BULLS Cross E Review

Bulls Cross E Electric Bike Review
Bulls Cross E
Bulls Cross E Bosch Active Line Mid Drive Ebike Motor
Bulls Cross E I Rack With Spring Latch Pannier Blockers Battery Slot Fuxon Led Light
Bulls Cross E Adjustable Angle Stem Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Bulls Cross E Sr Suntour Nex E25 Spring Suspension
Bulls Cross E 10 Speed Shimano Alivio Drivetrain
Bulls Cross E Rack Mount Bosch Electric Bike Battery Powerpack 400
Bulls Cross E Plastic Chain Cover
Bulls Cross E Rear Mount Adjustable Kickstand Tektro Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Bulls Cross E Bosch Ebike Battery Charger
Bulls Cross E Stock Mixte
Bulls Cross E Stock Diamond
Bulls Cross E Electric Bike Review
Bulls Cross E
Bulls Cross E Bosch Active Line Mid Drive Ebike Motor
Bulls Cross E I Rack With Spring Latch Pannier Blockers Battery Slot Fuxon Led Light
Bulls Cross E Adjustable Angle Stem Ergonomic Grips Bosch Intuvia Display
Bulls Cross E Sr Suntour Nex E25 Spring Suspension
Bulls Cross E 10 Speed Shimano Alivio Drivetrain
Bulls Cross E Rack Mount Bosch Electric Bike Battery Powerpack 400
Bulls Cross E Plastic Chain Cover
Bulls Cross E Rear Mount Adjustable Kickstand Tektro Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Bulls Cross E Bosch Ebike Battery Charger
Bulls Cross E Stock Mixte
Bulls Cross E Stock Diamond

Summary

  • Well priced considering the quality Bosch-made electric drive system, four frame size choices, and three frame styles (high, mid, and low-step)
  • Integrated LED lights and premium Continental tires with reflective sidewall stripes help to keep you visible in dark riding conditions
  • Packed with useful accessories such as fenders, an adjustable kickstand, adjustable stem, rack-mounted mini pump, and keyed-alike cable lock
  • The Bosch Active Line Cruise motor doesn't offer as much torque but operates more quietly and conserves energy, rack-mounted battery positions weight high and rear vs. low and center

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

BULLS

Model:

Cross E

Price:

$2,799

Body Position:

Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting, Touring

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Motor and Battery, 5 Years Frame

Availability:

Europe, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

59.2 lbs (26.85 kg)

Battery Weight:

5.8 lbs (2.63 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.8 lbs (3.99 kg)

Frame Material:

7005 Aluminium Alloy

Frame Sizes:

17.7 in (44.95 cm)18.9 in (48 cm)19.7 in (50.03 cm)20.9 in (53.08 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

Wave: 18" Stand Over Height, 22.5" Reach

Frame Types:

Step-Thru, Mid-Step, High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Gloss White and Blue Accents

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour NEX-E25 DS HLO Spring Suspension, 63 mm Travel, Lockout Adjust, 100 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Frame Rear Details:

142 mm Hub Length, 9 mm Skewer with Quick Release

Attachment Points:

Rear Rack Bosses, Fender Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Alivio RD-T4000SGS, 11-34 Tooth Cassette

Shifter Details:

Shimano Acera SL-M310 Triggers on Right

Cranks:

SR Suntour, 170 mm Length, 18 Tooth Chainring

Pedals:

Wellgo 884DU Plastic Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

Semi-Integrated, Threaded, 1-1/8"

Stem:

Alloy, 90 mm Length, Quill 180 mm, Adjustable Angle 0° to 60°

Handlebar:

Alloy, 600 mm or 620 mm Width, 25° Up, 37° Sweep Back, 25.4 mm Bore

Brake Details:

Tektro HD-M285 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Back Rotor, Tektro Levers with Adjustable Reach, Two-Finger

Grips:

Velo Rubber Ergonomic

Saddle:

Selle Royal Freeway City

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

Bulls DDM-1, Double Wall, Alloy, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14G Front 13G Rear, Stainless Steel, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Continental E-Contact Reflex, 42-622, 28" x 1.6"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

73 PSI Max Inflation, Reflective Sidewall Stripe, Safety Plus Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

i-Rack with Spring Latch and Slide Holes (25 kg Max), SKS Rookie Mini Pump, Rain Force Plastic Fenders, Plastic Chain Cover, AXA Cafe Lock, Flick Bell on Right, Integrated 6 Volt LED Headlight, Integrated Fuxon LED Back Light, AXA Cable Lock (All Locks Use the Same Key), Adjustable Length Kickstand, Sticker Slap Guard

Other:

Locking Removable Battery Pack

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Bosch Active Line Cruise

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

500 watts

Motor Torque:

50 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Panasonic

Battery Voltage:

36 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

13.4 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

482.4 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium Manganese Cobalt

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

40 miles (64 km)

Estimated Max Range:

130 miles (209 km)

Display Type:

Bosch Intuvia, Removable, Adjustable Angle, Grayscale, Backlit LCD, (Hold Reset and i to Enter Settings)

Readouts:

Speed, Assist Level (Eco, Tour, Sport, Turbo), Battery Level (1-5), Odometer, Trip Distance, Estimated Range, Clock, Max Speed, Average Speed, Trip Time, Shift Assist Recommendation

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 5 Volt 500 mA Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Combined Torque, Cadence and Speed Measured 1,000 Times Per Second), (Eco 40% 35 Nm, Tour 100% 40 Nm, Sport 150% 45 Nm, Turbo 250% 50 Nm)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

Depending on your frame of reference, $2,800 may not sound like a bargain price, but considering the Bosch motor, upgraded 500 watt hour battery pack, advanced Intuvia display panel, and the many frame size and style options that this bike offers… I think it’s an incredible value. The Bulls Cross E is a city style ebike that would make an excellent commuting platform or casual neighborhood ride. It comes standard with nearly every accessory you could want and they all match and fit properly. It’s fairly comfortable thanks to a name brand saddle, suspension fork, ergonomic grips, and adjustable stem but starting with the optimal frame size and style should not be overlooked as they are generally not an option on cheaper products. When you combine the correct size with some well integrated comfort features, you end up with a bike that you can ride further before feeling uncomfortable, and that’s a huge deal on an electric bike rated from 30 to 100+ miles per charge. Instead of a one size fits all approach, the Cross E caters to your needs. Want the easiest frame to mount and don’t mind a bit of frame flex? Then the wave step-thru model is best… want to look a bit sportier and improve stiffness but still have an easier time mounting? Then the mixte mid-step model is best… trying to optimize stiffness, power transfer, and possibly make the bike easier to lift and hang on some car racks? Then the traditional diamond high-step is your best choice. As a guy, I love that the mixte frame looks a bit more masculine but still provides lower stand-over height and love that Bulls chose a color scheme that looks professional and appeals to both men and women. There are so many little details to discuss about this electric bicycle, and they are all listed in the stats section above and mentioned in the video, but they could be easy to overlook or not appreciate if you haven’t seen as many electric bicycles as I have. The only area I would even think about upgrading is the seat post. I’d consider swapping the 30.9 mm rigid Aluminum post with a suspension post to provide a bit more cushion because my back and neck are extra sensitive from a sports injury years ago. Keep in mind, if you think about swapping the post out, it will raise the minimum saddle height by a few inches and thus impact your fit. Only go for this if you don’t mind the saddle being a bit higher.

Driving the Cross E is an internally geared mid-motor from Bosch. It’s not their fastest or most powerful model, but it is their smoothest, quietest, and longest range because it sips power. The Bosch Active Line Cruise is the same size and weight as the high-powered Performance models but has a slightly different styled. It offers 200 watts nominal with peak 500+ watts and up to 48 Newton meters of torque. Compared to the CX motor which offers 75 Nm, it’s weaker, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. The Cross E was designed for smooth, paved environments where acceleration isn’t encumbered by rocks and trail obstacles. It moves efficiently, even without motor assistance, thanks to larger 700c (28″ diameter) wheels and hybrid tires. And the tires Bulls opted for here are made from puncture resistant material and have reflective stripes on the side. When you pair a locking short-travel suspension fork with those firm tires (rated to 75 PSI) you get a smooth coasting machine. I guess what I’m trying to convey here is that the Active Line motor fits the use case and build choices of the bike. Yep, it’s a bit slower and weaker, but it works just fine. And just like all of the other Bosch motors right now, it delivers shift detection to reduce strain on the chain, sprockets, and derailleur. With eight gears to shift through and a mid-level component group (Shimano Alivio), I feel that the overall pedaling experience and reliability are good.

Powering the Cross E is a Bosch Powerpack 500 rack-mounted battery (despite the demo model in the video having only a Powerpack 400). To me, this battery is almost overkill! Expect excellent range because of the Active Line motor and efficient tires. The battery contains Lithium-ion batteries that are known for being lightweight and long lasting, the pack weighs ~5.8 lbs and charges in roughly 4.5 hours from empty. You can charge the battery while mounted in the rack or slide it out and bring it into your room or office. Note that the first half of the battery charges faster and might only take an hour and a half or two to fill because the cells aren’t having to balance. Bosch offers two chargers and I cannot say for sure which one you’ll get with this ebike. They are both relatively light and compact but one puts out 4 Amps and the other just 2 Amps. Considering that this bike has the larger battery and nicer Bosch Intuvia display panel, I wouldn’t be surprised if it came with the 4 Amp. And you’ll have no problem taking that charger with you because the bike comes with a really great rack. Consider grabbing a trunk bag or panniers at your local shop. And, to really extend the life of the battery, I suggest storing it in a cool, dry location. Extreme heat and cold can wear the cells down more quickly. Part of what you’re paying for on this bike is the Bosch name which promises quality and longevity. Their battery designs are backward compatible so far which makes finding and replacing packs easier. You get a two-year comprehensive warranty on the bike because that’s what Bosch offers and I hear from shops frequently that they rarely ever have issues.

To operate the bike, just charge that battery and slide it into the rack interface. Make sure it’s locked securely and then press the power button on the display panel. The Intuvia display is my favorite, now that Bosch has a smaller Bosch Purion model, because it’s easy to read and has a USB charging port built into the right side. With a cheap adapter cable you can charge your phone on the go and take advantage of the high capacity battery. The display panel is greyscale but backlit by a faint blue glow. It can be swiveled forward and back to reduce glare while riding and even removed completely for safe storage! Considering that this bike weighs nearly 60 lbs, I really appreciate the quick release wheels, seat, battery, and display panel because they make it so versatile for transport or maintenance. The display panel has a bunch of settings that can be explored by holding reset and i together once it’s on, and you can navigate through the four levels of assist that it offers by pressing + or – on the independent button pad. This pad is positioned very close to the left grip, making it easy and safe to use while riding. It produces a tactile click which lets you keep your eyes on the road vs. looking down to the display for confirmation. I usually ride efficient Bosch powered bikes like this with the two lowest levels of assist but might explore the third (Sport) here because of the weaker motor. All in all, the display interface is great except that you cannot turn off backlighting. You can press the lightbulb icon to turn the integrated lights on or off, but not the backlighting of the display.

Other highlights of this bike include a cafe lock with cable insert that uses the same key as the battery pack, integrated lights that run off the main battery, plastic fenders that have extra support arms to keep them quiet (plastic is light and durable but tends to be noisier), a well-positioned kickstand with adjustable length, a bell, and hydraulic disc brakes. Getting up to speed, being efficient, and feeling comfortable are all important but stopping is critical. Hydraulic brakes tend to be easier to actuate and in this case, adjustable-reach levers allow you to dial in fit. Whether you have small hands, large hands, or wear gloves for part of the year, these levers are going to fit you well with a bit of quick adjustment. Staying clean really matters if you’re cycling to work daily (and have to deal with wet conditions) and so, in addition to fenders, Bulls has also included a plastic chain cover to keep your pant leg clean and snag-free. It may see minor and obvious but so many other bikes don’t do this (many which are mountain or trail bikes… but some city bikes as well). Coming back to that price point, yes, it’s way more than some of the online-only direct to consumer products. But you do get something for your money here. This is an electric bike that I would expect to last longer, perform better, and be safer than many alternatives. The convenience of integrated lights that won’t be left on accidentally or stolen so easily is great. The list of Pro’s and Con’s below goes into more details and links to some good accessories but the vast dealer network of Bulls retailers can also help you to get this thing setup right for your needs. Really think about the frame style that works best for your body and then pick the correct size. One final little note, they even threw in a mini-pump that fits into the rear rack! To me, that’s awesome, and makes this a candidate for e-bike touring. Big thanks to Bulls for partnering with me on this review and inviting me out to their headquarters for back to back test rides. It allowed for a better comparison of motors and appreciation for the differences between commuter models (of which they have several). Frame specifics for the Cross E here are: Wave: 45/50cm, Mixte: 45/50cm, Diamond: 48/53cm.

Pros:

  • This is one of the most feature complete electric bikes I have tested, especially at the $2,800 price point, you get lights, fenders, a bell, adjustable kickstand, mini-pump, and a cafe and cable lock that are keyed to match the battery so you don’t end up with extra keys weighing down your keychain (you get four copies of the key vs. just with many other ebikes)
  • It offers an exceedingly comfortable ergonomic experience through a combination of basic suspension fork, gel saddle, swept-back handlebar with ergonomic grips and adjustable-angle stem, consider adding a 30.9 mm seat post suspension for even more back and neck comfort if you ride on varied terrain (but note that it will raise the minimum saddle height by ~3 inches)
  • Your choice from four frame sizes and three frame styles (wave, mixte, and diamond) allows for proper fit and confidence when riding, you can optimize for stiffness and power transfer with the diamond frame or easy-approach and stand-over with the wave
  • Sometimes, plastic fenders can rattle and produce more noise than Aluminum or Steel but Bulls has opted for nicer fenders here with additional support struts so they aren’t so loud… I did hear the kickstand chatter a bit when I went off of the curb
  • Hydraulic disc brakes tend to require less hand strength and feel smooth and powerful, you get mid-level Tektro brakes on the Cross E and the levers offer adjustable reach to accommodate different hand sizes
  • In addition to a nice set of fenders, the Bulls Cross E also comes with a plastic chain cover to keep your right pant leg clean and snag-free
  • The Bosch Intuvia display panel is large and easy to read even if you’re sitting up straight and further away, I love that it has a Micr-USB port built in so you can charge your phone or other portable electronic device while riding, use cables like this for many devices and a USB-C or Lightening cable depending on your phone
  • With eight gears and a mid-level derailleur, you get enough cadence range for climbing or cruising at the 20 mph top assisted speed, the Bosch motor offers shift detection to keep it smooth and protect the hardware a bit more than many other ebikes I have tested
  • The rear rack is impressive, it uses standard gauge tubing, which should work for most panniers, and has two slots for lower clips or bungee cords
  • Bulls is an international e-bike company with many dealers and a solid two-year+ warranty, this means the bike should be assembled more professionally, fit to you, and supported over the long run
  • Overall, I like the color scheme that Bulls chose for this model because it’s gender neutral and professional, the black cables, grey battery, and motor casing all blend into the black frame

Cons:

  • The suspension fork is kind of basic with limited adjustability, it’s a spring design which weighs more but at least it comes with lockout so you can stop dive (when the bike tips forward under hard braking) and increase efficiency by stopping bob as you ride if the terrain is smooth
  • Weighing in at nearly 60 pounds (27 kg), this is not an especially lightweight electric bicycle, the fenders, rack, lights, kickstand, longer bars, gel saddle, mini-pump etc. all add up… but at least the battery and display panel are removable and both wheels have quick release for easier flat fixes and maintenance
  • If you opt for the wave step-thru frame style, there may be some frame flex because of the rear mounted battery (and this flex could increase if you load up the rack), it’s not the end of the world and I noticed a cross-bar reinforcing the lowest section of frame, but it is a compromise in strength to optimize for easy-mounting
  • The Bosch centerdrive motor systems use a smaller than normal sprocket which spins 2.5x per crank arm revolution and this tends to produce a bit more noise (especially at high RPM), the Active Line Cruise model is the quietest version because it isn’t as zippy or powerful as the Performance Line models but it still produces some extra noise
  • To save costs, some of the accessories are generic or off-brand including the fenders, non-locking grips, and lights but other areas are still high-end including the Selle Royal Saddle and AXA frame and cable lock
  • I didn’t have an issue with this during my test ride but have noticed that some adjustable angle stems can get loose over time if you ride on bumpy terrain, just keep an eye on the stem and consider swapping it with a rigid stem someday if you do have issues, it’s a good way to determine which angle and length you like by adjusting over time and then narrowing down and buying one that’s rigid
  • I’m not a huge fan of plastic pedals with rubber tread because they can get a little bit slippery in wet riding conditions, but at least they won’t scrape your shins if you slip off, these pedals are probably fine for urban riding and can be replaced with something like this that’s affordable and good looking
  • I love that the high-step and mid-step frames come with bottle cage bosses (and they all have a rack) but the deep step-thru model does not have them

Resources:

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Rooster
2 hours ago

Again, The question was should OP upgrade to a 17.4ah if they want to travel at assist level 3, with a 20mi commute, on hilly terrain with a single charge? The OP is not on flat land texas or throttle in the mountains of Colorado. Neither is the OP trying to travel 30+ mi at 30mph. Because you seem to be in a situation that is perfect conditions for an ebike (and not your exaggerated examples) doesn't make it universally applicable. Taking into factors that the battery should be charged ~85% and the motor starts to sputter under 30%, during real world performance, I suggest OP buy a 17.4ah battery for that situation. My situation also warrants a 17.4ah (21ah can't fit in s/t). I am considering a 17.4 battery and an 8.8ah backup. I'd carry the 8.8ah instead of a charger on longer rides and can be swapped out for the home stretch or errands with less bulk. Lots of local rides are atleast 20mi round trip through terrain, which I wouldn't feel confident doing on a 12.8ah battery. What made you go for the CC-S over the CC Air or light bicycle if you are always in eco boost?

Niche isn't bad, toys aren't just for kids, like supercars or 3d printers. CC-S is still probably the best sub $3k ebike but there are grey areas in the market as well. Are e-bikes bulky overpowered bicycles, slimmed down under-powered motorcycles, gas alternative, all terrain or road, etc? My state won't all ow me be register as a bicycle because it has motor assistance, and can't be a moped because it has pedal assist. Battery/mileage is always a limiting factor whether phones or teslas. I would compare Cross Current to the iPhone, the Cross Current S to the iPhone 3g, and hopefully the Cross Current 2020 will be the iPhone 4s. Advancements from CC -> CC-s, seeing prices for battery packs increase in size and decrease in price, and even kickstarter (see: delfast bikes), are encouraging but I don't think you could convince a college student to buy an CC-S over a beater car or moped.
Definitely the bigger the better but there is no reason in the world a battery this size should cost $1000 besides greed, Luna has proven that. You can buy a high quality 17 ah battery from them for just about half that, a little more but not much and there's something wrong with that picture.

ebikeHIgh
13 hours ago

My bad, I must be niche then. I always ride eco boost, 18-20 is plenty fast for me. I have a 21Ah battery too so I don't disagree with you both that having the bigger batteries is never a negative. Just seems like if guys want to go 30+ mph for 30+ mile commutes then it's not that the bike is a toy with a 12.8, it seems like they'd need something gas powered instead like an actual moped.

Again, The question was should OP upgrade to a 17.4ah if they want to travel at assist level 3, with a 20mi commute, on hilly terrain with a single charge? The OP is not on flat land texas or throttle in the mountains of Colorado. Neither is the OP trying to travel 30+ mi at 30mph. Because you seem to be in a situation that is perfect conditions for an ebike (and not your exaggerated examples) doesn't make it universally applicable. Taking into factors that the battery should be charged ~85% and the motor starts to sputter under 30%, during real world performance, I suggest OP buy a 17.4ah battery for that situation. My situation also warrants a 17.4ah (21ah can't fit in s/t). I am considering a 17.4 battery and an 8.8ah backup. I'd carry the 8.8ah instead of a charger on longer rides and can be swapped out for the home stretch or errands with less bulk. Lots of local rides are atleast 20mi round trip through terrain, which I wouldn't feel confident doing on a 12.8ah battery. What made you go for the CC-S over the CC Air or light bicycle if you are always in eco boost?

Niche isn't bad, toys aren't just for kids, like supercars or 3d printers. CC-S is still probably the best sub $3k ebike but there are grey areas in the market as well. Are e-bikes bulky overpowered bicycles, slimmed down under-powered motorcycles, gas alternative, all terrain or road, etc? My state won't all ow me be register as a bicycle because it has motor assistance, and can't be a moped because it has pedal assist. Battery/mileage is always a limiting factor whether phones or teslas. I would compare Cross Current to the iPhone, the Cross Current S to the iPhone 3g, and hopefully the Cross Current 2020 will be the iPhone 4s. Advancements from CC -> CC-s, seeing prices for battery packs increase in size and decrease in price, and even kickstarter (see: delfast bikes), are encouraging but I don't think you could convince a college student to buy an CC-S over a beater car or moped.

Dunbar
18 hours ago

Im saying that if you are 225 lbs looking to commute 20mi at power assist 2-3 in hilly terrain on a single charge, upgrade to the 17ah battery. I've given a real world account of usable miles with out motor cutout. Your theoretical stats are not very applicable to the proposition. Eco mode at 18mph is toy mode for the bike. Best for niche market

My experience with the original Cross Current on the 10.4Ah battery is similar to yours. I could drain the battery completely in 45 minutes on the top assist level. Figure 30-35Wh/mi. cruising at 25-28mph and you can see that 600Wh to go 22 miles is basically 100% DOD every day. And the bike gets a lot less fun to ride once you get to the last 25% of battery or so. It starts to really struggle going up hills. The 17.4aH battery charged to 80% once per day should handle that commute fine and last several years.

PCDoctorUSA
3 days ago

I just discovered this forum after watching way too many reviews. Information overload! I am certain there are other threads that cover this, so feel,free to direct me there if so. I could use some help finding the best ebike for my needs. Here goes! My ideal bike would have: a cruiser style or upright riding position, midstep frame, beefy tires, lights, fenders, cargo rack, long range integrated battery, dependable and powerful motor with 28 mph capability, front shocks, and an easy, intuitive shifting or CVT. It will mostly be used on the road but needs to be able to handle light trails. Twist throttle would be nice. Hub motor or mid drive, just want it to be proven, durable and well warrantied. American made would be a bonus. Does this ebike exist? Budget is flexible but $2500 to $5,000 is preferred. I’ll spend more if it can be justified. I am probably asking for too much here, but thought I should at least get some input from the forum members who know a lot more than me. Thank you for any and all feedback. Cheers!
With your price range, it shouldn't be difficult at all to satisfy your wish list. I know you said that this would primarily be used on the road but can you tell us is this going to be a commuter bike or are you going on a cross-country trek? If the former, how far is the commute one-way and is it a level ride?

LimboJim
3 days ago

I don't blame the chain for my breaks on the same bike, I believe it's "user acclimation" to up to 90 Nm of pedal assistance, which makes mindful shifting essential.

My rules for riding my higher-torque eMTBs, especially the ones with two chainrings:

Never shift to lower gears when climbing, or when pedaling fast on level terrain.
Ease up or stop pedaling briefly for ALL shifting, up or down.
Avoid cross-chaining like the plague - it's too easy to forget I'm on the larger chainring!
Keep the shifter accurately indexed - smooth shifting's extra crucial with added torque.
Check all chain links after each ride - the slightest bend can later break easily, even with "proper" shifting.
Clean & lube chain every couple or few rides, depending on conditions.
Expect to have to replace chains every couple hundred miles, and always ride with spare quick-links.

I found that even ebike-specific chains stretch fast with 75+ Nm of additional torque, and that I'd rather have to pedal harder when I'm in too high a gear for the climb I'm doing than to try to shift in the midst of the climb. Frequent shifting is way less necessary with high-torque assistance, IMO.[/QUOTE]

john peck
5 days ago

Hi John,

I know the feeling. The puzzled look on a roadies face after you pass them on your Cross current bike is priceless!

My inframe hides the batpak,(custom made) & my panniers hide the motor. The panniers stay bowed out with thin plastic
cutting board inserts. So it looks like I'm riding a fully laden grocery getter. This gray haired old guy just flies right by them up hill.
Priceless is the word.

1/1
Bob Valenzuela
5 days ago

Hi John,

I know the feeling. The puzzled look on a roadies face after you pass them on your Cross current bike is priceless!

Bob Valenzuela
5 days ago

I stumbled upon this thread a year late! I wonder what happened with the Fantom Cross 750 w Luna motor with
It is fast! I rode it to work this AM...14.5 miles over varied terrain at 22 MPH average speed. The best I have done previously is 20 MPH. When it's pulling 1200+ Watts I'm able to pedal up any of the inclines with very little loss of speed, but it does eat the battery reserve and the motor runs noticeably hotter, so I use the max setting sparingly. I decided to get the programming cable and will reprogram the assist levels and probably reduce the max AMP cut-off. I'd rather work a bit harder and extend the range.

But if you really want to go fast this bike will do it.

Court J.

Sweet! I stumbled upon this thread a year too late! Wonder what the bike looks like now? How does it perform a year later?

PCDoctorUSA
6 days ago

@mrgold35 I had a Topeak MTX Trunk Bag for a couple of years until one of the side pouches where I kept my dress shoes for work started to rip. Great bag but awkward to carry if I had to make a stop somewhere. If I go with the Yukon, replacing the tires will be my first task, and I'll let my LBS do the work. Looking at the Origin8 Supercells.

I've been fortunate in my road sharing experience and find that most motorists will move over to provide an additional buffer. However, there's always the occasional jerk that tries to polish his side mirror with my sleeve, or tries to beat me to the intersection so he can make a right turn without having to stop to wait on me to cross. A separated bike path is the way to go, but if it's a "multi-use pathway" like I have along a portion of my route, you have to put up with the soccer moms out walking 3 abreast, or the lone jogger that's weaving from side-to-side. Calling out "On your left!" is usually met with a WTF look. I recently got a bell, but it doesn't work on pedestrians with earbuds wedged in their ears.

I started to video all my rides with my GeekPro after a couple of close encounters with vehicles. Like many places, bicyclists are considered fair game for motorists in Hawaii and there's a definite lack of enforcement. Riding on the sidewalk is illegal in business districts, Waikiki, and where otherwise posted. Where it is allowed, bicyclists are required not to exceed 10 mph, which I can understand. I've seen videos on YT of some awesome bike infrastructure in California that makes me envious. I guess it will take another 1979 energy crisis (anyone here old enough to remember that one?) before Government seriously considers bicycles as a viable transportation alternative and makes the necessary investment. Sorry, time to get off my soap box.

Reid
7 days ago

Hello, Rambler! I am on the right coast (Miami) but went to Huntington Beach for a week in May of 1999 to assist the late, great Ralph Ricks to prepare his 1913 Model T speedster for The Great Race that year, a cross country time trial event. I served as a volunteer mechanic. I know my Ts to the letter (lol).

Huntington Beach is a truly wonderful place to be! Wish I were there again! So long for now, but please keep us posted with your adventures! You are made for adventure, no doubt of the same can-do stuff as Ralph.

john peck
1 week ago

I doubt you will get your cross current s in this batch. They are only shipping orders in the 1700's.

That's funny; I got mine, no problem,#2013. Where'd you get you get your information, Stromer?

---EDIT----

mid drive merv
1 week ago

Just in case anyone might like bulletproof Schwalbe Marathon Plus in 700c sizes, Bike Tires Direct email notification just informed me that for the next eight hours the Marathons are $33.99.

(I am not tire shopping, myself, because I bought a pair of Michelin Protek Urban 700c x 38 from BTD just last week, to install on a Juiced Cross Current S bike arriving (we hope) in early November.)

Thanks! I run the 700c on my Yamaha and they have indeed been near indestructible. Wish I had kept a diary on how many years I have had this set on the bike. But it has been years and there will likely be some failure, dry rot, or something soon. They have outlived my highest expectations. At that price, I shall march over and purchase my next pair.

Reid
1 week ago

Just in case anyone might like bulletproof Schwalbe Marathon Plus in 700c sizes, Bike Tires Direct email notification just informed me that for the next eight hours the Marathons are $33.99.

(I am not tire shopping, myself, because I bought a pair of Michelin Protek Urban 700c x 38 from BTD just last week, to install on a Juiced Cross Current S bike arriving (we hope) in early November.)

Molly
1 week ago

looking on their website it doesnt' show the Uv500 v3 any more.. my guess is that they are focusing on the cross current, ocean current and the hyperfat.

I just purchased a CCS in September.... I love its.. solid bike... and fast. but not really fitting your needs. Look into Magnum Bikes as well.

for your needs i'd look at a Tern or a Rad Wagon. I am not familiar with a Boda Boda and the doesn't list any real specs on their website, but looks like they would fit your needs. Find a local dealer and ask lots of questions.

I would highly recommend something with hydraulic disk breaks especially if your caring around a little one. Mechanical disk breaks are nice but you'll have to squeeze hard to stop quickly. Definitely make sure it has a 48v battery system as well.

from Tern the GSD looks awesome - https://www.ternbicycles.com/us/ but will not be out until 2018.
from Magnum I'd shy away from the cheaper bikes because they have an older battery system and have less torque. But they seem to be solid bikes.

if you can find a local bike shop. They will help you maintain and service your bike.

Andy

Thanks so much Andy,

I appreciate you taking the time to reply with all that information. I'm still waiting for Juiced to get back to me but it's been a couple days. I will check out the Tern & Agnus bikes. I'm looking for a dealer here in Vancouver that has a Radwagon so I can test drive it. I'm pretty tall (5 '10) so I need something that's not too tiny. Looking cute as I drive about is also important

Thank you Andy,
Molly.

PCDoctorUSA
1 week ago

@Andy_in_CA Did you buy your Cross Current S through a dealer or online? If the latter, I'm curious what kind of shape it arrived in and if you experienced any quality control issues. As for a mid-drive ebike, I really didn't look too close at those since it seemed like any mid-drive was easily over $2k, and then there's the whole tension on the chain issue. If the rear hub goes out on an ebike you can still pedal it home. Perhaps I'll revisit some mid-drives.

Andy_in_CA
1 week ago

If you have some good climbs you might want to look at a mid drive. I have a Cross Current S and I love it. My commute is 11 miles with some slight grades, and the rear hub (geared) does a decent job but its not where this bike excels. if i slow down or stop on a hill then start again, the motor is definitely being pushed to hard and I have to gear down and take is slow. Its good in flat outs and cruising at higher speeds.

The mid drives will do better for you on the hills especially if you need to start and stop on a grade.

I would try and test drive a mid drive if you can but 5% grade doesn't sound too bad.

my .02

Andy

Andy_in_CA
1 week ago

looking on their website it doesnt' show the Uv500 v3 any more.. my guess is that they are focusing on the cross current, ocean current and the hyperfat.

I just purchased a CCS in September.... I love its.. solid bike... and fast. but not really fitting your needs. Look into Magnum Bikes as well.

for your needs i'd look at a Tern or a Rad Wagon. I am not familiar with a Boda Boda and the doesn't list any real specs on their website, but looks like they would fit your needs. Find a local dealer and ask lots of questions.

I would highly recommend something with hydraulic disk breaks especially if your caring around a little one. Mechanical disk breaks are nice but you'll have to squeeze hard to stop quickly. Definitely make sure it has a 48v battery system as well.

from Tern the GSD looks awesome - https://www.ternbicycles.com/us/ but will not be out until 2018.
from Magnum I'd shy away from the cheaper bikes because they have an older battery system and have less torque. But they seem to be solid bikes.

if you can find a local bike shop. They will help you maintain and service your bike.

Andy

Carterk
2 weeks ago

Visited a lbs yesterday, where I test rode the Cube Cross Hybrid Pro Allroad. First ride on a Bosch system, I liked it and was surprised by how quiet it was after hearing from numerous sources that noise was an issue with Bosch. Anyway, they also had the Giant Quick-e, which I'd ridden previously, liked, and is still maybe my first choice (I'm putting off my purchase till spring and better Seattle weather.)

In talking with the salesperson, I found out that the brakes on the 2018 are ebike specific and will be hooked to the rack-mounted taillight to indicate when the rider is braking- cool! Also, the new derailleur is the Shimano Shadow model that lets the user flip a lever to tighten the chain. These two features are worth the $50 increase imho.

Keith Kunz
2 weeks ago

Hi Tora,
My bike falls into category 1. and the 17.4ah battery doesn't seem to lock in, no matter what pressure is applied or how the key is jiggled. I watch the video from Luis about 20 times to make sure I wan't missing anything.

I have sent in the email about this to the support team a couple of days ago, but have not gotten a reply.
I have a Cross Current S, with 17.4Ah battery. Is there a new mount interface for the battery that we can request? I have been waiting on a fix for the bike for >1 month.
Was hoping to get a response, or a phone call, now that problem is better understood.

We notice some users have some difficulty with the battery install and some intermittent power over bumps. We have had a little bit of time to understand the issue. Here is why there are some tight fitting battery packs.

The down tube of the frames are extruded like pasta then cut to the length required. The tubes are then CNC cut out. Basically its a precise drill that cuts out that battery cavity section.

The big packs (17.4 and 21.0 Ah) we make our selves and have more control.

The standard packs 8.8 Ah and 12.8 Ah packs we buy from Reention (http://www.reention.com/product/2) the battery case, the upper and lower interface bits. The interface bits get screwed into upper and lower slots of the cavity that is cut out of the frame.

When you insert the battery, it should snap in and lock. Everything has to be millimeter precise or the pack will:

1. Rattle around and disconnect over bumps.
2. Be too tight and does not set all the way in and disconnect over bumps.

The tricky part from the manufacturing standpoint is that the parts are changing at different rates but they all have to come together with millimeter precision.

So the cavity of the downtube can be adjusted by adjusting the numbers in the CAD file which is used to CNC cut the tube, easy. The plastic parts are basically not changeable by us. they are injection moulded and sent to us, so we just buy it. Hard.

The thing is the company making the case and the battery parts sometimes make tiny changes to the design. We have to each adjust the CNC to the plastic parts. All this creates massive confusion, on a few of the Air bikes the section is a little too tight.

We have checked all the bikes as they come off the line and the battery can go in and lock solidly in place, yes but it is quite tight. Tight is better as the interface parts are plastic and can compress over time. There has been some reports from other assemblers of the pack being so loose they fall out. We have the opposite problem.

Most all of the packs that lost power is because the pack is not all the way seated and locked in place. One way to test this is to insert the battery, then try to pull the pack out without turning the key.

1. If the pack comes out without turning the key. It WILL disconnect over bumps.
2. If the pack stays locked in and can’t be pulled out, it is very unlikely the pack will disconnect over bumps.

The tricky thing on some of the bikes is the pack is so tight that tricks some users from thinking the pack is locked in when actually it is not. It is something like when you slightly close a car door. It seems closed, but its not really all the way closed. You have to use a bit of force to get it to shut completely. We found if you install and remove it a few times it gets much easier to do as the plastic beds in a little.

In the future productions we will have this issue solved, by firstly more carefully understanding the battery and interface bits more carefully before doing the CNC work.

So what if the battery still cannot sit in totally and lock in place even after pushing with more force? Contact our Tech support again and we have several ways to improve it and can get 100% of them to work normally.

Bryan
2 weeks ago

Bryan, since we have similar Cross Current S, and same battery pack, i was curious what fix they provided you. did they change the battery mount? was it a successful fix?
Hi Keith,

They said something about needing to adjust the way that the battery makes contact to the bike. Some adjustments needed to be made. I've been in and out of town this week so I'm hoping to do a 20 mile test run tomorrow.

Keith Kunz
2 weeks ago

Hi Tora,
My bike falls into category 1. and it doesn't seem to lock in, no matter what pressure is applied.
I have sent in the email about this to the support team, but have not gotten a reply.
I have a Cross Current S, with 17A battery. Is there a new mount interface for the battery that we can request? I have been waiting on a fix for the bike for >1 month.
Was hoping to get a response, or a phone call, now that problem is better understood.

Keith

"Most all of the packs that lost power is because the pack is not all the way seated and locked in place. One way to test this is to insert the battery, then try to pull the pack out without turning the key.

1. If the pack comes out without turning the key. It WILL disconnect over bumps.
2. If the pack stays locked in and can’t be pulled out, it is very unlikely the pack will disconnect over bumps. "

Dunbar
2 weeks ago

for me its a safety thing. I don't' feel like people can see me if they are parked and opening doors or pulling out... The last thing I want is a "door prize" on the way to work.Andy

I ride in the same area as you (Venice/Santa Monica) and I have no qualms about going 25-28mph in the bike lanes if conditions permit me to do so safely. I’ve done over 40k miles of cycling on these roads so I know the danger zones (and generally choose only roads with good bike lanes.) Once you get enough miles under your belt you develop a sixth sense of when a driver is about to do something stupid. I definitely ride much more defensively these days after having hit a couple of cars on my road bike. Good lighting makes a big difference too, especially for left cross avoidance.

Keith Kunz
2 weeks ago

That's great! I got my bike back with repairs too. I haven't had a chance to test it yet but I plan to make use of it this upcoming week!

Bryan, since we have similar Cross Current S, and same battery pack, i was curious what fix they provided you. did they change the battery mount? was it a successful fix?

Dunbar
2 weeks ago

Following the initial rush of doing 30mph & challenging the capabilities of my CCS, I discovered it's just as much fun to doddle along at 10 or 12 mph.

I’ve got about 7k miles on my original Cross Current. I still find the top two assist levels the most fun. But I find it challenging to get a workout at the higher assist levels so I still spend a lot of time riding in eco to assist level 2.

Baron Of Hell
2 months ago

I think you should try rigging your bike with c4 to deter thieves. They'll never take another bike after being blown to hell. Insurance will cover any damage to the bike.

Greg Palmer
2 months ago

There's some great things to the Bosch motor. I just sold an Electra Townie Go! Mainly because I grew to hate the top speed cutout. When you hit 19+ mph it felt as if you ran into wet cement. Too bad , great Hill climbing motor but just no fun to commute , they need to do something !

Philip Samaniego
2 months ago

I like having a close look. I stay more informed with every video. Thanks man!

Aziz Messaoud
2 months ago

Why don t you make a graphene bike review

Aziz Messaoud
2 months ago

Hey .please make the super 73 scout & rose ave EBIKE PLEASEEEEEE

Michigan Mister
2 months ago

can you explain the "adapters" deal with the valve stem? also, you always mention "frame flex" with the step through's, even with the battery over the rear wheel, is it honestly such a big concern for just "cruising"? thanks buddy-

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I think the valve is for Dunlop tubes, that's what Chris (Propel Bikes) told me. The model reviewed here does reflect the final consumer edition closely but not perfectly, I shot this in May and they have only just now begun selling them, I had a press embargo to honor so during that time little things might have changed like the inner tubes in the US vs. the sample bike from Europe. As for frame flex, I don't think it's a big deal for medium and low speeds and especially for cruising... more of a deal for mountain bikes or if you have a heavy load and start to experience speed wobble (where the front wheel shimmies and resonates with speed, ultimately crashing you). I mention it because it is a compromise or consideration... but it's relatively minor with this particular bike, and you could reduce it by opting for the mid-step or high-step frame styles.

Crazy Lenny's Ebikes
2 months ago

We have been expecting this model for few months and we are delighted to offer this to our customers. BH Xenion City Wave was one of the top sellers and once we sold out of them, we were looking for a step-thru bike that is high-quality yet affordable. BULLS has done a great job with this bike and the fact that they offer 500 Whr powerpack with this bike is really cool.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I agree with you, wouldn't be surprised if this became one of the more popular Bulls ebike models. How is your new store doing?

Tracey McNeel
2 months ago

Idea: An e-bike with a carbon belt drive.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

That's a great idea! A few of them have created models that do indeed use a carbon belt drive (usually from Gates) and internally geared hubs or even continuously variable transmissions. Here's one with both: https://electricbikereview.com/riese-muller/charger-mixte-gt-touring-hs/ but there are many more on the site, just search for NuVinci or Gates :)

frank doster
2 months ago

nice

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Totally, this one hits a sweet spot :D

Ebiking Now
2 months ago

Looks so modern!
Will you be getting any of the eMTB from 2018 lineup?

Ebiking Now
2 months ago

True, I like that idea! That's more helpful to the consumers, and especially for us Aussies since we get things so much later. Love your work! Hope to one day see how you run all of this

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Yeah, I sort of review nonstop but try to focus on current year models, in the case of this review I actually covered it in May but was asked to hold off on publishing until they were in stock and ready to sell in the US. My goal is to help people navigate and select from products that are ready for purchase vs. exploring what's coming or might be (like Kickstarters and stuff... even though I have done a few reviews of prototypes)

Renzo Riga
2 months ago

$2800 and cost-saving measures left and right...what do you consider the best value for money in the market today?

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

That's such a difficult question because it depends on budget and how the bike would be used. There are plenty of $1,500 ebikes that offer great value for people who don't ride as far or as frequently (see Rad Power Bikes, Voltbike, Juiced Bikes, and Magnum as the price rises)... but if you need the bike to perform on a daily basis, need, fenders, lights etc. and maybe ride further, then the Cross E here is at or near the top of the list. Again, not that these other products couldn't also be reliable and capable... they just aren't using the same systems). I'm a big fan of Bosch based on how it feels and how you interact with it as a user but I constantly hear shops saying that they are also reliable which goes a long way to earning my trust. Not just the initial purchase and support, but also backward compatibility, their Magura service partner in the USA, and their long-term support for parts and stuff, that's easy to overlook at first blush with a range of bike products with different price tags but I feel that it's important and worth paying for if you need a reliable form of transportation so to speak.

Stan Ko
2 months ago

How to order this e-bike.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I'm not completely sure, maybe reach out to Bulls to find a local dealer? They could order the size and style you want. Here's their website: http://www.bullsebikes.com/edealers/ if you can work with a local dealer, they will help you get fitted and offer great support, but there are some shops that also sell online if you don't live near a dealer.

James Mason
2 months ago

Good to see a new video you must be busy

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Hi James! Yeah, I have been traveling and filming nonstop for the past three weeks. Just got to a stable place and will be publishing new videos every day, got 40+ to do in the coming month and a half before Interbike :D thanks for saying hi

Rick James
2 months ago

This one being "inexpensive"...how does that compare to the RadCity I have? I am surprised how well built the RadCity is, so wondering what an extra $1000 would get me for this BULL Cross E bicycle. Thanks!

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Great question Rick, I feel like Rad Power Bikes is doing a great job and has solid products that seem to be holding up well. They are a leader in the space and able to sell for less because they go direct. So you end up doing more of the setup and maintenance on your own or with a possibly reluctant shop vs. a focused dealer. Some of the areas that it wins aside from having a lower price is how quiet it is and that it has a throttle (if you're okay with Class 2 vs. Class 1 where you live). I built a tool to help compare ebikes side by side and you can see the RadCity vs. the Cross E with this link: https://electricbikereview.com/compare/items/88616,91984

To help clarify, I have listed some of the differences here for you: compared to the Cross E, the RadCity drivetrain has one fewer gears, there are more exposed wires, you can't get a deep step-thru frame and even their mid-step is higher (too high for some customers who have left comments), it only comes in two sizes vs. four, it's slightly heavier, uses mechanical disc brakes vs. hydraulic which don't have adjustable levers and require more hand strength to operate, doesn't come with a keyed-alike lock, isn't as capable at climbing based on switching gears and probably won't go as far per charge despite having a higher capacity battery, the battery isn't as cleanly integrated and may not be support as long, nor are the fenders as well secured, there's no chain cover and overall, the system is just less refined... you can't remove the display and interacting with it isn't as quick or seamless in my opinion.

For someone who takes care of their bike, desires value, wants that throttle, is willing to setup themselves, fits the higher frames, appreciates the look etc. the RadCity is great. It's one of many good products on the market today and sometimes comparing is less about price or style vs. having a dealer or appreciating a different drive system. Based on my experience with Bosch and hearing from many sources, it is one of the most reliable systems out there but gearless hubs also work well and are known for being reliable too. I call the Cross E "inexpensive" in this video relative to the systems it offers more than where it's positioned in the overall market. You can get ebikes for under $1k or even make them these days... but it's difficult to find a Bosch powered ebike for under $2.5k and this one has lots of great supporting systems and sizes. I hope this helps to clarify. I'm glad you're doing well with your RadCity! It's a solid bike :)

Alfred lucky
2 months ago

Long time to see you doing this. I like it you're back.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Thanks Alfred! I was driving from San Francisco to Portland, Seattle, Vancouver Canada, and down to Utah. Shot 40 new models which I will be posting in the coming months on a daily basis :D

NYangryguy
2 months ago

Way more quiet with that shift sensor. I am on a home theater pc with 7.1 surround to when I listen to your stuff it usually makes me cringe with anything you do mid drive and no shift sensor. This one I am impressed.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

I think part of the quiet shifting has to do with the smoother, weaker, Bosch Active motor and the efficiency and ease of terrain I was riding on. All Bosch motors have shift detection but the CX models are just so zippy and powerful that there is still some mashing. Glad you liked what you heard/saw though :D

Theo Wink
2 months ago

It's the hand from the Adams family
!
No pun attended ..Good neutral reviews,as always.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Thanks! Doing my best, lots more new content on the way, some really fun unique rides and adventures mixed in with the bikes ;)

mattyj342111
2 months ago

wow thank you for the great reviews and for getting back to me

Propel Electric Bikes
2 months ago

Great to see more sub 3k Bosch powered bikes!

Btw - the tires have a Dunlop valve. That funny thing we were talking about on the Kalkhoff. It's pneumatic like the Schrader Valve, but the threads are like the Presta Valve.

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Hmm, thanks for the tip Chris! I was wondering what the deal was... Even though I have spent so much time with experts like you looking at all of these ebikes, I still feel like I learn something new all the time :D

CCLASH GOD
2 months ago

We want more trikes

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Hey Rick, one of my favorite electric trikes is the Sun Traditional conversion: https://electricbikereview.com/sun-bicycles/24-traditional-electric-tricycle/ it's comfortable, has a basket, and just feels fun

Michigan Mister
2 months ago

I got a Pedego trike for my 81 year young mother. she has minor balance issues, but other wise amazingly healthy. the bike is strong, simple to operate, and built extremely well. absolutely NO problems with safety- she LOVES it, check it out Rick. good luck to your Mom!

Rick James
2 months ago

I just got a RadCity for me and am looking for a Trike for my 75yr old mom. Any suggestions for an older mom of that age? She is strong and everything, but I just want to make sure she is safe. Right now I use a BoostedBoard Skateboard or the RadCity. I just need her to be able to come along safely....so Trike is my choice for her....so now I need to find one. =)

ElectricBikeReview.com
2 months ago

Hi Finn, I'll keep an eye out for trikes! Any in particular that you're interested in? Here's the list I have covered so far: https://electricbikereview.com/category/trike/