BULLS Lacuba EVO E8 Review

Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Electric Bike Review
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Gates Carbon Cdx Belt 50t Sprocket
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Rear Kickstand
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Bulls Ci Backlit Display Remote Button Pad
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ergon Gp1 Locking Grips Ergonomic
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sr Suntour Ecx E Air Fork Fuxon Headlight
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 I Rack Fuxon Led Back Light
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sks Rookie Mini Pump
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Wave Frame Deep Step Thru
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Large Removable Bmz Battery
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike High Step
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike Step Thru
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Electric Bike Review
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Gates Carbon Cdx Belt 50t Sprocket
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Rear Kickstand
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Bulls Ci Backlit Display Remote Button Pad
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ergon Gp1 Locking Grips Ergonomic
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sr Suntour Ecx E Air Fork Fuxon Headlight
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 I Rack Fuxon Led Back Light
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sks Rookie Mini Pump
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Wave Frame Deep Step Thru
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Large Removable Bmz Battery
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike High Step
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike Step Thru

Summary

  • A versatile urban electric bike well suited to commuting, touring and trekking because of its efficient mid-drive motor and larger than average battery capacity, durable internal gearing and belt drive
  • Available in five frame sizes and three frame styles including wave, mid-step and high-step diamond for improved fit and optimized mounting and control or stiffness and performance
  • Completely outfitted with high-end accessories and hardware including fenders, rack with mini pump, hydraulic disc brakes, Kevlar-lined tires, a lightweight air suspension fork and integrated lights
  • Solid warranty and growing dealer base in the US with European backing, room for improvement with battery lock design and charging port cover, no quick release on rear wheel

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

BULLS

Model:

Lacuba EVO E8

Price:

$3,999

Body Position:

Upright, Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting, Touring

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Motor and Battery, 5 Years Frame

Availability:

Europe, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

56 lbs (25.4 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

6.61 lbs (2.99 kg)

Frame Material:

7005 Aluminium

Frame Sizes:

17.72 in (45 cm)18.89 in (47.98 cm)19.68 in (49.98 cm)20.86 in (52.98 cm)22.83 in (57.98 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

18" Stand Over Height for Wave Model

Frame Types:

High-Step, Mid-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

Satin Silver with Gloss Black and Copper Highlights

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour SF17-NCX-E Air, 63 mm Travel, Lockout Adjust, 11 mm QR Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Nexus Inter8 Internally Geared Hub, 26T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Nexus Grip Shift on Right

Cranks:

SR Suntour, 50T

Pedals:

Wellgo C-098DU Plastic Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

FSA Tapered 1-1/8"

Stem:

Satori Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Swept Back, 600 mm or 620 mm Length, 5° Bend

Brake Details:

Shimano M395 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Ergon GP1 Locking, Ergonomic

Saddle:

Selle Royal Scientia M3

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

RYDE Double Wall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge Front 13 Gauge Rear, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Apple, 28" x 2"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Active Line K-Guard, Reflective Sidewall Tape, 35-70 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Velo Battery Protector Pad, Fuxon Integrated LED Lights, SKS Plastic Fenders, i-RACK with Pannier Blockers and Spring Latch with 25 kg Max Load, SKS Rookie Mini Pump, Plastic Chain Cover, Adjustable Length Kickstand

Other:

IP56 Ingress Rating, 2.5 lb 5 Amp Energy Bus Charger from BMZ, Gates Carbon Drive CDX Belt

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Brose E25

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

530 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

BMZ

Battery Voltage:

37 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

17.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

647.5 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

130 miles (209 km)

Display Type:

BULLS CI, Removable Backlit LCD Display

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Speed, Assist Level (None, Eco, Tour, Sport), Total Distance, Trip Distance, Trip Time, Trip Calories, Max Speed, Avg. Speed, Total Time, Time of Day, Average Motor Power, Average Rider Performance

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, Lights Button, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Cadence and Torque Sensing)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

The Lacuba Evo E8 is like an “everything electric bike” because it comes in five sizes, three different frame styles, has fenders, a rack, suspension fork, integrated lights, a large battery and an efficient mid-drive motor. I guess it’s not well suited to trails and mountain biking… but the motor used here, from Brose, is the same one that Bulls uses on their very capable full suspension mountain models! With 90 Newton meters of torque and a 250 watt nominal output, the bike is no slouch. What really sets it apart from some competing models is the internally geared hub running on a Carbon reinforced belt drive. You don’t have to worry as much about a derailleur getting bumped or a chain falling off. There’s no grease and oil to deal with and you can shift gears anytime (even at standstill). One trade-off with this setup is that the rear wheel uses bolts instead of a quick release skewer but the tires are higher quality Kevlar-lined models that shouldn’t be as susceptible to punctures from thorns or glass. Also, the front wheel does have quick release so maybe half the time it will still be easier to change the flat. Also worth noting is the compact mini-pump that clips into the rear cargo rack. Low tire pressure is a leading cause of pinch flats and can contribute to lower efficiency so having that pump with you at all times should further reduce instances of flat tires… just make sure you don’t leave it on the frame to get stolen at the bike rack :/

In my opinion, Bulls has done an excellent job outfitting the Lacuba EVO E8 with name brand hardware that will last longer and reduce weight while still hitting an impressive value price point. No, it’s not super cheap at just over $4k but the reflective sidewall stripes on the upgraded tires could save your life along with the integrated LED lights front and rear. The Selle Royal saddle significantly improves comfort when combined with the air suspension fork and adjustable angle stem… not to mention ergonomic grips (again name brand) from Ergon. You can spend a lot of money swapping saddles and changing touch points and end up with a bike that doesn’t look as good as this. The fenders are tight and have sturdy struts and attachment points on the rear rack so they don’t rattle. You get a chainguard that keeps your pants from rubbing on the belt, but even if this wasn’t here you’d stay a lot cleaner than if it was running a chain. Designing frames that have a cut-away for actually using a belt (since the belt can’t be unlinked like chains can) is expensive and I’m just amazed that they did it for five frame sizes and all of the different frame types. I especially like the step-thru and low-step wave because it’s a lot easier to mount the bike than swinging your leg up and over the rear rack (especially if you’ve got a trunk bag mounted there). This is an electric bike that should fit most riders and be more fun and secure for shorter petite riders like women. My girlfriend has hit her leg and crotch many a time riding other bicycles and it creates insecurity and she doesn’t want to ride as much. Yes, the wave model that I test rode and photographed for this review isn’t going to be as stiff as the mid-step or high-step diamond or as easy to mount on some car racks but at least she will want to go riding and this isn’t a bike that needs to be so stiff.

I love the battery and motor integration, both are tight so you don’t hear rattling and they blend right in with the frame. It only comes in one color scheme but it’s professional and helps the black battery and motor casing blend in… along with the black cables (many of which are routed through the frame to reduce snags). Even though this has a downtube battery, because it mounts up from the bottom, there are screws for mounting a bottle cage on all of the different frame styles. This is great because we all need hydration! Surprisingly, many electric bikes forego bottle cage bosses and while you can compromise with a bag or seat mount they just aren’t as easy to reach and sometimes don’t feel as secure to me. Another usability feature that this Bulls model offers that some of their others do not is the larger CI backlit display panel. Being larger, it’s much easier to read from afar and I absolutely LOVE that it’s removable. This will reduce instances of scratching and wear from sun and other weather when parked at the rack. The display even has a little Micro USB port at the bottom for charging your phone or other electronic devices. I sometimes use my phone for GPS directions so that’s really cool.

In terms of performance, the Brose motor is quiet, responsive and very efficient if you simply switch gears naturally as you ride (lower gears for climbing, higher gears for going fast). Inside the motor are gears to transform high RPM into powerful torque and you can hear some whirring as it spins but this is still one of the quieter motors out there to choose from (comparing to Bosch, Yamaha or Impulse). It doesn’t offer shift-sensing but that’s not as important since it uses a combination torque and cadence sensor and the drivetrain here is a geared hub vs. traditional derailleur with cassette. I like that both the motor and battery are low and center on all models of the Lacuba EVO E8 because some similar designs from competing brands opt for the rear rack battery which reduces your carrying capacity there and stands out more in my opinion while also shifting balance and raising the center of gravity. Accomplishing the preferred design here costs more but again, the price for this bike isn’t outlandish. Some minor improvements I would like to see however are the rubber flap that covers the charging port… It doesn’t stick down as easily as I’d like and could let water and dust in. The bike doesn’t automatically lock the battery in when you mount it and it would be a bummer if someone stole this because they are very expensive to replace. The key for locking the battery in is right there at the bottom bracket where the crank arms pass by and could easily get broken if you forget to remove it. I also feel like the Shimano Inter8 geared hub can be a bit wonky and take some getting used to, it doesn’t always shift immediately if you’re pushing down and this can cause confusion and over-shifting.

All things considered, this is a fantastic electric bike platform that’s at home as a very fancy comfortable neighborhood rider, a tuff urban commuter or even a touring or trekking ebike. There are solid electric bikes that offer similar performance for basic riding that cost half as much but this one will surely last longer and perform at a much higher level than those. Bulls offers an excellent two year comprehensive warranty along with five year frame coverage. They’re opening up more dealers in the US but have a solid global reputation from years of operation in Europe and Asia. From 2016 to 2017 they’ve introduced many more models and I can tell they are committed to delivering an excellent experience. That’s part of what you’re paying for here and why I’d strongly consider this model for my own commute in town. Just grab a nice pannier backpack or duffle style trunk bag and you’re set for 40+ miles of riding each day and impressively fast charging thanks to the 5 amp charger (most are just 2 or 4). It’s an electric bike that’s easy to get excited about and one that fits into the most widely accepted Class 1 category with 20 mph top speed in the US. Big thanks to Bulls for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • The bike is extremely well equipped, the design is polished and it comes in three frame styles (stiff high-step, easier to mount mid-step and approachable wave deep step-thru) and five frame sizes!
  • In addition to a range of frame styles and sizes that improve fit, there’s also an adjustable angle stem and relaxed curved bar with name-brand ergonomic grips on this bike
  • At over $4k this isn’t what most people would call affordable but considering the internally geared hub, brand name belt drive, integrated lights, reflective tires and high quality rack with a mini-pump I think it’s a good value for what it is
  • Most of the super commuters and touring electric bikes I test out that have fenders, racks etc. all weigh a bit more but at ~56 lbs this one isn’t bad and part of that is the air suspension fork… internally geared hubs also weigh more but are durable so it’s a good trade-off here, the battery is easily removable for reduced weight when transporting
  • Belt drives tend to stay cleaner than chains because they don’t require lubrication, they also run quiet and don’t drop (in part because this is the upgraded Gates CDX with center-tracking design)
  • In addition to the cleaner belt drive, you get tightly integrated plastic fenders and a nice chain guard to keep your shoes and pants clean even in wet conditions
  • I love the rack on this thing, it has pannier mounting tubes along the sides, a spring latch on top, an integrated mini-pump and it connects to the fender for added support and reduced rattling
  • It’s great that they designed the downtube in such a way that you can still mount a bottle cage for easy-to-reach hydration while riding, consider a trunk bag like this for carrying extra bottles
  • I was really impressed with the battery capacity offered on this and other Bulls electric bikes, you really could use this for long commutes or touring, the efficient mid-drive motor is a battery sipper compared to hub motors
  • It’s nice having a display panel to show your speed, assist level and power output but I’m super happy with the one they chose because it’s removable… that means less wear and damage at racks outside if you commute (just don’t misplace it), I also like that it has a Micro USB charging port in the bottom for charging your phone or other portable electronics!
  • Solid hydraulic disc brakes provide smooth powerful stopping power and the levers offer adjustable reach so you can use them easily even if your hands or fingers are smaller and shorter
  • The bike is already really comfortable but you could swap out the rigid seat post with a 30.9 mm suspension like this, just keep in mind it will raise the minimum seat height, I like the Selle Royal saddle that comes stock (it’s a bit larger and less firm than others)
  • I like that the tires have a kevlar puncture-resistant lining because it’s not much fun fixing flats and only the front wheel has quick release here (because the rear uses an internally geared hub, you’ll need tools to remove the bolts)
  • The charger outputs 5 amps so it fills the pack quicker than some others (which are just 2 or 4 amp) and I like that they went with the fancier magnetic EnergyBus port because it just pops out if you trip over it vs. tipping the bike or bending the pins

Cons:

  • Activating the bike requires two steps if you haven’t ridden for a while, press the power button on the downtube then up at the button pad, could be confusing at first if you haven’t charged the battery in a bit and can’t figure out why it’s not powering up ;)
  • I love that the battery pack locks to the frame for security but feel that the key is positioned in a vulnerable spot where the crank arm can hit it if you’re not careful
  • It’s nice that you can charge the battery while it’s on the bike but the rubber flap designed to cover the charging port at the base of the downtube doesn’t stay down very well, I feel its design could be improved
  • The battery pack slides up into the downtube so getting it out can be a little tricky and definitely requires two hands, you have to unlock it then sort of pull down (but not so hard that it hits the fender or ground if you aren’t careful)
  • I like that you can shift gears while at standstill on this bike because it has an internally geared eight speed hub but for the gear to actually change I’ve found you can’t be pushing very hard… so when riding I back off a bit when shifting (especially when climbing)
  • The Brose motor system uses cadence and torque measurements to activate and is fairly responsive but does not have shift sensing, that’s less of an issue on an internally geared hub drivetrain like the Shimano Nexus Inter8 here

Resources:

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PDieter
9 months ago

Court, I suspect that you don’t want to charge that battery with either port… I suspect the BMS only protects one side. I’m basing this on the experience that if your bms goes out you can reverse charge a battery still by rigging a cord for the other port.

Reply
Court Rye
9 months ago

Hmm, interesting feedback! Thanks for chiming in. I might have gotten some incorrect information or just misspoke. Would be good to confirm this with a dealer or as you suggest, just use the charging port that is exposed when mounted to the bike. That one is clearly going to work :)

Reply
Charging Brose Batteries
8 months ago

You are able to charge from either port.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Awesome, thanks for sharing your feedback on this :)

Pdieter
8 months ago

A little semantic help for you on the “affordable” stumble; it’s a “good value”. Keep up the good work.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Right… thanks, I do my best but there’s lots of room for improvement. I suppose that being around $5k+ ebikes regularly has had an influence on me and my language isn’t always on target (I do a little bit of editing before posting videos and stuff like this usually gets a second consideration). Here on the site I’ve got an “affordable” category that’s more rigid, the bikes have to be in the $1,500 range which I hope truly is “affordable” and not just “good value” ;)

Reply
Adam @ BULLS eBIKES
8 months ago

Hey Court,

Great review, as always! A couple updates and information bits that pertain to all the BULLS Brose mid-drive eBIKES.

  1. New software updates for Brose include a “wake” function, which means the bike can be turned on and off at the handlebar display control, in addition to the downtube.
  2. Which I mentioned in a previous reply is that the battery can be charged from either port. As you correctly assert, one plugs into the bike while inserted. The other allows charging to occur while inserted.
  3. The key is not necessary for reinstalling the battery, as long as the lever is in the open position. Typically this would be when the greatest risk for getting the key stuck or broken off would be.

Hope this helps clarify.
-Adam

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

This is very helpful Adam, thanks for chiming in as an official source and clarifying. I’ll keep this in mind for future Bulls reviews and welcome you to join in on the EBR forums and any future comments here :)

Reply
Adam
8 months ago

You bet Court. I’m trying to keep an eye on the forums. Lots of great questions and helpful feedback.

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Really appreciate you Adam!

Reply
Rusty
8 months ago

Court, Your review of the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 was most informative. I am a newbie to ebikes, and trying to learn all I can. Your technical reports are a big help in teaching us about the pros and cons about the different ebikes. My wife and I are senior citizens in our seventies, and I believe the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 seems to be the bike for us. We will be riding where there are some long grades in the high country. Question: If need be, can it be ridden with motor power only, or does it require some constant peddling? Keep up the good work. Regards, Rusty

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Hi Rusty! I sure do like the Bulls Lacuba E8 but it does require constant pedaling because it’s a Class 1 Pedal Assist bike vs. Class 2 which has throttle. BionX makes an excellent line of motors that have a throttle mode and you can buy them pre-installed on bikes from OHM and others, check out the OHM Urban XU700 here. It’s an awesome bike with the same step-thru frame… the company offers a good warranty and is a bit bigger and more reliable than some. Biria also makes a deep step-thru with the BionX system and I just finished reviewing theirs here. I hope this helps you out, sounds like you and your wife will have a great timeout there on bikes again and the electric motor should help flatten those hills ;)

Reply
Sanford Simmons
6 months ago

Your written write up states the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 2017 has a 350 watt motor. Is that true or is it a 250 Watt motor?

Reply
Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Sanford, great catch and I do apologize for the inconsistency between my writeup vs. the specs, I’ve fixed it! In short, the motor ranges from 250 to about 530 watts depending on power level selected and the signals being sent (pedal torque and speed). I think I made this error because the Brose system reminds me of Bosch in many ways which officially says 350 watts nominal but they use the exact same hardware as in Europe where it’s rated 250 nominal. Sometimes I feel like it’s marketing more than reality given the range of power possibilities. Hope this helps! The Lacuba is a solid choice but there are other drive systems out there worth exploring if you’re concerned :)

Reply
William Hamilton
5 months ago

Hi Court. I live in a level area near the beach. I want to take advantage of a new bike right of way along side a new light rail extension very close to home. Should I therefore avoid 28 mph ebikes? I’m 68 yrs. old and am also a bit concerned about crashing while going 28…I test rode a 28 mph model recently and it did seem a little hairy going that fast along side traffic on regular streets. Do folks regret gettiing a 20 mph model such as this model Lacuba after they’ve become accustomed to riding an ebike and then wishing they bought a faster model? I’ve enjoyed your reviews very much. Thank you for any comments.

Reply
Court Rye
5 months ago

Hi William! I have only ever owned 20 mph ebikes myself and never felt like I was missing out. For me it’s important to blend in, avoid breaking any rules (since I’m kind of a public figure) and be an ambassador for the space. I still really enjoy riding my unpowered bicycle and feel like that can be fast! If you’re someone who loves speed, needs to get to your destination as fast as possible or want to gain respect from cars (some people feel like if they ride the same speed as cars they aren’t challenged as much) then speed pedelec might be the way to go. I think it makes the most sense for people who ride on the shoulders of streets… You can ride them slower btw, it’s not like it forces you to hit the top speed. I just tend to get Class 1 ebikes since they are more plentiful and I ride on bike paths and occasional mountain trails. Hope this helps!

Reply
William Hamilton
5 months ago

Thank you for your remarks. Keep up the good work.

Albin Larsson
4 months ago

Hi Court, great review as always. I really enjoy your reviews on ebikes, you’ve helped me a lot learning about them and I’m gonna buy my first ebike this summer, it’s looking like it might be this one! I just have one question first. How are the gears on this bike when pedalling without electric assistance? Maybe you could give a comparison to another ebike and a regular bike? I don’t have a place where I can try this model out and I’m probably gonna be biking a bit without electric assistance as well so I’d like it to be at least decent. Thanks in advance! /Albin

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Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Albin, the eight-speed internally geared hub doesn’t shift as fast and hard as many traditional derailleur sprocket combinations but it won’t mash, come out of tune or get as dirty either. At ~56 lbs, this isn’t one of the lighter ebikes but it’s also not bad considering you get fenderd, rack and a suspension fork… if you added those options to another ebike it would probably weigh similar if it had similar specs. I really like the Lacuba EVO E8 and appreciate belt drive systems in general. The belt doesn’t bounce around or come off as easily and you with that eight speed, you can definitely pedal the bike unpowered just fine, the tires are efficient and the fork locks out if it is bobbing up and down and you want to conserve as much pedal efficiency as possible. I hope this helps to answer your question, I realize test riding before buying would be ideal but this is a high quality product. If it fits your budget and delivers the features you want then I think you’ll be happy with it. The Brose drive system is awesome and I like how clean the battery integration is here.

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Johnny Fixit
2 weeks ago

Hi Court,

This is my leading choice. I am intending to do long distance touring. My current bike is what you call a mid-step frame. With the mid-step, on days where I am on and off the bike a lot, I sometimes get hip pain. Do you think the wave model has too much flex for a long distance tourer? (Rider + Gear = 250lbs+)

Also in comparison to the Bulls Cross E with the Bosch system, would you still rank this as a good value? Do you think there’s enough to justify the additional cost of the Lacuba Evo 8 for a tourer?

Thanks.
Johnny

Reply
Court Rye
2 weeks ago

Hi Johnny, I think both could work well and although there’s sure to be a bit of frame flex, it’s not a deal killer at all. They are designed with balanced battery positions (even the rear rack battery on the Cross E). The battery capacity on the Lacuba EVO E8 is greater and I think Bulls is smoother and maybe more efficient thank Bosch in this case? If you go for the Cross E, I’d probably recommend getting a second battery pack. Depending on how far you plan on going, definitely bring your charger with and both have faster chargers (Bosch 4 Amp and Brose 5 Amp here). I think your interest in the Lacuba Evo E8 is spot on and would probably be my first choice given what you shared. I’d love to hear back about your real-world experience if you go this direction!

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Alberto Orchansky
1 week ago

I sent this mail to BULLS and to the dealer and wanted to share here as well:

I bought an LACUBA EVO E8 WAVE from Citrus Cycle, Kelly Demoline, Ladysmith, BC, Canada on May 31, 2017. The choice of this model was due to my physical conditions. A few years ago I had an accident suffering serious injuries in my neck. As a consequence, my neck is fused, limiting my head movement. I have been an active bicycle rider, both mountain, and road- all my life, but since the accident, I was not able to get back to riding anyone.

Meeting Kelly Dmoline from Citrus Cycles changed all this once he introduced me the EVO E8 Wave. Its riding position was just perfect for me, absolutely comfortable and the pedal-assisted feature made possible for me to get back safely to the road.

Unfortunately, and just within a couple of days, I had a terrifying and literally life threatening experience. While ‘testing’ the bike downhill on a paved road, reaching about 40 k/h (not pedaling) the bike started to wobble violently. Only thanks to the experience I have riding bicycles I was able to stop it safely.

The experience was so shocking that I immediately contacted Kelly Demoline, having decided to return the bike. He was very surprised about the issue but, without hesitation, was ready to take the bike back.

Overnight I thought about it, about how much the bike was going to give me back to my life, that I decided to keep it with the condition I set to myself to never get to 40 km/h again.

However, the problem subsisted at different speeds, 30, 25, 20 km/k and so. I kept trying to figure out what may be out of line to induce such a behavior. I have the bike checked in a bike shop without finding anything abnormal. All they did was to adjust the suspension fork pressure for my weight, 200 lbs. Finally, today August 15, 2017, with the odometer at 179 km I was able to induce and reproduce the problem myself AT ANY SPEED.

Riding the bike on a paved road with enough grade to force the bike to increase its speed, WITHOUT PEDALING, once reaching about 15 km/h start jiggling the handlebar left-right right-left quite fast. The movement will induce a wobble on the front end that will rapidly be transferred, amplified to the back, reaching its maximum where most of the weight is concentrated. I tend to think the weight and location of the battery are crucial components in this wave resonance / dynamic amplification problem.

The meaning of this is that just a pebble, pothole or any irregularity on the road may lead to a ‘handlebar jiggle’, inducing the wobbling effect AT ANY SPEED. That’s exactly why it happens to me so many times and at different speeds. I understand the problem is magnified due to the typical riding position of an urban type bike, where there is limited rider’s weight on the handlebars.

Another situation associated with the weight on the handlebars is when making a traffic signal: a single hand on the handlebar and very little control upon the jiggling/wobbling effect with the other hand.

To summarize, I do not believe there is nothing technically wrong or defective with my particular bicycle. However, I strongly believe there is a conceptual flaw in the design of this particular model, making it unsafe to ride it to the point that it should be discontinued and a recall issued.

Sincerely,

Reply
Court Rye
1 week ago

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, the steps you took, and how you were able to recreate speed wobble on the BULLS Lacuba EVO E8. I have experienced this phenomenon, or something similar to it, on many ebikes that have rear-rack batteries such as the MOAR eBikes 24/7 prototype. It can indeed be uncomfortable and perhaps even unsafe depending on how you ride. I think it has to do in part with the bike setup but also the rider weight distribution. The Lacuba EVO E8 offers lots of adjustability at the stem and seat-tube… plus, it comes in three styles (high-step, mid-step, and wave). There are probably specific size/style/geometry setups that are more susceptible to speed wobble and perhaps the bars can be sensitive with those setups and at certain speeds due to resonance, but the demo bike felt decent to me. I’m not sure this warrants a recall but I would advise you and anyone who rides the bike (or any bike) to really get to know how it handles and ride safety with protective gear. By the way, speed wobble can also happen on skateboards with looser trucks (especially at speed), I think that tightening your suspension probably helped… I’d be interested in the frame size, style, and your weight to help others who might be considering this bike.

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Alberto Orchansky
1 week ago

Thanks for your comments. I am very happy I got involved in this forum. I wish the circumstances would’ve’ been having a different tone. The Lacuba I have is the Wave model. This model has the lowest ‘step-through’ of any model. Due to my physical limitations, I cannot ‘mount’ a bike, a horse, donkey, motorcycle, or anything that requires ‘mounting’.

Buying this bike/model was a long process since I wanted to actually try it and compare with other brands/models. What I mean by ‘to try it’ is actually to ride it for a couple of hours or so, to get a true feeling of it. This was not done in a ‘city kind of environment around the block from the store’, but a place with hills, rolling roads and so. I fel in love with its comfort. It was exactly the kind of design for me: I can ride it like you ride an ‘urban bike’, perfectly sit with my spine perpendicular to the ground. With such a configuration, naturally, there is very little weight/force on the handlebars. I didn’t need to modify and/or adjust the bike for some awkward position. I am riding it the way it is supposed to be ridden.

I am 5’7″. Yes, I recognize, I could be lighter but it’s within the specs of the bike. I didn’t mention this before but just minutes after my first ‘wobble encounter’, I took the bike to a highly recognized bike shop. I live in a very particular place, on the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia, Canada. Mountain biking is VERY sophisticated here all year, and those guys work only with mountain bikes. The first thing they saw was my terrified face, the only one I could’ve to have after being so close to smashing 260 lbs at 30 miles/h against a boulder or a tree (no difference). Then they looked at my bike and both mechanics said: no wonders you didn’t get killed already with that *sh&%@y* fork. Well…, I became quite disappointed. Having paid a fortune for this bike I thought the components were equivalent -kind of- to having a Porsche class bike. True, just a Bosxter, but a Porsche nevertheless. Then I started to look at all the other components and, frankly, they are quite low-level. So what did I pay for? a battery? technology? Wobbling excitement?

Cheers,
Alberto

James Sagerser
1 day ago

Hi Court, Thanks for the excellent review as always. My wife and I are proud owners of a High-Step (58 cm) and a Wave (50 cm) as of 10 days ago. They are really fantastic bikes. I am 68 years old, 6’2″, and 203 lbs and the wife is 67, 5’6″ and 180 lbs (shhh). We’ve ridden them with lots of assist since we like to cover more trails and enjoy peddling but don’t want to effort up the numerous hills in the Denver area.

On flat ground with slight inclines here and there, we found level 2 and gear 6 makes it feel like we on a slight down grade all the time. Up the steepest hills, we use level 4 (now has “0” and 4 levels of assist) and 3rd or 4th gear so we don’t effort at all. Really, really fun!! I know it’s not healthy to fully drain even a Lithium-ion battery but I wanted to use mine until it quit to see what kind of mileage we would get given our moderate assist riding averaging 8-10 mph. At 47.5 miles, the final bar of battery charge started flashing and at 48.5 miles the assist quit. That was quite impressive considering about 10% of the driving was on a gravel/dirt canal trail.

We added a basket on the back of my bike so we could take our 15 lb mutt. He enjoys it as much as we do. Just a note; I rode my wife’s “Wave” model bike trying to induce the wobble mentioned above and could not replicate it. I personally don’t see an issue. It worked flawlessly. We’ve change the seats out for 2, more age appropriate, softer and wider seats plus have ordered 2 Thudbuster suspension seat posts (short travel). They will be here in a few days.

Here’s what we like best about our new bikes:

  1. They don’t look or sound like an E-bike so we go anywhere we want without issue so far.
  2. Very, very quite especially with the belt drive. In fact, we can’t hear any noise going 8-10 mph in assist level 2 and gear 6. More quite than a regular bike with a chain.
  3. Mid-motor drives mean greater range than a hub motor plus it has large battery capacity (647wh).
  4. The gears are leveraged with a mid-motor drive so we can climb amazingly steep hills in the lower gears without straining the motor. Very nice when we ride the trail from Dillon to Aspen uphill then coast back.
  5. Fast charging time with the 5 Amp charger that was standard equipment (instead of the usual 2 Amp).
  6. Better warranty than with other bikes we were considering.

Safe biking! Jim

Reply
Court Rye
1 day ago

Wow, what a fantastic overview James! You included all of the relevant details about body weight, model type and size, and even your age. This is incredibly helpful and useful. I grew up in Colorado and can just imagine you and your wife out there having a blast together in the beautiful mountains and sunshine. Thank you so much for this feedback and the list of things you appreciate about the Lacuba EVO E8, it means a lot to me and other readers I’m sure :)

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Alberto Orchansky
2 days ago

If the problem is not resolved after they did all the "tightening" of the ebike's integrity, then you have to get your money back! The problem is real and if they don't acknowledge it then go to the media, make a lot of noise. After that, fight it in court as a defective product. I don't know if lemon law also applies to ebikes. Make sure you video the actual shimmy from different angles so we can watch it at youtube.

This morning I had the bike checked -again- at a different bike shop. The third inspection and in this case, to get another independent opinion.
They were NOT able to find anything out of order, including checking the torque on everything 'torquable' and particularly in reference to Bull's last request, to have the front spokes checked.

I am NOT blaming anybody but myself. However, one of the main considerations for the selection was the fact that it was rated as the Number 1 by EBR in Best City Electric Bikes for 2016/2017 category And yes, I rode it, I compared it with other bikes and this one was by far the one that, for me, offered the best riding position given my physical limitations.

I posted the same letter that initiated this thread on EBR review. I got a response from the reviewer that, to make it short, I am not quoting here (you can see it in the review). However, I am quoting here a paragraph from my response to the reviewer:

..... I didn’t mention this before but just minutes after my first ‘wobble encounter’, I took the bike to a highly recognized bike shop. I live in a very particular place, on the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia, Canada. Mountain biking is VERY sophisticated here all year, and those guys work only with mountain bikes. The first thing they saw was my terrified face, the only one I could’ve to have after being so close to smashing 260 lbs at 30 miles/h against a boulder or a tree (no difference). Then they looked at my bike and both mechanics said: no wonders you didn’t get killed already with that *sh&%@y* fork. Well…, I became quite disappointed. Having paid a fortune for this bike I thought the components were equivalent -kind of- to having a Porsche class bike. True, just a Boxster, but a Porsche nevertheless. Then, I started to look at all the other components and, frankly, they are quite low-level. So what did I pay for? a battery? technology? Wobbling excitement?

I appreciate your comment and suggestions, and this is precisely the reason of why I initiated this thread in this forum and the title I gave to it: "RECALL and DISCONTINUE LACUBA EVO E8 WAVE"

I am packing the bike and shipping it back to the vendor. I'll keep you posted.

Cheers,

Alberto

Alberto Orchansky
4 days ago

Is the drive the sole element binding the seatpost tube to the downtube.? If so that might be the issue. Here in Switzerland a company called Flyer produces ´classic shaped frames' (i.e Dutch style bikes) for many of its models. In a TV interview, a rep. explained that this is the most difficult type of frame to produce because the structures need to be reinforced in order to resist increased loads. This comes from a company that has produced Dutch style frames for over 15 years. Now, looking at the design of your bike, it almost looks like the drive is a single porting element that bears the loads coming from the down tube and seat tube.

I just happen to have a Flyer bike with me, so I took a picture. Looking at the frame design below, you can see that it's structurally reinforced in 3 places: headtube, bottom bracket drive assembly, and under the seat post. It's a very stiff bike. There's nothing I can do to induce any torsion and I weigh 210 pounds. I've pushed it pretty hard going uphill.

I appreciate so much your contribution. Yes, the drive is the sole element binding the seatpost tube to the downtube, being 'reinforced' with the gusset pointed by @JRA in two of his comments. It is unfortunate there is no other Lacuba Wave owner joining this thread. His/her comment and ability to replicate the issue would be of extreme help for everybody.
In the meantime, I am in contact with Bulls through my vendor. I had the bike professionally inspected twice, (at a cost of CDN 300, not too bad considering it's CND 5,500 brand new bike). As reported previously, nothing but an adjustment for my weight on the fork's air pressure was required. Now I am requested to have the front spokes checked since Bulls believe that may also explain the issue.
I envy so much your Flyer bike...!
Thanks

DavidP
5 days ago

I bought an E-bike (2013 Izip E3 Metro) a few years ago, and don't ride it much . . primarily because I think I'm scared of the thing. It's power is a bit unpredictable to me (caused me to fall almost immediately after getting it), and just doesn't feel natural.

I now think that a mid-drive with a GOOD system will alleviate much of this. The Benno Eboost really caught my attention (probably won't actually use the ability to carry cargo, but I want the option, will probably buy all the racks and bags). And to be completely honest, I just love the "story" that goes with the Benno bikes. Or maybe I'm just attracted to "different" and what some people would call "ugly" bikes (I got the Metro in ORANGE, and would get the Benno in yellow).

I can't find a local dealer that has the Benno to drive, but I did drive an Easy Motion Atom Diamond (Brose drive with Shimano Nexus IGH) and some other bike that had the Bosch system with a 10-speed derailler (like the Benno). Both drives seemed fine to me, but the SMOOTHNESS of the Brose/Nexus system (primarily due to the IGH, I'm sure) really struck me. And the quietness.

Now, it's possible that the bike I rode with the Bosch simply didn't have the derailler properly adjusted that led to the lack of smoothness.

I really like the BIG tires on the Benno Eboost, pretty sure I'd like the 24" x 2.6" tires, and the whole bike. But it keeps bugging me that the Brose/Nexus just seemed soooo smooth.

It looks like perhaps a Bulls Lacuba EVO E8 would get me the Brose/Nexus drive system with larger tires (2" vs 1.5" of the Easy Motion, but still not the 2.6" of the Beeno or the 24" wheel diameter.

Any other bikes I should be looking at? Or should I just get the Benno and not worry about the derailler and the lack of smoothness I detected in the bike I test-drove? I guess I should go test-drive another bike or two somewhere with the Bosch system if I can find one.

Anybody got the Benno Boost and love it or hate it?

Alberto Orchansky
5 days ago

Unfortunately, @JRA, that hybrid frame design in the prior image is not an "add on" feature; it has to be done during the initial build of the bike. Other brands of really low step ebikes have had a similar wobble issue with hub motor setups and rear mounted batteries, particularly with bigger riders. It is most apparent at the initial acceleration and sometimes at deceleration to a stop. The added rigidity of some additional piece to the frame, an added strut (and it doesn't have to be much) will resolve the issue. Look at the first edition of Currie Tech's Izip Zuma low step ebikes; they had the same issue. Next season, they added a small extra reinforcement just above the crank arms which solved the shimmy issue.

As for a fix, the shop and buyer will have to work this out; Bulls may not have realized how much vibration would happen with this style of frame since their focus has really been more on other styles of frames. Hopefully all 3 can find a middle ground so @Alberto Orchansky, can find the bike that works for him. I would strongly suggest a lot of test riding prior to taking a bike home.

Thanks @JRA
I am attaching a photo and made a composite of it. On the left, and marked with a RED CIRCLE, is the photo sent from BULLS to my vendor/dealer explaining how the seat post is attached to the front of the bike. The explanation from BULLS to the photo is quote: As I mentioned on the phone this is the first claim we’ve heard of a Lacuba EVO E8 having any speed wobble. Our wave frame doesn’t have a top tube but is strengthened with a wide downtube and also a reinforcement tube that’s welded at the “dip” (pics attached) end of quote. The BULLS photo -on the left- is the one with the RED CIRCLE. On the right, is a photo of my bike, which I submitted back to my vendor, which is going to be sent to BULLS including my own comment: I composed a photo whereas the original you sent -with the red circle- is on the left. My bike is on the right shown with the measuring tape. If you count the number of welding 'spots', there is a difference of 3 welding spots between both bikes. Assuming each weld is of the same thickness, the height of the (almost) triangular piece welded between the vertical and horizontal bars must be different: higher on the triangular piece of the BULLS photo. Also, and this might be just an illusion due to the angle of the photo, I have the impression that the triangular piece marked on the red circle is higher and steeper than the one on my bike.
I'll keep you posted and many thanks for your interest.

1/1
Sonoboy
7 days ago

There are 3 versions of this ebike. You can try the low step version and see if you can lift your foot above the top tube. Some people, me included, lean the bike 45 degrees (or even lower) towards me before I step over the bike.
http://propelbikes.com/product/bulls-lacuba-evo-e8-2017/

Wave is an interesting name for a product that shimmies and wobble.
It makes one wonder if they increased the tube wall thickness on the Wave or simply "left off" the other frame elements. Doesn't inspire confidence in the design.

Mark Peralta
1 week ago

There are 3 versions of this ebike. You can try the low step version and see if you can lift your foot above the top tube. Some people, me included, lean the bike 45 degrees (or even lower) towards me before I step over the bike.
http://propelbikes.com/product/bulls-lacuba-evo-e8-2017/

Wave is an interesting name for a product that shimmies and wobble.

1/1
Rincon
1 week ago

I am posting this because this Lacuba model is being sold by BULLS without any warnings such: this bike should not, under any circumstances, be ridden by any person heavier than 200 lbs and taller than 5'8".

What is your height and weight?

McSpiffy
1 week ago

Pleasure is mine!
Many people have been very kind to me and have helped immensely. I am happy to help in anyway I can.
Trek FX+ is a pretty old model and the tech has moved on quite a bit. The latest bikes are in a league of its own.
I live close to the UIC campus. Let me know if you want to try out my ST2 or Trekking S Rx or both for a day or two and see if it suits your commute.
Whatever you choose, I am pretty certain that these new crop of ebikes will re-ignite your passion for biking.

Hi Ravi!

I've been communicating with Josh @ CrazyLenny's and I've narrowed my interest down to three: 2017 Haibike Urban Plus, 2017 Bulls Lacuba EVO45 and the Stromer ST2. The Urban Plus really looks like it would fit-the-bill, however; I'm a little concerned with the TransX M25 GTS drive unit with the recalls (forum posts do appear that repair/replacement was prompt and some posted that they can definitely feel a difference post-replacement) and the Cobi Smart-connected biking system . . . still working the bugs out or is it truly not ready for prime time? The Urban Plus is a 10+ aesthetically and really surpassed other manufacturers with their choice in components. The Lacuba EVO45 has the Brose drive unit but I'm concerned with how they chose to mount the battery (bottom vs. top-mounted) and where they chose to locate the key lock. On to the Stromer

. . . damn this impresses me but I'm gun-shy after reading several negative posts; can it really be that bad? I also don't want to spend another 1K on an already-pricey ride with stem/front shock upgrades to account for road vibration.

Is there a way to PM or IM you will a few more questions before I head out to CLB's?

Thanks for all your help!

Paul

Alberto Orchansky
1 week ago

Thanks Mark for your attention.
No, the wobble I experience is of such magnitude that unless you stop, or try to stop the bike, you'll be thrown out of it. It's not a 'vibration', it's a side to side wobble of the entire bike. The girl riding the bike in the video would've been so scared she would've come back walking, assuming she didn't fall breaking something. Moreover, note that particular bike has the battery mounted on the back and the motor located on the rear wheel, therefore most of the weight is on the back. Some wobble, on any low-step 'girls' bike, is expected due to the lack of the upper tube and a reduced frame torsion. However, I totally agree with you that what I am experiencing won't happen with a 'top tube' bike. The issue is that -due to my physical limitations- I am able to ride only step-through bikes. I cannot 'mount' a 'boys' bike.
I am posting this because this Lacuba model is being sold by BULLS without any warnings such: this bike should not, under any circumstances, be ridden by any person heavier than 200 lbs and taller than 5'8". Please note this warning has not been tested with people of any other weight/height combinations. Therefore, ride it at your own risk.
Thanks again Mark,
Alberto

Mark Peralta
1 week ago

I feel your pain. I wonder if the wobble you are describing is the same as in the video at 21:39.

If that's the case, then your ebike does not have enough torsional rigidity to handle the payload. The LACUBA EVO E8 WAVE only has the down tube attached to the seat tube, and has no top tube that enhances the strength and rigidity. I suggest you try to ride the high step version or the BULLS Lacuba EVO E45 which has similar frame but with the top tube, and then see if you can still duplicate the problem. Either way, I think you should exchange your ebike since it is not safe for you.

Here is educational video on speed wobble.

Alberto Orchansky
1 week ago

This is a copy of the email sent to Citrus Cycle and to BULLS on August 14, 2017

I bought an LACUBA EVO E8 WAVE from Citrus Cycle, Kelly Demoline, Ladysmith, BC, Canada on May 31, 2017. The choice of this model was due to my physical conditions. A few years ago I had an accident suffering serious injuries in my neck. As a consequence, my neck is fused, limiting my head movement. I have been an active bicycle rider, both mountain, and road- all my life, but since the accident, I was not able to get back to riding anyone.

Meeting Kelly Dmoline from Citrus Cycles changed all this once he introduced me the EVO E8 Wave.
It's riding position was just perfect for me, absolutely comfortable and the pedal-assisted feature made possible for me to get back safely to the road.

Unfortunately, and just within a couple of days, I had a terrifying and literally life threatening experience. While 'testing' the bike downhill on a paved road, reaching about 40 k/h (not pedaling) the bike started to wobble violently. Only thanks to the experience I have riding bicycles I was able to stop it safely.

The experience was so shocking that I immediately contacted Kelly Demoline, having decided to return the bike. He was very surprised about the issue but, without hesitation, was ready to take the bike back.

Overnight I thought about it, about how much the bike was going to give me back to my life, that I decided to keep it with the condition I set to myself to never get to 40 km/h again.

However, the problem subsisted at different speeds, 30, 25, 20 km/k and so. I kept trying to figure out what may be out of line to induce such a behavior. I have the bike checked in a bike shop without finding anything abnormal. All they did was to adjust the suspension fork pressure for my weight, 200 lbs.

Finally, today August 15, 2017, with the odometer at 179 km I was able to induce and reproduce the problem myself AT ANY SPEED.

Riding the bike on a paved road with enough grade to force the bike to increase its speed, WITHOUT PEDALING, once reaching about 15 km/h start jiggling the handlebar left-right right left quite fast. The movement will induce a wobble on the front end that will rapidly be transferred, amplified to the back, reaching its maximum where most of the weight is concentrated. I tend to think the weight and location of the battery are crucial components in this wave resonance / dynamic amplification problem.

The meaning of this is that just a pebble, pothole or any irregularity on the road may lead to a 'handlebar jiggle', inducing the wobbling effect AT ANY SPEED.

That's exactly why it happens to me so many times and at different speeds.

I understand the problem is magnified due to the typical riding position of an urban type bike, where there is limited rider's weight on the handlebars.

Another situation associated with the weight on the handlebars is when making a traffic signal: a single hand on the handlebar and very little control upon the jiggling/wobbling effect with the other hand.

To summarize, I do not believe there is nothing technically wrong or defective with my particular bicycle.

However, I strongly believe there is a conceptual flaw in the design of this particular model, making it unsafe to ride it to the point that it should be discontinued and a recall issued.

Sincerely,

Ravi Kempaiah
1 week ago

Wow!!!! Thank you for the prompt reply and all the information! I was really impressed by Court's video of the Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 and thought it would be the one . . . for some reason, I keep coming back to the Stromer ST2. I don't foresee myself doing century rides with it but it would be nice for commuting (@5am) as well as running errands/shopping. The Haibikes (Trekking S Rx and the SDURO Trekking 5) look like great options. The Bulls LACUBA EVO E45 intrigues me even more than the Dail-E Grinder; as for lighting, I have the DesignShine DS-500 tail light and DS-1300 headlight ( http://store.designshinelighting.com ) - phenomenal lighting!

I really appreciate your genuine passion for e-bikes and sharing your knowledge with others to be a better consumer. I'd like to bend your ear some more but I'd be happy to repay you with your favorite beverage (coffee/beer - whatever your drink of choice is!) or meal. I'd like to make the pilgrimage to Madison to visit Crazy Lenny's and compare some of these before a final purchase.

I'm hesitant to try another Trek e-bike since my Trek FX+ was a disappointment. It did get me back into bicycling after a +15 yr hiatus, putting in 3500mi/yr commuting and casual biking. I have lost interest the past few years and hope that this next step will re-ignite the passion. I still plan to ride my Domane 5.9 and I also have a Madone 4.7 that spends most of it's life attached to a Wahoo Kickr Snap or on my Kreitler rollers.

Thanks again for all you do! I look forward to hearing more from you . . .

Pleasure is mine!
Many people have been very kind to me and have helped immensely. I am happy to help in anyway I can.
Trek FX+ is a pretty old model and the tech has moved on quite a bit. The latest bikes are in a league of its own.
I live close to the UIC campus. Let me know if you want to try out my ST2 or Trekking S Rx or both for a day or two and see if it suits your commute.
Whatever you choose, I am pretty certain that these new crop of ebikes will re-ignite your passion for biking.

McSpiffy
1 week ago

Funny you ask that.
I live in Chicago myself and given the terrible road conditions here, I switched from Stromer ST2 to Haibike Trekking S Rx. While I absolutely enjoy the smoothness and quiet power delivery of ST2, hitting bumps and pot holes every 10m was not a nice feeling. I still use that for long distance travel.
I got my Trekking from Lenny's in Madison. Lenny has been like a father figure in my life and he even sponsored by Guinness Record ride last summer. So, mentioning him might be a conflict of interest here. But, I am happy to give you my honest answer.

Among your list, Trek Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice. You could run those Super Moto X at low PSI and with the Body Float, you would have no problem on the Chicago roads.
Looks like you are a pretty seasoned cyclist (not everyone rides a Trek Domane 5.9 wth Di2). You should also consider the BULLS Dail-E Grinder. It does come with Di2, Bosch speed motor and the Supernova M99 lighting that you see on the Trek Super commuter. The geometry is more relaxed compared to the Trek but it's so much lighter than the ST2 and the trekking S Rx. At 48lbs, it really handles very well. 2" Marathon Supereme + RockShox paragon does a great job of mitigating bumps.
http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/dail-e-grinder/

The rack on the Dail-E grinder is rated for 60lbs. So, I don't see any problem carrying stuff like groceries or laptop/lunch.

I recently did a weekend ride to Milwaukee and back on my Haibike Trekking S Rx: https://www.strava.com/activities/1118854733. While I was able to do the trip on 2 batteries, I also came to realize that upright riding positions just doesn't cut it for long rides like that. I am looking to switch back to the Dail-E grinder myself and retire the Trekking S Rx. It has been a great bike. I rode it throughout the winter and it has performed flawlessly. If you have the opportunity to pick up a Trekking S Rx, I would recommend it because it's an older year model and most shops offer some sale on those. You could also switch out the batteries to the newer 500Whr ones.

I am hesitant to recommend the Vado 6.0. I rode that bike at the Chicago Bike Expo and it rode great. In theory, that would be a terrific bike for the Chicago roads but there are some glitches with the Specialized firmware, their mission control app but if you have a dealer near you who is willing to back you up, it is worth a shot.
If you already have a pretty good relationship with your Trek dealer, then Super Commuter 8+ would be a great choice as well. My thinking may be different from yours. I am not going to own any system that has super proprietary battery geometry and related hardware. If I get another Bosch powered bike (whether it is Tern GSD or Yuba Spicy cargo bike or even Mountain bike), I could switch out batteries and chargers. Also, if two or more family members have similar kind of bikes, then you gain additional battery for occasional rides and stuff like that. With Bosch, you have more flexibility. There are more spares and accessories available for Bosch than the Specialized. I am not trying to downplay specialized here but their mountain bike battery is different from road bike and both of these are very different from their Turbo bikes. Now, I could use Trekking S Rx batteries on Yuba Cargo or any eMTB and eliminate redundancy.

Wow!!!! Thank you for the prompt reply and all the information! I was really impressed by Court's video of the Specialized Turbo Vado 6.0 and thought it would be the one . . . for some reason, I keep coming back to the Stromer ST2. I don't foresee myself doing century rides with it but it would be nice for commuting (@5am) as well as running errands/shopping. The Haibikes (Trekking S Rx and the SDURO Trekking 5) look like great options. The Bulls LACUBA EVO E45 intrigues me even more than the Dail-E Grinder; as for lighting, I have the DesignShine DS-500 tail light and DS-1300 headlight ( http://store.designshinelighting.com ) - phenomenal lighting!

I really appreciate your genuine passion for e-bikes and sharing your knowledge with others to be a better consumer. I'd like to bend your ear some more but I'd be happy to repay you with your favorite beverage (coffee/beer - whatever your drink of choice is!) or meal. I'd like to make the pilgrimage to Madison to visit Crazy Lenny's and compare some of these before a final purchase.

I'm hesitant to try another Trek e-bike since my Trek FX+ was a disappointment. It did get me back into bicycling after a +15 yr hiatus, putting in 3500mi/yr commuting and casual biking. I have lost interest the past few years and hope that this next step will re-ignite the passion. I still plan to ride my Domane 5.9 and I also have a Madone 4.7 that spends most of it's life attached to a Wahoo Kickr Snap or on my Kreitler rollers.

Thanks again for all you do! I look forward to hearing more from you . . .

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

Bulls EVO E8 is materially superior to Pedego in every way.
Good torque sensor, huge battery, hydraulic brakes, good aesthetics, Gates drive, battery in the downtube = better handling.
Pedego is much more powerful than the BULLS and frankly, most ladies love the Pedego. The color and the relaxed styling is what charms them.

B/w ST2 and Lacuba E45, you just need to test ride and see what works for you. ST2 is really an excellent bike if you are not dealing with lots of hills or stop-go traffic.
If you are ok with shifting, then any mid-drive BULLS with Brose or Bosch would work well.

The best thing would be to rest them and see which one you like the best.

scrambler
3 weeks ago

Hi, new here, but long time lurker :)

I am looking into an E-bike for my wife that would ideally have the following characteristics

Integrated Torque / speed / cadence sensor for best of breed PAS
IGH, Ideally a NuVinci CVT, ideally with Harmony
Gates carbon drive belt system
Mid drive with as much power as possible for the steep hills of the SF Bay Area... The Bosch 350W would be a minimum, the new Bafang Max looks interesting with more torque, and the Bafang Max Ultra sounds exciting with 1000W...
Front suspension, plus suspension seat post for light trail riding.

I have a few on my radar (see below), none of which of course fit the complete bill, so I am looking at what it would take to customize one of the almost perfect ones to fit the bill.
One of these customization, would be to replace the rear derailleur and cassette by a NuVinci.

Hence my Question / post title.
Does anyone know of a bike shop in the San Francisco Bay Area that can source and install the NuVinci system on an electric bike?

Thank you for any insights.

PS: For those sharing the same specs interest, here is my current shortlist.
EVELO new Galaxy model (closest to spec at lowest price): Would need to add a suspension fork and seat posts.
FLX Blade (more exciting motor): Would need to Add the new NuVinci 380x, and a Belt drive system
RIESE &MUELLER Nevo (expensive, no throttle ): Would need to add the harmony controller
Other expensive contenders:
FELT versa E10; Cube SUV Hybrid pro 500; BULL Lacuba Evo E8 Wave

Jim Dove
3 weeks ago

First, thanks for the feedback on the husband and wife thread I started. More research has me comparing these two bikes for my wife. I thought a new thread would elicit more response, so apologies for the noise.

Is The Bulls materially superior to the Pedego. The latter has the advantage of my wife loving the color choices and the local dealer.

For me, I am deciding between a Stromer ST2 versus a Bulls Lacuba EVO45 and leaning toward the Bulls. Any advice there welcome too. Again -- spectacular forum and information on the site. This has been very helpful.

Many thanks,
Jim

5ebikes
4 weeks ago

I have really been enjoying my Lacuba e45, but it has developed a terrible creaking noise at around 350 miles. I wish someone would post a teardown video of the Bulls/Brose system. It seems crazy to drive a CAR a couple hours to a dealer to tighten a couple bolts (I think it is the motor mount bolts). Anyone have a dealer manual for this bike? I haven't had any luck finding a video on youtube either.

I think these are the required tools:
Isis bottom bracket tool
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0052TC9NA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Isis crank puller
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001N883JS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Also curious if this item is required and how it is used?
http://www.pro-cycling-golla.de/Werkzeug/Abziehhuelse_zur_Demontage_des_Spiders_artikel575d2e41991c7.html

When you are putting on 200 miles a week, it is not feasible to go to a dealer for every minor adjustment. Bulls needs to be more friendly to commuters, especially when they are selling commuter model bikes.

art newcomer
4 weeks ago

Bunny. I bought my wife the Bulls Lacuba EVO 8 with the wave frame. It is awesome! I wouldn't suggest a full suspension eBike as there are some tricky engineering challenges that cost money to overcome.
You should at least get a bike with front fork shocks, and you can buy seat posts that have a suspension in them.
There are a few "wave" frames out there for a 5'2" person.

art newcomer
4 weeks ago

I'm looking for a bike that is good in the city, mid-drive that can do 28MPH and also handle some light off road or trail riding, mainly dirt roads. Does anyone have suggestions for such a bike?

I bought the Lacuba EVO 8, it's governed at 20MPH. The EVO 45 is the 28 mph versio. The tires are the same, they have some sort of Kevlar lining. I use my bike on dirt 75% of the time. It does well.
Loose sand with an my eBike has been my only source of concern.

art newcomer
4 weeks ago

Hi all,
I am a 42 year old 6'0" chubby guy pushing 280 lbs and I need to get back on the bike to commute for health and sanity sake. I ride 16-22 miles round trip to work over some hilly roads. Right now on my commuter bike I take about an hour to do the trip when I am feeling good. I want an e-bike to speed things up a bit for the commute. I have narrowed down my choices between the Izip E3 Dash or the Bulls Lacuba Evo for a commuter e-bike and need some input. Price wise the Izip is a little easier to digest where as the Bulls looks like a better motor and battery. So looking for suggestions and input?

Josh, I bought the Lacuba EVO 8 with the gates belt drive. Love it. I am just slightly thinner than you. My bike climbs the hills just fine with me onboard.
I highly recommend it!

5ebikes
2 months ago

I'm new to this. I'm 6' 4" and weigh 245 Lbs. Do I need an "S" bike? I'm looking at the upcoming Vado 3.0 or 5.0. Would the 3.0 work for me with my planned rides (up to 25 miles RT and relatively flat or should I up for a 5.0 just due to my bulk/weight?). I just don't want to buy something that will have the battery quit on me due to my weight. Thanks!

you will not be happy with a 20mph governer. Either, get a tuning dongle to increase the speed or get a 28mph bike. I like and own the Lacuba e45. My Levo has the 20mph governer and it is just fine for a mountain bike, but not acceptable for a street bike.

5ebikes
2 months ago

checkout the Bulls Lacuba evo e45. It's got plenty of hill climbing power and the same motor as the Vado. I live on a steep hill and can maintain 15mph.
You also get real brakes on the Bulls, rather than the 180/160's on the Vado. The e45 comes with 8" rotors. Last, the battery is bigger on the e45.

5ebikes
2 months ago

Looking for a commuter for a 20 mile round trip commute in hilly terrain. My wife has a Stromer ST1 Elite that I like but with so much weight in the back it isn't the most balanced bike I've ever ridden. I haven't test ridden the Specialized as there isn't one local yet but the reviews intrigued me. Anyone know if the Stromer ST1 Elite battery is compatible with the ST1x? Any input, advice, or other suggestions appreciated.
Thanks!

Neither, get the Bulls Lacuba evo e45. It has better specs than the Stromer and Vado. I prefer the e45 over the Giant and the Integrale 11 too.
Call Brent at Great Western Ebikes, if you go in the store, he will work you a deal. btw, I own a Levo and an e45, so I have a dog in both fights. The e45 rides like a dream.

Linda Baer
2 months ago

We've been loving the Wave frame models from Bulls. Check out the Bulls Cross Lite E and the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8. Super easy to mount and dismount and very much in the upright position. Go for the Lacuba if you're looking for the longest battery life. Brose batteries go forever.
I did super like the lacuba, but it's a bit pricey. I'm planning to get the Kalkhoff Agutta B7 in a couple weeks. I think I have done my research and decided it has all the bells and whistles at an affordable price...and it fits me. Thanks so much everyone for your feedback!

VideoNOLA
3 months ago

I'd love to know what the expected wear life is for those drive belts.

Green Savant
2 weeks ago

Go to the Gates site. They, and others, have quoted 2x+. Also, what is your time worth? Myself, I'd rather be riding than cleaning, lubing and adjusting a chain.

Veranda Tales
4 months ago

pros I like the no fuss belt drive and the overall clean design.
cons high price and lack of no flat tire

Lysle Basinger
4 months ago

I have an arm that fastens from the seat post to the front stem that allows for mounting on a bike rack. These were designed years ago for ladies bike frames.

Michael M
5 months ago

Thanks for all your reviews. Only two ebike stores in my city. Once tells Trek, the other sells proprietary brand called electrobike. Non sell Bulls, Haibike or many of the bikes you reviewed. You have reviewed Trek though. Your reviews of different models lets me view other brands before forking out $$$$. The only downside of ordering online is I cannot test ride these bikes before buying.

Green Savant
2 weeks ago

I have bought 6 ebikes from Crazy Lenny's with no problems, great support, and the absolute best price. As for Trek, they private label their ebike systems, and my experience with a Bionx bike from them was NO REPLY. (No way, never again!)

mattyj342111
6 months ago

please review the elite gt

Noukz37
6 months ago

Easy Motion Evo City for me and this baby for my lady, and who needs to buy a car, or have a garage even? When car is needed, renting and car-sharing will work perfectly. Buying a car is such a waste of money and resources.
P.S. Love your reviews Curt, you're becoming like an E-Bike God or sth :-D

TheEdge008
6 months ago

As usual, great review! Just curious, Court: Have you ever changed out a rear tire of a bike that has the Gates system? Is it easy?

mastachinn
6 months ago

I have Gates belt drive on two of my bikes and changing the rear tire is relatively easy.  It is just like a chain drive except your hands do not get greasy.  There is belt tension requirement but I find it is fairly lax.  The Bulls Lacuba appears to have two fasteners on each side of the rear drops for easy adjustment of the belt tension.

Luis Rodriguez
6 months ago

Hi, I have watched many of your reviews. I have a fat bike with a 2 stroke motor that I installed. But was disappointed by how lack of power has going up the hills. Too much pedaling going up the hill for a 69 year old guy. even considering that I practice the Triathlons export for many years. But I love bikes, so I am trying to decide on a electric fat bike that is powerfull enough to handle the mountains road of Puerto Rico. Any recommendations.? I will like to be under $2k price range. Thanks for any help you can provide.

David Macdonald
7 months ago

That's a proper sized battery I think they should all come with a standard 20 amp battery to properly make these bikes really take over from your car .

slappy76
7 months ago

I don't see any specs listed on the Bulls website regarding weight. Would a rider close to 280lbs be a suitable fit on a wave frame? How about the midstep?

عاشق موسيق
8 months ago

🙆🙋🙌👉😊

Nicky458itl
8 months ago

why that screen so much huge? smartphone size but like a baby-g watch information.

Nisco Racing
9 months ago

$4K Yeah some people will come up whit, i can buy a decent car for that price.

ElectricBikeReview.com
8 months ago

The challenge with a car is the cost of licensing, insurance and gas... it's a much more expensive purchase over the course of time

Joe Blogs
9 months ago

im really loving the design of the bulls bikes

ElectricBikeReview.com
8 months ago

Me too, this one especially looks very good... clean

250 watts
9 months ago

https://www.e-bikeshop.co.uk/downloads/yamaha/Yamaha-PW-X-eBike-System-2017.pdf

ElectricBikeReview.com
8 months ago

Yamaha has a really nice battery design, I like the side-slide concept

Duncan Carr
9 months ago

I've been using a Haibike 26 XDuro RC to cycle to work & back for 7 months solid. The journey is 20 miles a day (10 each way - obviously!). My battery - it was almost new - only just manges to manage the 20 miles - at full assistance. Also, if I turn the power off, it is like cycling in treacle, in no way similar to a regular bike. I guess the motor causes a large hindrance when lacking any power. I flipping love it though. 22 mph everywhere. Nice.

Terry Brightwater
9 months ago

Nice bike ;0) Great review :0)

Terry Brightwater
9 months ago

Yes totally agree, love the tech and design ;0) I am really enjoying the evolution of e bike design and tech :0) I am amazed how much it has changed in the last 3 to 4 years! Really appreciate your regular reviews and constant enthusiasm ;0)
 

ElectricBikeReview.com
9 months ago

Thanks Terry, I really appreciate your support and I'm sure Bulls does as well. I thought this was an amazing combination of tech like the geared hub, belt drive and beautiful mid-drive and hidden battery :)

Sita van Waarde
9 months ago

I Am realy impressed of how you revieus bikes 👍🏼👍🏼

Sita van Waarde
9 months ago

I had a car Its. Nice to have but i ride not verry far from home most of THE times
A electric bike is a Nice replacement for a car
I tink a lot about E bikes for a fuw Years
Its a lot of money so iT needs to be near purfect for what i whis

ElectricBikeReview.com
9 months ago

Thanks, I do my best! Do you have an electric bike or are you exploring trying to find the perfect one :)

Yulian Baskoro
9 months ago

6:16 XDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

ElectricBikeReview.com
8 months ago

Great feedback, thanks for chiming in Lenny!

Robert Wetzel
8 months ago

+Crazy Lenny's Ebikes Thank you! So I will consider it :)

Crazy Lenny's Ebikes
8 months ago

We had a rider do several century rides on one of the BULLS bike equipped with Brose motor. No sign of overheating. The motor gets warm ( 40'c) or so but no thermal cut off.

Robert Wetzel
9 months ago

Oh the maturity of your audience. Great review, and you're right, this is pretty close to a decent car replacement.
One question, though: I've heard in two other (german language) reviews on youtube and read in a magazine that the Brose motor has a tendency to overheat due to some ventilation issues, esepcially after prolonged use under stress (long uphills).
Can you confirm or deny this?

ElectricBikeReview.com
9 months ago

Ah yes... big nutz

pipeman451
9 months ago

Great review as always and one beautiful machine. Now remove the speed limit and get it down to say 3500 and send me one. I'm assuming most are built off shore where manufacturing cost is incredibly cheap since they're all built in a small handful of facilities to brand specs. When the price is right I'll pony up. Until then when spring comes around it's a radrover for me. Although it certainly has penash doesn't it. Keep up the great job and I'll be sending my thumbs up along the way.

jeremy scarsone
5 months ago

Ive had the rad rover for four months and love it but after watching these reviews I just ponied up for the bulls e45 to ride in the spring/summer. Should be here in a few days. Some people are not able to drive for certain reasons or just don't want to pay for the gas and insurance. Keep all these wonderful reviews coming court.

ElectricBikeReview.com
9 months ago

Thanks! I've got another Bulls speed pedelec review in the works, very cool platform I'm sure you'll enjoy checking out. But yeah, also still a bit expensive ;)