogi Bear's cousins come snooping around. I had better start keeping the bulk of my minimalist food stuffs outside during the night. Ya think?

My bedroom set up is an important one. I have to be comfortable with my necessary pillow configuration, and mattress combo. My ground tarp is the first protective layer followed by the tent floor, a one half inch thick layer of foam rubber, topped with my air mattress, the Klymit Insulated Static V Sleeping Pad. I researched the mattresses and knew I had to have a top of the line product. It inflates with only about twelve deep breaths. The Klymit I bought is not their most expensive version. That said, I was not going to sacrifice my comfort to save a few bucks by going any lower.

My new sleeping bag, the OutdoorsmanLab sleeping bag is not of the mummy type. I feel way too restricted if and when I can't sprawl as part of my comfort zone. The bag also allows for poking your feet out when it gets too hot. I like that for sure. Everything is lightweight, and compact. That, my friends, is more than just desirable when biking. It is imperative.

There is so much room to work in my tent garage. I'm away from any flying pests or crawling bugs as I work. I fabricated a kick stand/tent floor protector out of a plastic coffee can lid, cardboard and gaff tape. I need to prevent holes in the tent floor. Spreading out my tools and parts inside my tent near my Rover and Nomad bicycle trailer makes it easier to be a do-it-yourselfer. Very convenient.

Here are some thoughts as the sun sinks behind the dry mountain a few yards west of my camp site.

We're taught from an early age to share. Share that Popsicle, or candy bar. Back in 1982, a lanky gray haired gentleman walked out of a small grocery store in Glacier National Park and saw I was bicycle touring. He had just unwrapped his candy bar and offered to share it with me. I think it was a Hershey bar - kindness.

"Here, have a bite of my Slim Jim, or half of my sandwich." That's a comment that may sound familiar to many of us from times past. Similarly, at another stop at a campground in northern Montana, an older retired couple, who upon learning I was in the middle of a cross country bicycle tour, offered dinner and homemade blueberry pie in their motor home camper. I will never forget the look on the woman's face, and her exclamation;

"You're doing what?? You must be hungry!"

I find it touching when on the receiving end of kindness and generosity. At the same time, I see the compassion and satisfaction on the faces of those who offer it. Those moments lead me into a more spiritual place where I often ponder the bigger picture, and how little things we do can have so much meaning.

Ah, the wonder of it all. The world going by at 70 to 80 miles per hour in a car is quite different from the world I see at 5 to 25 miles an hour by bicycle. The world I witness from a slower perspective has a more complete way of becoming a part of me. I see more. I hear more. I feel more. I acutely sense the wonder of it all.

I guess my philosophical nature comes from being Greek. My ancestors managed to produce a few good ones way back when. I'm sure you can recall their names.

This trip is only the beginning. I'd like to make several of these e-bike journeys to help re-capture some of the youthful times I loved so much. I want to retire soon and take advantage of the physical abilities I still have before they wither away never to be again. I can't see myself spending anymore precious days than I absolutely have to working in an unsatisfying job. I want to feel the wind against my face as I bike along a secluded trail. I want to hear the birds calling, see the squirrels, lizards, and rabbits dart across the trail in front of me as they rush toward their own little palaces. I want to cross the shallow stream that meanders across the trail in three different locations and get wet, muddy, and laugh about it to myself.

I travel alone. I don't mind the solitude, the mud, the sweat, the tough hills, and the occasional mechanical repair. They're all part of the smile. My smile. And I will savor all of these moments as they find me - as nature comes to me. I won't wonder, one day, why I didn't take advantage of the mountains, the beaches, the nights under the stars. Nope. That little boy who ate up the streets of small town USA while pedaling on his Monark still exists. He is just a little bigger, wiser, and definitely more gray. He continues to occupy the space between my ears and the heart of my soul.

So, this is my camp/biking story that replaced the original, longer, Santa Barbara round trip which had to be cancelled. Some of you have been waiting for this documentary of sorts for too long. I apologize for the delay. Perhaps I will get to the Santa Barbara adventure before my legs tell me to give it up. I hope to make that tour soon. For now, I hope you found this little story interesting. Perhaps even inspiring. Thanks for taking the time to share my adventure.

Denis Shelston
2 weeks ago

Such a Teo group does not exist, I was just asking to see if there could be interested parties...

I've only joined EBR recently and love it. I ended buying a fat tire e-bike, à Téo. I have been an active participant and plan on continuing.

The idea here is to have an additional place for sharing activities from Téo owners, another meeting place. Voltbike, Rad and many other brands have done same.

I have other interests and participate in many forums. That is what rocks my world. I see many Rad and Voltbike owners here and on FB, sharing on EBR and FB. I recognise names and or information. That is great. Cross pollination.

For some folks, and yes I am one of them, FB has replaced the phone and has enabled me, my friends and family to connect or reconnect, share. My 90 year old in-laws love to see our pictures from our travel and see their grand kids growing up, we exchange recipes, happy stories, sad stories and all.

Was never meant to critique EBR. It is a very, very good site, filled with invaluable e-bike resources.

Burp
2 weeks ago

Honestly, the thought that I might be above any sort of weight limit never even crossed my mind. It probably should have. But no, I never felt like I was approaching what the bike could handle as far as weight goes. I've never weighed myself with my gear, but guessing I started around 285-290 with the larger battery pack so say an even 300, plus my backpack with I'd guess close to 30 lbs fully loaded with water, tools, clothes, etc. I've stopped on the way home and bought groceries which probably added another 20 lbs without issues. My advice would be, don't overthink it, engineers build in safety factors for a reason. If using the e-bike to commute is your motivation to get in shape and improve your life (like it is for me) then don't let the weight limit distract you from your goal. In my younger days I was big into jeeps and a motto from there that I still carry, is that things don't break, they just offer opportunity for upgrades (thus the 11 gauge spokes).

Other things you should get though, right off the bat, from my experience:
- spoke wrench (standard bike multi tools don't have the tool for 12 gauge (let alone 11) spokes. Ask me how I know . . .
- quality inner tubes, at least 3-4. I've gotten 2 flats so far, both from debris in the road but I was within a mile from home so I haven't had to do a trail change yet, just walked it home. I also carry a GAADI tube that is a bike tube that you don't need to remove the wheel for. If I do need to change it on the trail, I can always cut out the old tube and put that one in for the rear to get me home and put a regular tube in. I couldn't find it domestically, so I ordered it from some German bike website.
- 18 mm offset wrench (I stress this because I have a lot of tools, but didn't have this and had to make a special run to the autoparts store to get one)
- zip ties (every time you remove the rear wheel you have to cut off a zip tie that hold the wire connection so you'll need to replace it)
- brake pads and a brake bleed kit. I got my cross current refurbished and I don't know if they put new pads on it before sending it to me. I changed my pads in the rear at around 800 miles from when I got the bike.
- chain cleaner and chain lube (you should do it weekly for commuting)
- you can figure out clothes, bike shorts, helmet, gloves etc. haha But I will say that I didn't start with gloves but bought them on day 2.

EDIT: I just noticed in a previous replay, you mentioned the 11 gauge spokes for the FRONT wheel. I have not broken ANY spokes in the front, no issues there. It's the REAR wheel spokes that'll break because of the weight and the hub motor. Get the 230mm 11 gauge spokes for the rear wheel. You could probably use standard spokes for the front as there's not nearly as much weight there.
I can't say thank you enough for all of the information you have provided, motivation, and general knowledge that you have brought to light.

Looks like I'll be purchasing a CrossCurrent S in the next few weeks. I had this image in my head that I would get on the bike and I would immediately break a few spokes and pop a tire due to my size. Hopefully in a few months I'm not worried about pushing the weight limit on anything again!

The reason I mentioned the front wheel was because the length of the spoke seems to be different on the CrossCurrent S back wheel. I'll have to look into these measurements some more and maybe call a vendor or two before I purchase anything aftermarket.

Thanks again!

Roxlimn
2 weeks ago

I've put 3000 miles on a Dirt-E with a Yamaha motor. On largely flat-ish terrain, it does 50 miles in normal traffic. Have about 3 significant bridges with climbs to cross, and the terrain rolls mildly rather than being absolutely flat. Feels flat on a car and on the ebike, but you definitely feel the slight gradients on a push-bike. Maybe 2%? Same terrain, 30 miles on flat-out full-abuse Sport mode. On Eco Mode, it'd probably do 70. Aside from your weight, it really depends on how long you're pedaling without any assist from the motor at all, which is likely enough for me since the terrain is forgiving and I am strong enough to pedal the bike past the electric assist while still being comfortable.

WilliamT
2 weeks ago

They look very similar to the batteries used by Juiced Bikes for the Cross Current and Ocean Current.

https://shop.juicedbikes.com/collections/batteries/products/battery-pack-for-crosscurrent-oceancurrent

Also similar to the FLX bikes on Luna Cycles

https://lunacycle.com/flx48vbattery/

bob armani
2 weeks ago

For those having issues with your bikes shutting down, I think I found the issue. I purchased a Neo Cross and later an Evo Snow and would like to share an experience I had with the Evo Snow.

Pop off your handle bar controller and check the height of the silver pins sticking out of the underside (four upper and two lower). They should all be the same height.

The next time a shut down happens, pull over to a safe spot on the side of the road or trail. DON'T attempt to restart the bike. Slide your handle bar controller off and check the height of the pins. Looking at the controller I found on mine that the right lower pin was stuck inside the unit and one of the upper ones was half-way down. Rubbing my thumb over the lower, it eventually popped up completely. I placed it back on the bike and it fired right up. It shut down again when I changed the power level (pressing plus, +). After sliding the controller off to check the pins, again the one was stuck down. I did the same thing as before and the bike restarted fine.

Pressing the minus (-) button was no problem. Only when I pressed the (+) button did the bike shut down. I believe there was just enough torsion/flex in the controller to lift the controller pin off the contact of the harness while it was stuck inside the controller. That cuts the control or power and shuts the bike down. When the controller is on the bike, the lower pin and plus (+) button are opposite one another both vertically and horizontally so it's kind of like a see-saw when sitting on the harness.

My solution for the pin? I removed the lead from a mechanical pencil thinking that the barrel is small enough to not go over the pin and the rim would balance/seat the barrel right on top of it. So I used that to work the pin up and down in the controller being ever so careful to not push the top of the pin lower than the housing of the controller. The pin was very sluggish at first but then eventually started moving almost as freely as the other ones after 10 or 15 times. I did the same with the other 'half-way down' pin and it seem to completely free itself.

One extra step I did with the 'problem' pin was use a can of compressed air while holding the pin down. That seem to do the trick and it was just as 'springy' as the others.

Since doing this I have not had a shut down since - about 10 rides now. I hope this helps. Ravi, your input would be appreciated.

Hello Eric H.-

I have the BH Evo Jet and I also had power shutdowns exactly as you have described above, only after riding 50 miles in from brand new. I was fortunate to speak to the BH tech at the Ebike Expo and he mentioned to rotate the controller in a horizontal position, or keep an eye on the spring loaded pins.
(I was unable to move the controller very much in the horizontal position due to the shifters being obstructed).
I would get power downs along with codes 13 and 03 which are Comm errors and TMM4 sensor errors. This would happen when switching between PAS levels on a frequent basis using (+) and (-).
My first adjustment was on the harness. The two controller screws reaching them underneath. The platform of the controller may not be flush causing a bad connection on the spring loaded pins. I found that they needed to be tightened down a bit. I have also worked the pins gently making sure the springs remain at the same level. This has resolved my issue thus far. No more power downs or Comm error codes. I also no longer switch PAS levels as frequently as before to ensure no more uneven connection points on the controller. After that being said, I make sure the pins are always in the 'up' position and protruding out across like the others.
I recently had another issue I was able to resolve. When I would stop pedaling, the motor would start shutting on and off in short spurts, causing the bike to lunge forward. I pulled over and powered the system down, and inspected the TMM4 torque sensor. I found there was a buildup of black dust on it. I went ahead and wiped it down with a soft cloth and powered the bike back up and that also resolved the issue. (Not sure if it was the power down or the cleaning of the sensor though). All of the posts has helped immensely with diagnosing the little quirks, but overall, I have had great uninterrupted rides during this season. :D

BTW-The dealer you mentioned above is the place of choice for me as well!

NovaEbike
2 weeks ago

Thanks for yet again another insightful post. I have been debating what size pack (I think I have pre-range anxiety, I don't even have a bike yet!) and was expecting to buy a bigger battery any way.

When you + the bike weighed 350 lbs do you feel that you were at the max the bike could handle? I haven't weighed myself + gear +travel accessories and I know I'll be pushing the manufacturers weight limit. I think I'll be ok buy I am not sure.

I am in the same boat as you mentioned - similar distances and evevation to climb. When i order the bike I will plan to order the 11g spokes because I'm expecting to break a few due to amount of riding and weight.

Honestly, the thought that I might be above any sort of weight limit never even crossed my mind. It probably should have. But no, I never felt like I was approaching what the bike could handle as far as weight goes. I've never weighed myself with my gear, but guessing I started around 285-290 with the larger battery pack so say an even 300, plus my backpack with I'd guess close to 30 lbs fully loaded with water, tools, clothes, etc. I've stopped on the way home and bought groceries which probably added another 20 lbs without issues. My advice would be, don't overthink it, engineers build in safety factors for a reason. If using the e-bike to commute is your motivation to get in shape and improve your life (like it is for me) then don't let the weight limit distract you from your goal. In my younger days I was big into jeeps and a motto from there that I still carry, is that things don't break, they just offer opportunity for upgrades (thus the 11 gauge spokes).

Other things you should get though, right off the bat, from my experience:
- spoke wrench (standard bike multi tools don't have the tool for 12 gauge (let alone 11) spokes. Ask me how I know . . .
- quality inner tubes, at least 3-4. I've gotten 2 flats so far, both from debris in the road but I was within a mile from home so I haven't had to do a trail change yet, just walked it home. I also carry a GAADI tube that is a bike tube that you don't need to remove the wheel for. If I do need to change it on the trail, I can always cut out the old tube and put that one in for the rear to get me home and put a regular tube in. I couldn't find it domestically, so I ordered it from some German bike website.
- 18 mm offset wrench (I stress this because I have a lot of tools, but didn't have this and had to make a special run to the autoparts store to get one)
- zip ties (every time you remove the rear wheel you have to cut off a zip tie that hold the wire connection so you'll need to replace it)
- brake pads and a brake bleed kit. I got my cross current refurbished and I don't know if they put new pads on it before sending it to me. I changed my pads in the rear at around 800 miles from when I got the bike.
- chain cleaner and chain lube (you should do it weekly for commuting)
- you can figure out clothes, bike shorts, helmet, gloves etc. haha But I will say that I didn't start with gloves but bought them on day 2.

EDIT: I just noticed in a previous replay, you mentioned the 11 gauge spokes for the FRONT wheel. I have not broken ANY spokes in the front, no issues there. It's the REAR wheel spokes that'll break because of the weight and the hub motor. Get the 230mm 11 gauge spokes for the rear wheel. You could probably use standard spokes for the front as there's not nearly as much weight there.

Pete B
2 weeks ago

Agreed, the Juiced Cross Current is a good value, other than the rear wheel spoke issue I have no complaints. Some folks might be willing to spend considerably for a more established brand. Maintaining build quality and consistency is no easy task, I think many of the newer ebike companies are realizing this. There is still a reluctance from LBS to sell and/or repair ebikes so that isn't going to help either.
Interesting, thanks for sharing. I should be getting my new and improved CrossCurrent AIR this weekend according to the website and will report any problems to this forum if I find any. The new batch of AIRs apparently have black spokes but not sure if this indicates a new brand/type or just a paint job.
You really don't want your tires to be rock hard. I'd recommend the Schwalbe Marathon Plus tire, at least for the back wheel. The max inflation is 70psi. I inflate to about 55 to 60 psi. When the tire is softer it absorbs some of the road surface impact, which causes less stress on the spokes and hub motor. The Kenda tire is max 85 psi but better to inflate 65 -70 psi.

jharlow77
2 weeks ago

I wouldn't worry. Best case scenario is that you'll have a great bike that will give you many trouble free miles, as some people have attested to on this forum. Worst case is a spoke breaking problem like some of us have. But anything on a bike is fixable. I paid $1095 for my bike, and $160 for the wheel rebuild, so in real terms my bike cost me $1,255. Even at $1,255 you cannot find any other bike this good. The bike is running great now. I went on a 30 mile ride yesterday and i'll tell you the CC Air is really a pleasure to ride. In assist level 3, (not sport) you cruise at 25 mph. That's unheard of in this price range. The only thing I'm missing is font suspension. I think my LBS can add it for about $200, so maybe in a few months that might be an upgrade.
After my conversation with Juiced Bikes I feel a lot more confident in buying the new Cross Current S. This is an email conversation I just had with Tora at Juiced Bikes...

Me:
I have heard that broken spokes are common with your bikes. Have you addressed this with the new batch of Cross Current S and Air bikes?

Tora:

The CrossCurrent line of bikes travel at much higher speeds (nearing 30mph) than a normal bike and also can accept very high tire pressures of like 85psi, making the tire rock hard, but low ruling resistance. The load on the spokes are much higher than normal.

We have some reports of broken spokes, but the spokes will not just snap off for no reason. For reference we have had no broken spokes reported for the OceanCurrent which uses the same motor, spokes and lacing pattern.

It is recommended that the spokes be checked and tightened more frequently than a normal bicycle. If a very hard bump is hit at high speeds, check the spokes.

We use the spokes supplier which is also used by Giant Bikes. On the CCS we have improved the spokes fit to better match the flange of the hub motor.

We sent the actual motor to the supplier and had them custom fit the spokes. Also the spokes/rim setup can be interchanged with 13G or 12G spokes so any bike shop can service the spokes. We also now include 4 extra spokes and nipples with each CrossCurrent S bike.

We are continuously studying how the bike is used and finding ways to improve every aspect of the bike.

Thanks,
-Tora
Interesting, thanks for sharing. I should be getting my new and improved CrossCurrent AIR this weekend according to the website and will report any problems to this forum if I find any. The new batch of AIRs apparently have black spokes but not sure if this indicates a new brand/type or just a paint job.

AlexNC
2 weeks ago

Agreed, the Juiced Cross Current is a good value, other than the rear wheel spoke issue I have no complaints. Some folks might be willing to spend considerably for a more established brand. Maintaining build quality and consistency is no easy task, I think many of the newer ebike companies are realizing this. There is still a reluctance from LBS to sell and/or repair ebikes so that isn't going to help either.
After my conversation with Juiced Bikes I feel a lot more confident in buying the new Cross Current S. This is an email conversation I just had with Tora at Juiced Bikes...

Me:
I have heard that broken spokes are common with your bikes. Have you addressed this with the new batch of Cross Current S and Air bikes?

Tora:

The CrossCurrent line of bikes travel at much higher speeds (nearing 30mph) than a normal bike and also can accept very high tire pressures of like 85psi, making the tire rock hard, but low ruling resistance. The load on the spokes are much higher than normal.

We have some reports of broken spokes, but the spokes will not just snap off for no reason. For reference we have had no broken spokes reported for the OceanCurrent which uses the same motor, spokes and lacing pattern.

It is recommended that the spokes be checked and tightened more frequently than a normal bicycle. If a very hard bump is hit at high speeds, check the spokes.

We use the spokes supplier which is also used by Giant Bikes. On the CCS we have improved the spokes fit to better match the flange of the hub motor.

We sent the actual motor to the supplier and had them custom fit the spokes. Also the spokes/rim setup can be interchanged with 13G or 12G spokes so any bike shop can service the spokes. We also now include 4 extra spokes and nipples with each CrossCurrent S bike.

We are continuously studying how the bike is used and finding ways to improve every aspect of the bike.

Thanks,
-Tora

Greg Palmer
2 weeks ago

There's some great things to the Bosch motor. I just sold an Electra Townie Go! Mainly because I grew to hate the top speed cutout. When you hit 19+ mph it felt as if you ran into wet cement. Too bad , great Hill climbing motor but just no fun to commute , they need to do something !

Philip Samaniego
2 weeks ago

I like having a close look. I stay more informed with every video. Thanks man!

Aziz Messaoud
2 weeks ago

Why don t you make a graphene bike review

Aziz Messaoud
2 weeks ago

Hey .please make the super 73 scout & rose ave EBIKE PLEASEEEEEE

Michigan Mister
2 weeks ago

can you explain the "adapters" deal with the valve stem? also, you always mention "frame flex" with the step through's, even with the battery over the rear wheel, is it honestly such a big concern for just "cruising"? thanks buddy-

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

I think the valve is for Dunlop tubes, that's what Chris (Propel Bikes) told me. The model reviewed here does reflect the final consumer edition closely but not perfectly, I shot this in May and they have only just now begun selling them, I had a press embargo to honor so during that time little things might have changed like the inner tubes in the US vs. the sample bike from Europe. As for frame flex, I don't think it's a big deal for medium and low speeds and especially for cruising... more of a deal for mountain bikes or if you have a heavy load and start to experience speed wobble (where the front wheel shimmies and resonates with speed, ultimately crashing you). I mention it because it is a compromise or consideration... but it's relatively minor with this particular bike, and you could reduce it by opting for the mid-step or high-step frame styles.

Crazy Lenny's Ebikes
2 weeks ago

We have been expecting this model for few months and we are delighted to offer this to our customers. BH Xenion City Wave was one of the top sellers and once we sold out of them, we were looking for a step-thru bike that is high-quality yet affordable. BULLS has done a great job with this bike and the fact that they offer 500 Whr powerpack with this bike is really cool.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

I agree with you, wouldn't be surprised if this became one of the more popular Bulls ebike models. How is your new store doing?

Tracey McNeel
2 weeks ago

Idea: An e-bike with a carbon belt drive.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

That's a great idea! A few of them have created models that do indeed use a carbon belt drive (usually from Gates) and internally geared hubs or even continuously variable transmissions. Here's one with both: https://electricbikereview.com/riese-muller/charger-mixte-gt-touring-hs/ but there are many more on the site, just search for NuVinci or Gates :)

frank doster
2 weeks ago

nice

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Totally, this one hits a sweet spot :D

Ebiking Now
2 weeks ago

Looks so modern!
Will you be getting any of the eMTB from 2018 lineup?

Ebiking Now
2 weeks ago

True, I like that idea! That's more helpful to the consumers, and especially for us Aussies since we get things so much later. Love your work! Hope to one day see how you run all of this

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Yeah, I sort of review nonstop but try to focus on current year models, in the case of this review I actually covered it in May but was asked to hold off on publishing until they were in stock and ready to sell in the US. My goal is to help people navigate and select from products that are ready for purchase vs. exploring what's coming or might be (like Kickstarters and stuff... even though I have done a few reviews of prototypes)

Renzo Riga
2 weeks ago

$2800 and cost-saving measures left and right...what do you consider the best value for money in the market today?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

That's such a difficult question because it depends on budget and how the bike would be used. There are plenty of $1,500 ebikes that offer great value for people who don't ride as far or as frequently (see Rad Power Bikes, Voltbike, Juiced Bikes, and Magnum as the price rises)... but if you need the bike to perform on a daily basis, need, fenders, lights etc. and maybe ride further, then the Cross E here is at or near the top of the list. Again, not that these other products couldn't also be reliable and capable... they just aren't using the same systems). I'm a big fan of Bosch based on how it feels and how you interact with it as a user but I constantly hear shops saying that they are also reliable which goes a long way to earning my trust. Not just the initial purchase and support, but also backward compatibility, their Magura service partner in the USA, and their long-term support for parts and stuff, that's easy to overlook at first blush with a range of bike products with different price tags but I feel that it's important and worth paying for if you need a reliable form of transportation so to speak.

Stan Ko
2 weeks ago

How to order this e-bike.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

I'm not completely sure, maybe reach out to Bulls to find a local dealer? They could order the size and style you want. Here's their website: http://www.bullsebikes.com/edealers/ if you can work with a local dealer, they will help you get fitted and offer great support, but there are some shops that also sell online if you don't live near a dealer.

James Mason
2 weeks ago

Good to see a new video you must be busy

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hi James! Yeah, I have been traveling and filming nonstop for the past three weeks. Just got to a stable place and will be publishing new videos every day, got 40+ to do in the coming month and a half before Interbike :D thanks for saying hi

Rick James
2 weeks ago

This one being "inexpensive"...how does that compare to the RadCity I have? I am surprised how well built the RadCity is, so wondering what an extra $1000 would get me for this BULL Cross E bicycle. Thanks!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Great question Rick, I feel like Rad Power Bikes is doing a great job and has solid products that seem to be holding up well. They are a leader in the space and able to sell for less because they go direct. So you end up doing more of the setup and maintenance on your own or with a possibly reluctant shop vs. a focused dealer. Some of the areas that it wins aside from having a lower price is how quiet it is and that it has a throttle (if you're okay with Class 2 vs. Class 1 where you live). I built a tool to help compare ebikes side by side and you can see the RadCity vs. the Cross E with this link: https://electricbikereview.com/compare/items/88616,91984

To help clarify, I have listed some of the differences here for you: compared to the Cross E, the RadCity drivetrain has one fewer gears, there are more exposed wires, you can't get a deep step-thru frame and even their mid-step is higher (too high for some customers who have left comments), it only comes in two sizes vs. four, it's slightly heavier, uses mechanical disc brakes vs. hydraulic which don't have adjustable levers and require more hand strength to operate, doesn't come with a keyed-alike lock, isn't as capable at climbing based on switching gears and probably won't go as far per charge despite having a higher capacity battery, the battery isn't as cleanly integrated and may not be support as long, nor are the fenders as well secured, there's no chain cover and overall, the system is just less refined... you can't remove the display and interacting with it isn't as quick or seamless in my opinion.

For someone who takes care of their bike, desires value, wants that throttle, is willing to setup themselves, fits the higher frames, appreciates the look etc. the RadCity is great. It's one of many good products on the market today and sometimes comparing is less about price or style vs. having a dealer or appreciating a different drive system. Based on my experience with Bosch and hearing from many sources, it is one of the most reliable systems out there but gearless hubs also work well and are known for being reliable too. I call the Cross E "inexpensive" in this video relative to the systems it offers more than where it's positioned in the overall market. You can get ebikes for under $1k or even make them these days... but it's difficult to find a Bosch powered ebike for under $2.5k and this one has lots of great supporting systems and sizes. I hope this helps to clarify. I'm glad you're doing well with your RadCity! It's a solid bike :)

Alfred lucky
2 weeks ago

Long time to see you doing this. I like it you're back.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Thanks Alfred! I was driving from San Francisco to Portland, Seattle, Vancouver Canada, and down to Utah. Shot 40 new models which I will be posting in the coming months on a daily basis :D

NYangryguy
2 weeks ago

Way more quiet with that shift sensor. I am on a home theater pc with 7.1 surround to when I listen to your stuff it usually makes me cringe with anything you do mid drive and no shift sensor. This one I am impressed.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

I think part of the quiet shifting has to do with the smoother, weaker, Bosch Active motor and the efficiency and ease of terrain I was riding on. All Bosch motors have shift detection but the CX models are just so zippy and powerful that there is still some mashing. Glad you liked what you heard/saw though :D

Theo Wink
2 weeks ago

It's the hand from the Adams family
!
No pun attended ..Good neutral reviews,as always.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Thanks! Doing my best, lots more new content on the way, some really fun unique rides and adventures mixed in with the bikes ;)

mattyj342111
2 weeks ago

wow thank you for the great reviews and for getting back to me

Propel Electric Bikes
2 weeks ago

Great to see more sub 3k Bosch powered bikes!

Btw - the tires have a Dunlop valve. That funny thing we were talking about on the Kalkhoff. It's pneumatic like the Schrader Valve, but the threads are like the Presta Valve.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hmm, thanks for the tip Chris! I was wondering what the deal was... Even though I have spent so much time with experts like you looking at all of these ebikes, I still feel like I learn something new all the time :D

CCLASH GOD
2 weeks ago

We want more trikes

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hey Rick, one of my favorite electric trikes is the Sun Traditional conversion: https://electricbikereview.com/sun-bicycles/24-traditional-electric-tricycle/ it's comfortable, has a basket, and just feels fun

Michigan Mister
2 weeks ago

I got a Pedego trike for my 81 year young mother. she has minor balance issues, but other wise amazingly healthy. the bike is strong, simple to operate, and built extremely well. absolutely NO problems with safety- she LOVES it, check it out Rick. good luck to your Mom!

Rick James
2 weeks ago

I just got a RadCity for me and am looking for a Trike for my 75yr old mom. Any suggestions for an older mom of that age? She is strong and everything, but I just want to make sure she is safe. Right now I use a BoostedBoard Skateboard or the RadCity. I just need her to be able to come along safely....so Trike is my choice for her....so now I need to find one. =)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Hi Finn, I'll keep an eye out for trikes! Any in particular that you're interested in? Here's the list I have covered so far: https://electricbikereview.com/category/trike/

mattyj342111
2 weeks ago

where have you been no vids for over a week

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

Sweet! Thanks for letting me know that you enjoy these, I do it to help people discover and navigate what I feel is a positive technology but also try to keep it fun, there are some really cool interesting ones coming up including another OHM where we go mountain biking and the Teo fat bike which is a well made but relatively affordable online type of thing... I went to Vancouver Island for that review and met a random person from the Internet and we had an adventure since he owned the bike!

ken duncan
2 weeks ago

Been in EBR withdrawal of late. Good to know you'll be uploading more reviews!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 weeks ago

I drove from Los Angeles to Seattle, Vancouver Canada, Back to San Francisco, Utah, and then Colorado. I'll be publishing reviews on a daily basis for the next month and a half before Interbike :)