BULLS Lacuba EVO E8 Review

Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Electric Bike Review
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Gates Carbon Cdx Belt 50t Sprocket
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Rear Kickstand
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Bulls Ci Backlit Display Remote Button Pad
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ergon Gp1 Locking Grips Ergonomic
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sr Suntour Ecx E Air Fork Fuxon Headlight
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 I Rack Fuxon Led Back Light
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sks Rookie Mini Pump
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Wave Frame Deep Step Thru
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Large Removable Bmz Battery
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike High Step
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike Step Thru
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Electric Bike Review
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Gates Carbon Cdx Belt 50t Sprocket
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Shimano Hydraulic Disc Rear Kickstand
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Bulls Ci Backlit Display Remote Button Pad
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ergon Gp1 Locking Grips Ergonomic
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sr Suntour Ecx E Air Fork Fuxon Headlight
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 I Rack Fuxon Led Back Light
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Sks Rookie Mini Pump
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Wave Frame Deep Step Thru
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Large Removable Bmz Battery
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike High Step
Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 Ebike Step Thru

Summary

  • A versatile urban electric bike well suited to commuting, touring and trekking because of its efficient mid-drive motor and larger than average battery capacity, durable internal gearing and belt drive
  • Available in five frame sizes and three frame styles including wave, mid-step and high-step diamond for improved fit and optimized mounting and control or stiffness and performance
  • Completely outfitted with high-end accessories and hardware including fenders, rack with mini pump, hydraulic disc brakes, Kevlar-lined tires, a lightweight air suspension fork and integrated lights
  • Solid warranty and growing dealer base in the US with European backing, room for improvement with battery lock design and charging port cover, no quick release on rear wheel

Search EBR

Video Review

Trusted Advertisers

Introduction

Make:

BULLS

Model:

Lacuba EVO E8

Price:

$3,999

Body Position:

Upright, Upright Relaxed

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Urban, Commuting, Touring

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Motor and Battery, 5 Years Frame

Availability:

Europe, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand

Model Year:

2017

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

56 lbs (25.4 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

6.61 lbs (2.99 kg)

Frame Material:

7005 Aluminium

Frame Sizes:

17.72 in (45 cm)18.89 in (47.98 cm)19.68 in (49.98 cm)20.86 in (52.98 cm)22.83 in (57.98 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

18" Stand Over Height for Wave Model

Frame Types:

High-Step, Mid-Step, Step-Thru

Frame Colors:

Satin Silver with Gloss Black and Copper Highlights

Frame Fork Details:

SR Suntour SF17-NCX-E Air, 63 mm Travel, Lockout Adjust, 11 mm QR Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

11 mm Skewer with Bolts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

8 Speed 1x8 Shimano Nexus Inter8 Internally Geared Hub, 26T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Nexus Grip Shift on Right

Cranks:

SR Suntour, 50T

Pedals:

Wellgo C-098DU Plastic Platform with Rubber Tread

Headset:

FSA Tapered 1-1/8"

Stem:

Satori Adjustable Angle

Handlebar:

Swept Back, 600 mm or 620 mm Length, 5° Bend

Brake Details:

Shimano M395 Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Front Rotor and 160 mm Rear Rotor, Shimano Levers with Adjustable Reach

Grips:

Ergon GP1 Locking, Ergonomic

Saddle:

Selle Royal Scientia M3

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

300 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

RYDE Double Wall, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge Front 13 Gauge Rear, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Big Apple, 28" x 2"

Wheel Sizes:

28 in (71.12cm)

Tire Details:

Active Line K-Guard, Reflective Sidewall Tape, 35-70 PSI

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Velo Battery Protector Pad, Fuxon Integrated LED Lights, SKS Plastic Fenders, i-RACK with Pannier Blockers and Spring Latch with 25 kg Max Load, SKS Rookie Mini Pump, Plastic Chain Cover, Adjustable Length Kickstand

Other:

IP56 Ingress Rating, 2.5 lb 5 Amp Energy Bus Charger from BMZ, Gates Carbon Drive CDX Belt

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Brose E25

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

530 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

BMZ

Battery Voltage:

37 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

17.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

647.5 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

130 miles (209 km)

Display Type:

BULLS CI, Removable Backlit LCD Display

Readouts:

Battery Level (5 Bars), Speed, Assist Level (None, Eco, Tour, Sport), Total Distance, Trip Distance, Trip Time, Trip Calories, Max Speed, Avg. Speed, Total Time, Time of Day, Average Motor Power, Average Rider Performance

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, Lights Button, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Cadence and Torque Sensing)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

Trusted Advertisers



Written Review

The Lacuba Evo E8 is like an “everything electric bike” because it comes in five sizes, three different frame styles, has fenders, a rack, suspension fork, integrated lights, a large battery and an efficient mid-drive motor. I guess it’s not well suited to trails and mountain biking… but the motor used here, from Brose, is the same one that Bulls uses on their very capable full suspension mountain models! With 90 Newton meters of torque and a 250 watt nominal output, the bike is no slouch. What really sets it apart from some competing models is the internally geared hub running on a Carbon reinforced belt drive. You don’t have to worry as much about a derailleur getting bumped or a chain falling off. There’s no grease and oil to deal with and you can shift gears anytime (even at standstill). One trade-off with this setup is that the rear wheel uses bolts instead of a quick release skewer but the tires are higher quality Kevlar-lined models that shouldn’t be as susceptible to punctures from thorns or glass. Also, the front wheel does have quick release so maybe half the time it will still be easier to change the flat. Also worth noting is the compact mini-pump that clips into the rear cargo rack. Low tire pressure is a leading cause of pinch flats and can contribute to lower efficiency so having that pump with you at all times should further reduce instances of flat tires… just make sure you don’t leave it on the frame to get stolen at the bike rack :/

In my opinion, Bulls has done an excellent job outfitting the Lacuba EVO E8 with name brand hardware that will last longer and reduce weight while still hitting an impressive value price point. No, it’s not super cheap at just over $4k but the reflective sidewall stripes on the upgraded tires could save your life along with the integrated LED lights front and rear. The Selle Royal saddle significantly improves comfort when combined with the air suspension fork and adjustable angle stem… not to mention ergonomic grips (again name brand) from Ergon. You can spend a lot of money swapping saddles and changing touch points and end up with a bike that doesn’t look as good as this. The fenders are tight and have sturdy struts and attachment points on the rear rack so they don’t rattle. You get a chainguard that keeps your pants from rubbing on the belt, but even if this wasn’t here you’d stay a lot cleaner than if it was running a chain. Designing frames that have a cut-away for actually using a belt (since the belt can’t be unlinked like chains can) is expensive and I’m just amazed that they did it for five frame sizes and all of the different frame types. I especially like the step-thru and low-step wave because it’s a lot easier to mount the bike than swinging your leg up and over the rear rack (especially if you’ve got a trunk bag mounted there). This is an electric bike that should fit most riders and be more fun and secure for shorter petite riders like women. My girlfriend has hit her leg and crotch many a time riding other bicycles and it creates insecurity and she doesn’t want to ride as much. Yes, the wave model that I test rode and photographed for this review isn’t going to be as stiff as the mid-step or high-step diamond or as easy to mount on some car racks but at least she will want to go riding and this isn’t a bike that needs to be so stiff.

I love the battery and motor integration, both are tight so you don’t hear rattling and they blend right in with the frame. It only comes in one color scheme but it’s professional and helps the black battery and motor casing blend in… along with the black cables (many of which are routed through the frame to reduce snags). Even though this has a downtube battery, because it mounts up from the bottom, there are screws for mounting a bottle cage on all of the different frame styles. This is great because we all need hydration! Surprisingly, many electric bikes forego bottle cage bosses and while you can compromise with a bag or seat mount they just aren’t as easy to reach and sometimes don’t feel as secure to me. Another usability feature that this Bulls model offers that some of their others do not is the larger CI backlit display panel. Being larger, it’s much easier to read from afar and I absolutely LOVE that it’s removable. This will reduce instances of scratching and wear from sun and other weather when parked at the rack. The display even has a little Micro USB port at the bottom for charging your phone or other electronic devices. I sometimes use my phone for GPS directions so that’s really cool.

In terms of performance, the Brose motor is quiet, responsive and very efficient if you simply switch gears naturally as you ride (lower gears for climbing, higher gears for going fast). Inside the motor are gears to transform high RPM into powerful torque and you can hear some whirring as it spins but this is still one of the quieter motors out there to choose from (comparing to Bosch, Yamaha or Impulse). It doesn’t offer shift-sensing but that’s not as important since it uses a combination torque and cadence sensor and the drivetrain here is a geared hub vs. traditional derailleur with cassette. I like that both the motor and battery are low and center on all models of the Lacuba EVO E8 because some similar designs from competing brands opt for the rear rack battery which reduces your carrying capacity there and stands out more in my opinion while also shifting balance and raising the center of gravity. Accomplishing the preferred design here costs more but again, the price for this bike isn’t outlandish. Some minor improvements I would like to see however are the rubber flap that covers the charging port… It doesn’t stick down as easily as I’d like and could let water and dust in. The bike doesn’t automatically lock the battery in when you mount it and it would be a bummer if someone stole this because they are very expensive to replace. The key for locking the battery in is right there at the bottom bracket where the crank arms pass by and could easily get broken if you forget to remove it. I also feel like the Shimano Inter8 geared hub can be a bit wonky and take some getting used to, it doesn’t always shift immediately if you’re pushing down and this can cause confusion and over-shifting.

All things considered, this is a fantastic electric bike platform that’s at home as a very fancy comfortable neighborhood rider, a tuff urban commuter or even a touring or trekking ebike. There are solid electric bikes that offer similar performance for basic riding that cost half as much but this one will surely last longer and perform at a much higher level than those. Bulls offers an excellent two year comprehensive warranty along with five year frame coverage. They’re opening up more dealers in the US but have a solid global reputation from years of operation in Europe and Asia. From 2016 to 2017 they’ve introduced many more models and I can tell they are committed to delivering an excellent experience. That’s part of what you’re paying for here and why I’d strongly consider this model for my own commute in town. Just grab a nice pannier backpack or duffle style trunk bag and you’re set for 40+ miles of riding each day and impressively fast charging thanks to the 5 amp charger (most are just 2 or 4). It’s an electric bike that’s easy to get excited about and one that fits into the most widely accepted Class 1 category with 20 mph top speed in the US. Big thanks to Bulls for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • The bike is extremely well equipped, the design is polished and it comes in three frame styles (stiff high-step, easier to mount mid-step and approachable wave deep step-thru) and five frame sizes!
  • In addition to a range of frame styles and sizes that improve fit, there’s also an adjustable angle stem and relaxed curved bar with name-brand ergonomic grips on this bike
  • At over $4k this isn’t what most people would call affordable but considering the internally geared hub, brand name belt drive, integrated lights, reflective tires and high quality rack with a mini-pump I think it’s a good value for what it is
  • Most of the super commuters and touring electric bikes I test out that have fenders, racks etc. all weigh a bit more but at ~56 lbs this one isn’t bad and part of that is the air suspension fork… internally geared hubs also weigh more but are durable so it’s a good trade-off here, the battery is easily removable for reduced weight when transporting
  • Belt drives tend to stay cleaner than chains because they don’t require lubrication, they also run quiet and don’t drop (in part because this is the upgraded Gates CDX with center-tracking design)
  • In addition to the cleaner belt drive, you get tightly integrated plastic fenders and a nice chain guard to keep your shoes and pants clean even in wet conditions
  • I love the rack on this thing, it has pannier mounting tubes along the sides, a spring latch on top, an integrated mini-pump and it connects to the fender for added support and reduced rattling
  • It’s great that they designed the downtube in such a way that you can still mount a bottle cage for easy-to-reach hydration while riding, consider a trunk bag like this for carrying extra bottles
  • I was really impressed with the battery capacity offered on this and other Bulls electric bikes, you really could use this for long commutes or touring, the efficient mid-drive motor is a battery sipper compared to hub motors
  • It’s nice having a display panel to show your speed, assist level and power output but I’m super happy with the one they chose because it’s removable… that means less wear and damage at racks outside if you commute (just don’t misplace it), I also like that it has a Micro USB charging port in the bottom for charging your phone or other portable electronics!
  • Solid hydraulic disc brakes provide smooth powerful stopping power and the levers offer adjustable reach so you can use them easily even if your hands or fingers are smaller and shorter
  • The bike is already really comfortable but you could swap out the rigid seat post with a 30.9 mm suspension like this, just keep in mind it will raise the minimum seat height, I like the Selle Royal saddle that comes stock (it’s a bit larger and less firm than others)
  • I like that the tires have a kevlar puncture-resistant lining because it’s not much fun fixing flats and only the front wheel has quick release here (because the rear uses an internally geared hub, you’ll need tools to remove the bolts)
  • The charger outputs 5 amps so it fills the pack quicker than some others (which are just 2 or 4 amp) and I like that they went with the fancier magnetic EnergyBus port because it just pops out if you trip over it vs. tipping the bike or bending the pins

Cons:

  • Activating the bike requires two steps if you haven’t ridden for a while, press the power button on the downtube then up at the button pad, could be confusing at first if you haven’t charged the battery in a bit and can’t figure out why it’s not powering up ;)
  • I love that the battery pack locks to the frame for security but feel that the key is positioned in a vulnerable spot where the crank arm can hit it if you’re not careful
  • It’s nice that you can charge the battery while it’s on the bike but the rubber flap designed to cover the charging port at the base of the downtube doesn’t stay down very well, I feel its design could be improved
  • The battery pack slides up into the downtube so getting it out can be a little tricky and definitely requires two hands, you have to unlock it then sort of pull down (but not so hard that it hits the fender or ground if you aren’t careful)
  • I like that you can shift gears while at standstill on this bike because it has an internally geared eight speed hub but for the gear to actually change I’ve found you can’t be pushing very hard… so when riding I back off a bit when shifting (especially when climbing)
  • The Brose motor system uses cadence and torque measurements to activate and is fairly responsive but does not have shift sensing, that’s less of an issue on an internally geared hub drivetrain like the Shimano Nexus Inter8 here

Resources:

Trusted Advertisers

More BULLS Reviews

BULLS SIX50 E 1.5 Review

  • MSRP: $3,099
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A hardtail trail ready e-bike with comfortable plus sized tires and a spring suspension fork (with lockout), sturdy tapered head tube, rigid thru-axles, and Boost. Capable as a commuting platform if you prefer a mountain bike vs. hybrid or city…...

BULLS Cross Lite E Step-Thru Review

  • MSRP: $4,099
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

An active, sporty looking, commuter style electric bike with low standover height, available in three frame sizes to improve fit and comfort. High-end drivetrain and motor systems, you get eleven gears with a tough mountain bike level…...

BULLS SIX50+ E FS 3 Review

  • MSRP: $4,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

An all-mountain electric bike with plus sized tires for improved stability, traction and comfort, 150 mm air suspension with compression and rebound adjust. Battery and motor mount design are tighter than older Bosch systems, weight is kept low…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO 45 FS Review

  • MSRP: $5,199
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A high quality full suspension e-mountain bike that's also a speed pedelec (capable of 28 mph top speeds), solid hydraulic disc brakes, wide thru-axles with Boost Technology. Adjustable 150 mm RockShox suspension front and rear, four-bar rear swing arm to reduce brake…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO 3 Carbon 27.5 Plus Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A Carbon fiber electric cross country mountain bike with premium components and ultra-integrated motor and battery system, excellent weight distribution. The Brose motor is quiet and responsive offering up to 90 Nm of torque output,…...

BULLS DAIL-E Grinder Review

  • MSRP: $5,799
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

One of the first Gravel Grinder style electric bikes to make it to America! Made with premium components, high performance lights and a purpose built frame in three sizes. Capable of high speed 28 mph performance, the Bosch centerdrive motor measures bike speed, pedal…...

BULLS SIX50 E2 Street Review

  • MSRP: $3,899
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A fully equipped speed commuter capable of 28 mph operation, running on the proven Bosch Performance mid-drive motor and updated 500 watt hour Samsung battery. Extra large 203 mm hydraulic disc brakes offer smooth solid stops without requiring exorbitant hand…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Plus Review

  • MSRP: $4,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

A stealthy full suspension all-mountain electric bike with longer travel 150 mm suspension, fully adjustable air fork by RockShox, color matched to frame. Larger 37 volt 17.5 amp hour battery pack to assist with steeper climbs and longer…...

BULLS Monster E FS Review

  • MSRP: $5,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

Full suspension fat bike with a high quality mid-drive motor from Bosch and their updated 500 watt hour battery pack for extended range. Cool fluorescent paint job that extends all the way through the fork, rear shock housing,…...

BULLS Lacuba EVO E45 Review

  • MSRP: $4,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2017

Available in four frame sizes, two styles (high-step and mid-step) with an adjustable stem, active-comfort saddle and ergonomic grips, this bike can fit well and feel good at speed and over long distances. Capable of 28 mph top speeds, this is a Class 3 electric bike with an…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Review

  • MSRP: $4,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An all-mountain electric bike with beautifully integrated battery, motor and display... it blends in more than most other e-mountain bikes I've tested and runs quiet. Sturdy 15 mm thru axle in the front and 12 mm axle in the rear…...

BULLS SIX50 E FS 3 RSI Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A loaded full suspension mountain bike with premium electric drivetrain from Bosch offering 75 Nm of climbing torque with the CX motor and a 400 watt hour Samsung battery. RockShox air suspension with 120 mm travel front and rear for solid trail or all…...

BULLS Monster E S Review

  • MSRP: $4,299
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

Premium hardtail electric fat bike with all the fixins, highlights include rear rack bosses, tubeless-ready tires and punched out rims, RockShox air fork with remote lockout and high torque Bosch CX motor. Quality 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes from Shimano for excellent stopping power and modulation, impressive…...

BULLS Outlaw E45 Review

  • MSRP: $3,999
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A sporty looking, fairly comfortable speed pedelec capable of ~28 mph top speeds, it's running on an optimized geared hub motor design with heat pipe technology for maximum performance. Unique mid-mount battery box fills the main frame triangle keeping weight low and centered while…...

BULLS Sturmvogel E EVO Review

  • MSRP: $3,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A beautifully designed urban electric bike painted white for visibility and modern appeal, white walled tires, reflective sidewall stripes, LED lights. Extra sturdy and durable thanks to a 15 mm thru-axle on the front wheel (with…...

BULLS TWENTY9 E FS 3 RSI Review

  • MSRP: $4,599
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

A full suspension, Bosch powered, cross country style electric bike with efficient 29" wheels, it's available in three sizes for good fit and would feel taller and larger for riders with long legs but still fits some shorter riders given the angled top tube. Quick release for both wheels ads convenience for fixes and transporting the bike, I love…...

BULLS Cross Lite E Review

  • MSRP: $3,699
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

Fully loaded urban electric bicycle with great accessories for commuting including an aluminum rear rack, full length fenders with mud flaps and integrated LED lights. Relatively light weight at under 50 lbs, this is due in part to the nicer…...

BULLS E-Stream EVO FS Enduro 27.5 Review

  • MSRP: $5,399
  • MODEL YEAR: 2016

An enduro style full suspension electric mountain bike with longer 160 mm suspension travel, seat post dropper, 27.5" wheelset and premium hydraulic brakes. Downtube-integrated battery pack is out of sight and keeps weight low and centered across the…...


PDieter
7 months ago

Court, I suspect that you don’t want to charge that battery with either port… I suspect the BMS only protects one side. I’m basing this on the experience that if your bms goes out you can reverse charge a battery still by rigging a cord for the other port.

Court Rye
7 months ago

Hmm, interesting feedback! Thanks for chiming in. I might have gotten some incorrect information or just misspoke. Would be good to confirm this with a dealer or as you suggest, just use the charging port that is exposed when mounted to the bike. That one is clearly going to work :)

Charging Brose Batteries
6 months ago

You are able to charge from either port.

Court Rye
6 months ago

Awesome, thanks for sharing your feedback on this :)

Pdieter
6 months ago

A little semantic help for you on the “affordable” stumble; it’s a “good value”. Keep up the good work.

Court Rye
6 months ago

Right… thanks, I do my best but there’s lots of room for improvement. I suppose that being around $5k+ ebikes regularly has had an influence on me and my language isn’t always on target (I do a little bit of editing before posting videos and stuff like this usually gets a second consideration). Here on the site I’ve got an “affordable” category that’s more rigid, the bikes have to be in the $1,500 range which I hope truly is “affordable” and not just “good value” ;)

Adam @ BULLS eBIKES
6 months ago

Hey Court,

Great review, as always! A couple updates and information bits that pertain to all the BULLS Brose mid-drive eBIKES.

  1. New software updates for Brose include a “wake” function, which means the bike can be turned on and off at the handlebar display control, in addition to the downtube.
  2. Which I mentioned in a previous reply is that the battery can be charged from either port. As you correctly assert, one plugs into the bike while inserted. The other allows charging to occur while inserted.
  3. The key is not necessary for reinstalling the battery, as long as the lever is in the open position. Typically this would be when the greatest risk for getting the key stuck or broken off would be.

Hope this helps clarify.
-Adam

Court Rye
6 months ago

This is very helpful Adam, thanks for chiming in as an official source and clarifying. I’ll keep this in mind for future Bulls reviews and welcome you to join in on the EBR forums and any future comments here :)

Adam
6 months ago

You bet Court. I’m trying to keep an eye on the forums. Lots of great questions and helpful feedback.

Court Rye
6 months ago

Really appreciate you Adam!

Rusty
6 months ago

Court, Your review of the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 was most informative. I am a newbie to ebikes, and trying to learn all I can. Your technical reports are a big help in teaching us about the pros and cons about the different ebikes. My wife and I are senior citizens in our seventies, and I believe the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 seems to be the bike for us. We will be riding where there are some long grades in the high country. Question: If need be, can it be ridden with motor power only, or does it require some constant peddling? Keep up the good work. Regards, Rusty

Court Rye
6 months ago

Hi Rusty! I sure do like the Bulls Lacuba E8 but it does require constant pedaling because it’s a Class 1 Pedal Assist bike vs. Class 2 which has throttle. BionX makes an excellent line of motors that have a throttle mode and you can buy them pre-installed on bikes from OHM and others, check out the OHM Urban XU700 here. It’s an awesome bike with the same step-thru frame… the company offers a good warranty and is a bit bigger and more reliable than some. Biria also makes a deep step-thru with the BionX system and I just finished reviewing theirs here. I hope this helps you out, sounds like you and your wife will have a great timeout there on bikes again and the electric motor should help flatten those hills ;)

Sanford Simmons
4 months ago

Your written write up states the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8 2017 has a 350 watt motor. Is that true or is it a 250 Watt motor?

Court Rye
4 months ago

Hi Sanford, great catch and I do apologize for the inconsistency between my writeup vs. the specs, I’ve fixed it! In short, the motor ranges from 250 to about 530 watts depending on power level selected and the signals being sent (pedal torque and speed). I think I made this error because the Brose system reminds me of Bosch in many ways which officially says 350 watts nominal but they use the exact same hardware as in Europe where it’s rated 250 nominal. Sometimes I feel like it’s marketing more than reality given the range of power possibilities. Hope this helps! The Lacuba is a solid choice but there are other drive systems out there worth exploring if you’re concerned :)

William Hamilton
3 months ago

Hi Court. I live in a level area near the beach. I want to take advantage of a new bike right of way along side a new light rail extension very close to home. Should I therefore avoid 28 mph ebikes? I’m 68 yrs. old and am also a bit concerned about crashing while going 28…I test rode a 28 mph model recently and it did seem a little hairy going that fast along side traffic on regular streets. Do folks regret gettiing a 20 mph model such as this model Lacuba after they’ve become accustomed to riding an ebike and then wishing they bought a faster model? I’ve enjoyed your reviews very much. Thank you for any comments.

Court Rye
3 months ago

Hi William! I have only ever owned 20 mph ebikes myself and never felt like I was missing out. For me it’s important to blend in, avoid breaking any rules (since I’m kind of a public figure) and be an ambassador for the space. I still really enjoy riding my unpowered bicycle and feel like that can be fast! If you’re someone who loves speed, needs to get to your destination as fast as possible or want to gain respect from cars (some people feel like if they ride the same speed as cars they aren’t challenged as much) then speed pedelec might be the way to go. I think it makes the most sense for people who ride on the shoulders of streets… You can ride them slower btw, it’s not like it forces you to hit the top speed. I just tend to get Class 1 ebikes since they are more plentiful and I ride on bike paths and occasional mountain trails. Hope this helps!

William Hamilton
3 months ago

Thank you for your remarks. Keep up the good work.

Albin Larsson
2 months ago

Hi Court, great review as always. I really enjoy your reviews on ebikes, you’ve helped me a lot learning about them and I’m gonna buy my first ebike this summer, it’s looking like it might be this one! I just have one question first. How are the gears on this bike when pedalling without electric assistance? Maybe you could give a comparison to another ebike and a regular bike? I don’t have a place where I can try this model out and I’m probably gonna be biking a bit without electric assistance as well so I’d like it to be at least decent. Thanks in advance! /Albin

Court Rye
2 months ago

Hi Albin, the eight-speed internally geared hub doesn’t shift as fast and hard as many traditional derailleur sprocket combinations but it won’t mash, come out of tune or get as dirty either. At ~56 lbs, this isn’t one of the lighter ebikes but it’s also not bad considering you get fenderd, rack and a suspension fork… if you added those options to another ebike it would probably weigh similar if it had similar specs. I really like the Lacuba EVO E8 and appreciate belt drive systems in general. The belt doesn’t bounce around or come off as easily and you with that eight speed, you can definitely pedal the bike unpowered just fine, the tires are efficient and the fork locks out if it is bobbing up and down and you want to conserve as much pedal efficiency as possible. I hope this helps to answer your question, I realize test riding before buying would be ideal but this is a high quality product. If it fits your budget and delivers the features you want then I think you’ll be happy with it. The Brose drive system is awesome and I like how clean the battery integration is here.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

San Diego Fly Rides
6 hours ago

Yay! A new e-biker! I definitely understand the concern about the bike getting stolen. I'd second Dewey's recommendations. We use ABUS folding locks at our shop and I use the New York U-lock for personal usage.

In terms of bikes you might be interested in, I'd be less concerned about weight more about it being the right size. It sounds like you want something with that's easy to mount and dismount, so stick to step-thru frames (also sometimes called low-step) or wave frames. I'd start by checking out the Bulls Cross Lite E or the Bulls Lacuba Evo E8. These are both bikes that are great on hills and great from stops. Basically, you're looking for a higher torque to accelerate more quickly out of the gate. Both Bosch and Brose motors offer higher torques. If you want something a bit cheaper, check out the IZIP Dash. Still a great commuter bike, but definitely going to save you some money.

I'd say the ultimate in security would be to take the bike into work with you, so you might also want to consider some foldable options. Most foldable electrics can easily fit underneath a desk. This way it's with you all day. My favorites are the Blix Vika+ and the Tern Vektron. Let us know if you have any questions!

Ravi Kempaiah
23 hours ago

Just came back from the Ebike expo. I had a blast! I was surprised at the number of bikes that fit me. Though the following bikes fit me, I eliminated them for various reasons one izip, two Raleigh bikes, gazelle, trek Neko, bulls cross lite, and the Electra townie (so comfortable!). I did like the trek lift+, smart motion Ecity, and the bulls lacuna evo E8. They did not have a Kalkhoff Agutta B7 but I did discover that the Bosch high performance motor that comes with it is amazing! Comments on my final four are welcome. You guys have been a big help in my search for a bike. Your time and expertise is much appreciated. Thank you!

Townie Go
Lacuba EVO E8
Crosslite-E with the new Bosch CX motor.

All great bikes. Glad the bike expo was useful.

Since kozy's carry a lot of the bikes you mentioned, you should visit them.

art newcomer
2 weeks ago

Rider Height: 5'4
In-seam: 30 inches
Rider weightt: 168lbs

Bulls Lacuba E8 step-through vs Bulls Lacuba E45 Step-through.

E8 has the belt drive. internal hub. 20mph. Smallest Size : 45cm/17.72in. 250 watts. $3,899
E45 has Deore XT. 28mph. Smallest Size: 47.98 cm / 18.89 in. 350 watts. $4,299

Concerns:- Maintenance.
Rider is not a super experienced bike rider. The bike will be used as a daily commuter. 14 miles round trip every day and the occasional grocery shopping. Rider prefers to have a bike that doesn't look like an e-bike and the LacuBRA just looks like it fits the bill. E8 is winning slightly because of the 'low maintenance' but LBS has told me that such concerns are not valid and that I wouldn't have any issues with the Deore XT for years to come.

Location: Pacific north west. Lots of rain.

Any thoughts? Comments? Suggestions? Recommendations?
I bought the Lacuba E8 for myself and the wave version for my wife. Couldn't be happier with the decision. The photo in this post must be an older picture, as the battery is more integrated. I wanted to stay Class1 and prefer the internal hub. With the Brose motor, I find it unnecessary to have more than 8 gears anyway. What is noticeable about shifting is you don't need to be pedaling for a chain to move onto the next sprocket. With the internal hub, I stop pedaling, shift and resume pedaling. This works nicely when you are traversing streets, as you can go from 8 to 1 with no proble.

Ravi Kempaiah
3 weeks ago

ATOM Diamony City Wave.

I love the look of this bike. I got to test it for a day but I want different and shorter and wider tires. What I like about this bike is the look and the mid-drive motor and the upright position. I'm short and I want to put a 24 or 26" tires and maybe like 2.4 or 2.8 wide tires.

I have to go to a shop 45 miles from me because local shops don't want to work on an electric one. If I take it to a shop, how much can I expect to be charged for this service provided that I also supply the tires?

Any recommendations for pavement fat tires?

It would be an expensive project.
You have to change the whole front and rear wheel. Since the rear wheel used an internal geared hub, you have to find a compatible 26" wheel and lace it with new spokes.

Also, the frame can't take more than 2.2" tires. It is simply not designed for that kind width and not to mention the fender rub issue and then you have to find matching fenders.

Here is a bike that retains many of the things you liked in the ATOM wave. BULLS Lacuba EVO E8- wave. Has bigger battery than the ATOM, much nicer components and the 48cm frame would fit you well.
it is sped'd with 2" tires as well.

TruTru9
3 weeks ago

Rider Height: 5'4
In-seam: 30 inches
Rider weightt: 168lbs

Bulls Lacuba E8 step-through vs Bulls Lacuba E45 Step-through.

E8 has the belt drive. internal hub. 20mph. Smallest Size : 45cm/17.72in. 250 watts. $3,899
E45 has Deore XT. 28mph. Smallest Size: 47.98 cm / 18.89 in. 350 watts. $4,299

Concerns:- Maintenance.
Rider is not a super experienced bike rider. The bike will be used as a daily commuter. 14 miles round trip every day and the occasional grocery shopping. Rider prefers to have a bike that doesn't look like an e-bike and the LacuBRA just looks like it fits the bill. E8 is winning slightly because of the 'low maintenance' but LBS has told me that such concerns are not valid and that I wouldn't have any issues with the Deore XT for years to come.

Location: Pacific north west. Lots of rain.

Any thoughts? Comments? Suggestions? Recommendations?

Jim Chase
4 weeks ago

I think I have narrowed down to these two bikes. I will be traveling some long biked paths and streets which are quite hilly. I am 5 8 170. I love the look and distance of the bulls. Like the throttle of the elby. Anyone ride either or both.

JoeinJP
1 month ago

WMV, what bike did you decide on? I've owned the Pedego City Commuter and was mostly happy with it...quality components and features, BB7 disc brakes, nice LCD display, integrated lights etc...the disadvantage being rear-heavy with the battery placement. My replacement after its theft was the Ejoe folding bike for more security, and while the balance is better, comparing a folding bike vs full-size is apples vs oranges, Ejoe just serving the purpose of commuting. Also the reason for my post is I'm looking at the Rook or Bulls Lacuba as a possible future purchase.

Rincon
1 month ago

Court: The very idea of having a single thread to contain every known issue with a manufacturer's products is itself defective. Consider Bulls' product line. They have 28 e-bike models for 2017, just in the US. If they keep the same number of models for 2018, that will be 56 versions of e-bikes each with their own issues just a few months from now. Who would dig through the "all known issues" thread in 2020 (112 unique model-years) to find what's wrong with their Lacuba? The larger the thread grows, the more unwieldy it gets, until it is completely unmanageable. It facilitates the immediate loss of valuable information. The thread will contain stale, confusing, difficult to locate, and absolutely muddled data amplified by cross-conversation dialogs. Let's assume there are three issues for each model per year. For Bulls in 2020 that's 3 x 112 or 336 cross-conversations in the same thread.

An issue regarding a bike, for each model year, is best organized in a single thread focused on that one issue. In that thread you will find specific comments pertaining to that issue and only to that issue. In a catchall thread you'll find everything about every model in every year with answers about one question intermixed with answers from other models and other years. As people reply referencing a model, but not a year, or an issue but not the model, the thread will become ever more muddled.

An all-in-one thread is optimistic and even hopeful, but really it is a simplistic answer to a complex data problem. Some people will undoubtedly use it. Most will continue to post and search for focused answers--with the thread title as their guide. But the all-in-one thread is not benign. It will make finding an answer MORE difficult as it grows by lumping together data for all models and all years and all issues. It will come up in virtually all search results, but the answer will be increasingly difficult to discern as the thread grows.

Perhaps you envisioned the all-issues thread to be a clean index of issues? That would be nice, but as @pxpaulx noted it would require a curator to cull the forum and post summaries and links with make, model, and year. That would be valuable. However the all-in-one threads have already devolved into the standard Q&A discussion and wandering-off-topic format.

This forum is a knowledge base. The thread is its basic unit of information storage. That means the thread is designed to contain a unique and focused bit of knowledge. The all-in-one thread controverts the native organization of this data at its most fundamental level. All-in-one Q&A as implemented is a repository for data noise and search pollution. I say this with 22 years of full text database design, programming, and management behind me. The EBR knowledge base will survive and continue to be useful, but that usefulness will be degraded as the all-in-one threads grow over the years.

pxpaulx
2 months ago

I'm now leaning towards getting a commuter bike instead of a mountain bike. Most of my riding will be on paved roads, and I now think I'll enjoy having the fenders, lights, and racks built into the bike. I'm leaning towards the izip bikes as they appear to be a great value and have the twist throttle. I'm trying to decide between the dash and the pro tour. Does anyone have any thoughts on each bike? Is the pro tour basically the same bike with a sleeker battery and fancier display system? I also saw that izip's website has a sale on 2016 dash for $1,000 discount. Has the 2017 dash changed much?

They are 2 different motors, one 350w the other 500w - both are speed pedelecs, max 28mph. Both of the batteries are only 417wh - this is a little behind the bigger players (or a lot...) - bosch and yamaha motors now come with 500wh batteries, and bulls has a brose bike with 650wh batteries as well. Also, don't pay retail - shop around (local if possible and online) and negotiate a price you're comfortable with.

Check out these reviews - a little more money than the izip brand, but they are running the best motors in the business (transx is a known company, but not as established as bosch or brose):

Bulls six50 E2 Street:

https://electricbikereview.com/bulls/six50-e2-street/

Bulls Lacuba 45 (there is a normal high step version along with the step through Court reviewed):

https://electricbikereview.com/bulls/lacuba-evo-e45/

Haibike also has a couple of treking and MTB Xduro 'S' versions that are 28mph as well - check out their website as Court hasn't reviewed any of this year's models yet.

...also and a new raleigh 28mph with a brose motor, though no suspension:

https://electricbikereview.com/raleigh/redux-ie/

E-Wheels
2 months ago

Absolutely new to Ebikes, and this website, and with that comes outstanding ignorance.

I'm looking for an Ebike that can make it up hills with a bit of ease (so mid-drive?), that doesn't have too many wires and cables, uses a hydraulic brake system, has a rear and/or front racks, doesn't make much or any noise when using the motor, and looks "professional" or "polished."

This would be a commuter/urban/cargo bike. I am in the USA, male, 5' 11,'' 160 lbs.

I've looked at how some of the specs for an Ebike effect performance (motor output in watts, battery voltage in amp/watt hours, motor torque in newton meters), yet I don't know to what degree all of these matter. I've also seen some bikes were the variables are almost identical yet the mile range difference is drastic.

I also don't know what brands are quality and which aren't. I also don't know how much I should be paying for anything.

I've looked at these bikes so far:

Faraday Cortland: (https://electricbikereview.com/faraday/cortland/)
Gazelle NL C7 HMB (https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/nl-c7-hmb/)
Walleräng M.01 (https://electricbikereview.com/wallerang/m-01/)

The Faraday is what I first started looking at, but I have no clue if it has enough power or not/if it's worth the price. It is, however, quiet and looks amazing.

The Gazelle has great colors, but some of the main parts of the bike look non-durable or ready to break, there are many wires hanging about, and front basket is too clunky.

The Walleräng looks fantastic, has mid-drive, 500w motor output at max, and has (what I think to be) high quality parts and pieces, but it's seems a bit loud. Is that standard? This is the best ebike out of the 3 I have really examined.

For anyone willing to help me out, this is a sizable post, I am open to all knowledge of Ebikes, opinions on brands, opinions on bikes I've listed, and any suggestions you have of Ebikes that would be best fit for me.

Thank you in advance.
The quietest mid drive on the market at the moment is the Brose motor. If you combine the Brose system that with a Gates carbon belt and an IGH (Nuvinci, Shimano Alfine, Rohloff......) then you will probably have the quietest mid drive ebike you can get at the moment. If you want to research some Brose mid drive ebikes I suggest you check out the Scott E-Silence, Specialized Vado and Bulls Lacuba range. What is your budget.

vincent
2 months ago

Dave i dont have the bulls lacuba but rode it at a shop, it ROCKS

Very cool bike, if i could get 3 inch tires on it would buy it right away!!

I am adamant about plus or fat tires on my bikes or it would have come home with me lol

Saratoga Dave
2 months ago

Sorry you had such a colorful experience,but I would be very interested in hearing more about your opinions of the bike itself as you get familiar with it. I had thought my next one - and first torque sensor bike vs cadence - would be a Specialized Turbo of some flavor, but that ship seems to have sailed and I'm not loving the Vados. I'm getting very interested in the Bulls bikes, particularly the e45 Lacuba. My usual trip (non commuter) is around 30 - 35 miles mixed side roads and bike paths with lots of medium hills, right at and over the capacity for my battery, so I need to up the bike a couple of pegs.

I really love the way they've integrated the battery on the new ones, but again would enjoy following your experiences with mid drive and Bulls. I bet there's other Turbo aficionados with the same interest around here as well.

James Kohls
3 months ago

Time for an update!

Since I received my 2015 Specialized Turbo-X at the beginning of August last year, I still love riding this bike almost every day. The only exceptions have been when it was in for service @ ~1,200 miles and had warranty work done on the brakes. That and about 5 days where snow was too deep to ride. Otherwise, I’ve ridden this bike through an entire Minnesota winter with temps dropping to -10 degrees F (-23 degrees C). It has gone through ice, all types of snow and even torrential thunderstorms.

This last Thursday, I achieved my highest mileage on the battery riding about 35 miles and getting home with 60% remaining capacity! How? For starters, this was a group ride at a pace of only 10MPH average. Speed (in particular wind resistance) is the biggest killer of battery power. The second reason, due to the slow pace, I spent much of the time switching between ECO 40 and zero-assistance mode. On flat level ground in a nice low gear, switching to zero-assistance is very manageable. Mind you, this is not powered off, but the setting just below ECO. This prevents the cogging feeling/drag the motor would exhibit if powered off.

I recently added a BodyFloat suspension seat post which really helps make this a long distance trekking machine. That and swapping out the Trigger Sports for Schwalbe Energizer Plus tires have been the two smartest investments I’ve made.

With all that being said, one might be surprised I have been saving up for another eBike.

Why?

After owning my Turbo X as a first step towards switching away from driving, I’ve come to the conclusion that I will certainly become car free in the future. My plans are still to keep my car until it dies or become unreasonably expensive to fix. With my current use, it truly costs me less than $40 a month to keep around. But I want to be prepared to say goodbye to owning an automobile when that day finally comes.

When my brakes failed on the Turbo, back in January, I came to the decision that I really want a backup bike that equals or bests my current bike. Sure, I could get a 2nd Turbo, but why not add some utility.

If money were no object (which it is), my dream would be to buy a Riese & Muller Load or Packster. But I would also like a bike that helps me achieve a true 365 day ride schedule through the worst of what Minnesota winters can throw at me. So my second thought is to buy a fat bike. I’ve found my browser navigating itself to Specialized’s Levo Comp Fat page many times. I love Specialized and having a dealer less than 3 blocks from my house, that I trust, is worth its weight in gold. Then again, I find it hard to convince myself to spend almost twice as much on a backup bike as I did on my primary commuter.

I’ve even considered just buying another commuter bike with greater range. I really like the Bulls Lacuba, the Mustache StarckBike Asphalt and the HaiBike XDURO Trekkng S. My biggest fear with this route is, what if I like it more than my Turbo!?

Regardless, I have every intention of making 2017 the year I get a second eBike. More to follow…

Lenny
3 months ago

Hi all,
I am a 42 year old 6'0" chubby guy pushing 280 lbs and I need to get back on the bike to commute for health and sanity sake. I ride 16-22 miles round trip to work over some hilly roads. Right now on my commuter bike I take about an hour to do the trip when I am feeling good. I want an e-bike to speed things up a bit for the commute. I have narrowed down my choices between the Izip E3 Dash or the Bulls Lacuba Evo for a commuter e-bike and need some input. Price wise the Izip is a little easier to digest where as the Bulls looks like a better motor and battery. So looking for suggestions and input?

BULLS Lacuba EVO 45 or the belt drive version EVO are really high-quality bikes built for heavy duty use. BULLS also has bigger battery (650Whr compared to 418whr on the izip) which means you can do a complete roundtrip commute without recharging at office. Lower the capacity, more charge cycles for the same distance. If you are going to be putting 20 miles everyday, we suggest you go with the higher capacity version. There are lots of benefits to this. One day if you just want to use the highest level of assist for your commute, you won't have worry about running out of charge and you won't have worry about upgrading your batteries for 2 more years.

BULLS is slightly on the heavier side (although not so much compared to izip).

I would also recommend you look at Six50 E2 street. This would be a better commuter bike than the 2 you mentioned.

http://www.bullsebikes.com/product/six50-e-2-street/

vincent
3 months ago

I know the bulls is more money but between the 2 of those i would definitely get the bulls

That lacuba is a nice bike

have a rover too and although not in the same class as the bulls lacuba it is fine for the price
The fat tires are very comfortable to ride

Josh973
3 months ago

Hi all,
I am a 42 year old 6'0" chubby guy pushing 280 lbs and I need to get back on the bike to commute for health and sanity sake. I ride 16-22 miles round trip to work over some hilly roads. Right now on my commuter bike I take about an hour to do the trip when I am feeling good. I want an e-bike to speed things up a bit for the commute. I have narrowed down my choices between the Izip E3 Dash or the Bulls Lacuba Evo for a commuter e-bike and need some input. Price wise the Izip is a little easier to digest where as the Bulls looks like a better motor and battery. So looking for suggestions and input?

pxpaulx
3 months ago

If you do get to a bulls dealer, make sure to ride a brose powered model along with the six 50 you've mentioned. Either one of the e stream evo mtbs or the lacuba evo 28th. You also get the huge 650wh battery with the brose models which is really nice and extremely well integrated imho!

Chris Nolte
3 months ago

+1 for Riese & Müller, it I might have some bias since I sell the brand. Technically you can tour on anything, but some of their bikes are setup particularly well for that.

The R&M Delite and Charger have dual battery options which can certainly add to the utility of the bikes.

The Bulls LaCuba could also work well or a Trekking bike from Haibike. I think getting something with a Bosch motor could be helpful since their are service centers throughout the world. It could make things a lot easier in the unlikely case that you have an issue with your motor system.

What sort of terrain and distances are you looking to do?

e-boy
4 months ago

I'm not asking for a one for all solution .
There is a section on EBR called categories , ie , City Style , Cargo , 28MPH , ect ...
I'm saying I'd like to see a Car Alternative section .
EBR reviewer Court , mentioned in his review of the Bulls LACUBA 45 , that he thought it was a good car replacement .
I'm simply curious what other eBikes in general forum members thought fit the category .

Actually the reviews first sentence is "The BULLS Lacuba EVO E45 is the kind of electric bicycle I’d choose in place of a car. "

Alex M
4 months ago

I'd like to see a car alternative / replacement category on the EBR website .
Are you writing an article on the subject, by any chance ? :)
You are using term "replacement" again. There is no such thing. Don't know why Court called that Lacuba " car replacement", - probably he didn't mean it literally. And there is no "one for all" alternative solution. It's about compromising and sacrificing. What people are willing to sacrifice, depends on the person's particular situation. Other members have defined what makes an ebike a viable car alternative, this should serve as a guideline. Creating "car alternative" category on EBR - I think this would be too much responsibility and likely it would be biased (inevitably so, due to everybody's different criteria).

Ex, velomobile https://electricbikereview.com/virtue-cycles/pedalist/ comes the closest to car in "looks", - could be important to some people. Better protection from weather, too - again, important to some and not to others.

IMO, any TRIke is closer to a car than a BIke. Those with big cargo basket will be closer yet. Somebody else wouldn't want to sacrifice comfort, stability and cargo-carrying for speed and ability to pedal it. It depends on how close to a car you want it to be - and again, what you need it for and where you'll be using it.

e-boy
4 months ago

I used the term car replacement as that was used by Court in his review of the Bulls LACUBA 45 .
I'd like to see a car alternative / replacement category on the EBR website .

Alan Acock
4 months ago

I had a chance to ride the Bulls LACUBA E45 which was called a good car replacement by EBR .
What other eBikes do you consider good car replacements ?
I you can ride the bike year around were you live, they go for it. I would recommend getting a trailer for calling groceries. Some much younger riders look confused when I pass them pulling a trailer behind my Trek XM700+.

Chris Nolte
4 months ago

Some accessories that would be helpful include, fenders, rack, lights.

I would look at the Bulls LaCuba E45 and the E2 Street. Some other bikes that have been popular in the shop are the Riese & Müller Charger and the Delite. Both have the ability to run two batteries which could be helpful for longer trips.

Chris Nolte
4 months ago

I had a chance to ride the Bulls LACUBA E45 which was called a good car replacement by EBR .
What other eBikes do you consider good car replacements ?
Can you tell us a bit more about the yourself, your location, average distances for commute, etc. This stuff can be really helpful in making recommendations.

Also - I'm interested to know how you liked the Lacuba E45.

VideoNOLA
1 month ago

I'd love to know what the expected wear life is for those drive belts.

Veranda Tales
2 months ago

pros I like the no fuss belt drive and the overall clean design.
cons high price and lack of no flat tire

Lysle Basinger
2 months ago

I have an arm that fastens from the seat post to the front stem that allows for mounting on a bike rack. These were designed years ago for ladies bike frames.

Michael M
3 months ago

Thanks for all your reviews. Only two ebike stores in my city. Once tells Trek, the other sells proprietary brand called electrobike. Non sell Bulls, Haibike or many of the bikes you reviewed. You have reviewed Trek though. Your reviews of different models lets me view other brands before forking out $$$$. The only downside of ordering online is I cannot test ride these bikes before buying.

mattyj342111
4 months ago

please review the elite gt

Noukz37
4 months ago

Easy Motion Evo City for me and this baby for my lady, and who needs to buy a car, or have a garage even? When car is needed, renting and car-sharing will work perfectly. Buying a car is such a waste of money and resources.
P.S. Love your reviews Curt, you're becoming like an E-Bike God or sth :-D

TheEdge008
4 months ago

As usual, great review! Just curious, Court: Have you ever changed out a rear tire of a bike that has the Gates system? Is it easy?

mastachinn
4 months ago

I have Gates belt drive on two of my bikes and changing the rear tire is relatively easy.  It is just like a chain drive except your hands do not get greasy.  There is belt tension requirement but I find it is fairly lax.  The Bulls Lacuba appears to have two fasteners on each side of the rear drops for easy adjustment of the belt tension.

Luis Rodriguez
4 months ago

Hi, I have watched many of your reviews. I have a fat bike with a 2 stroke motor that I installed. But was disappointed by how lack of power has going up the hills. Too much pedaling going up the hill for a 69 year old guy. even considering that I practice the Triathlons export for many years. But I love bikes, so I am trying to decide on a electric fat bike that is powerfull enough to handle the mountains road of Puerto Rico. Any recommendations.? I will like to be under $2k price range. Thanks for any help you can provide.

David Macdonald
5 months ago

That's a proper sized battery I think they should all come with a standard 20 amp battery to properly make these bikes really take over from your car .

slappy76
5 months ago

I don't see any specs listed on the Bulls website regarding weight. Would a rider close to 280lbs be a suitable fit on a wave frame? How about the midstep?

عاشق موسيق
6 months ago

🙆🙋🙌👉😊

Nicky458itl
6 months ago

why that screen so much huge? smartphone size but like a baby-g watch information.

Nisco Racing
7 months ago

$4K Yeah some people will come up whit, i can buy a decent car for that price.

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

The challenge with a car is the cost of licensing, insurance and gas... it's a much more expensive purchase over the course of time

Joe Blogs
7 months ago

im really loving the design of the bulls bikes

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Me too, this one especially looks very good... clean

250 watts
7 months ago

https://www.e-bikeshop.co.uk/downloads/yamaha/Yamaha-PW-X-eBike-System-2017.pdf

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Yamaha has a really nice battery design, I like the side-slide concept

Duncan Carr
7 months ago

I've been using a Haibike 26 XDuro RC to cycle to work & back for 7 months solid. The journey is 20 miles a day (10 each way - obviously!). My battery - it was almost new - only just manges to manage the 20 miles - at full assistance. Also, if I turn the power off, it is like cycling in treacle, in no way similar to a regular bike. I guess the motor causes a large hindrance when lacking any power. I flipping love it though. 22 mph everywhere. Nice.

Terry Brightwater
7 months ago

Nice bike ;0) Great review :0)

Terry Brightwater
7 months ago

Yes totally agree, love the tech and design ;0) I am really enjoying the evolution of e bike design and tech :0) I am amazed how much it has changed in the last 3 to 4 years! Really appreciate your regular reviews and constant enthusiasm ;0)
 

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Thanks Terry, I really appreciate your support and I'm sure Bulls does as well. I thought this was an amazing combination of tech like the geared hub, belt drive and beautiful mid-drive and hidden battery :)

Sita van Waarde
7 months ago

I Am realy impressed of how you revieus bikes 👍🏼👍🏼

Sita van Waarde
7 months ago

I had a car Its. Nice to have but i ride not verry far from home most of THE times
A electric bike is a Nice replacement for a car
I tink a lot about E bikes for a fuw Years
Its a lot of money so iT needs to be near purfect for what i whis

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Thanks, I do my best! Do you have an electric bike or are you exploring trying to find the perfect one :)

Yulian Baskoro
7 months ago

6:16 XDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

ElectricBikeReview.com
6 months ago

Great feedback, thanks for chiming in Lenny!

Robert Wetzel
6 months ago

+Crazy Lenny's Ebikes Thank you! So I will consider it :)

Crazy Lenny's Ebikes
6 months ago

We had a rider do several century rides on one of the BULLS bike equipped with Brose motor. No sign of overheating. The motor gets warm ( 40'c) or so but no thermal cut off.

Robert Wetzel
7 months ago

Oh the maturity of your audience. Great review, and you're right, this is pretty close to a decent car replacement.
One question, though: I've heard in two other (german language) reviews on youtube and read in a magazine that the Brose motor has a tendency to overheat due to some ventilation issues, esepcially after prolonged use under stress (long uphills).
Can you confirm or deny this?

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Ah yes... big nutz

pipeman451
7 months ago

Great review as always and one beautiful machine. Now remove the speed limit and get it down to say 3500 and send me one. I'm assuming most are built off shore where manufacturing cost is incredibly cheap since they're all built in a small handful of facilities to brand specs. When the price is right I'll pony up. Until then when spring comes around it's a radrover for me. Although it certainly has penash doesn't it. Keep up the great job and I'll be sending my thumbs up along the way.

jeremy scarsone
3 months ago

Ive had the rad rover for four months and love it but after watching these reviews I just ponied up for the bulls e45 to ride in the spring/summer. Should be here in a few days. Some people are not able to drive for certain reasons or just don't want to pay for the gas and insurance. Keep all these wonderful reviews coming court.

ElectricBikeReview.com
7 months ago

Thanks! I've got another Bulls speed pedelec review in the works, very cool platform I'm sure you'll enjoy checking out. But yeah, also still a bit expensive ;)