BULLS E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Plus Review

Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Electric Bike Review
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Brose 250 Watt Geared Mid Motor
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Hidden Removable Battery Pack
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Mountain Bars Locking Ergon Grips
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Transflective Control Button Interface
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Rockshox Yari Air Fork 150 Mm Travel
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Rockshox Monarch Rear Shock
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Magura 180 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Shimano Deore Xt Shadow Plus 22 Speed Drivetrain
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Skid Plate Stickers Protection
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Electric Bike Review
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Brose 250 Watt Geared Mid Motor
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Hidden Removable Battery Pack
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Mountain Bars Locking Ergon Grips
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Transflective Control Button Interface
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Rockshox Yari Air Fork 150 Mm Travel
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Rockshox Monarch Rear Shock
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Magura 180 Mm Hydraulic Disc Brakes
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Shimano Deore Xt Shadow Plus 22 Speed Drivetrain
Bulls E Stream Evo Fs 3 27 5 Plus Skid Plate Stickers Protection

Summary

  • A stealthy full suspension all-mountain electric bike with longer travel 150 mm suspension, fully adjustable air fork by RockShox, color matched to frame
  • Larger 37 volt 17.5 amp hour battery pack to assist with steeper climbs and longer rides, the motor, battery and display are seamlessly integrated and cables are internally routed
  • Fatter 2.8" plus sized tires absorb vibration, increase surface patch and reduce deflection, they pair well with the 27.5" diameter for quick maneuvering, both wheels have thru-axles and quick release
  • BULLS managed to squeeze in a bottle cage mounting point on the downtube, upgraded Ergon grips and Selle Royale saddle, premium Magura 180 mm hydraulic disc brakes but no seat post dropper

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Video Review

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Introduction

Make:

BULLS

Model:

E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Plus

Price:

$4,699

Body Position:

Forward

Suggested Use:

Trail, Mountain

Electric Bike Class:

Pedal Assist (Class 1)
Learn more about Ebike classes

Warranty:

2 Years Motor and Battery, 5 Years Frame

Availability:

Europe, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand

Model Year:

20172018

Bicycle Details

Total Weight:

54 lbs (24.49 kg)

Battery Weight:

7 lbs (3.17 kg)

Motor Weight:

6.61 lbs (2.99 kg)

Frame Material:

7005 Aluminium

Frame Sizes:

16.14 in (40.99 cm)17.32 in (43.99 cm)19.29 in (48.99 cm)21.26 in (54 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

31.5" Stand Over Height

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Matte Black with Gray and Red Accents

Frame Fork Details:

Rock Shox Yari RC 27.5 Solo Air, 150 mm Travel, 15 mm Maxle with Quick Release and Boost

Frame Rear Details:

Rock Shox Monarch Plus RT, 150 mm Travel, Rebound Adjust, 12 mm Thru Axle with QR

Attachment Points:

Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

22 Speed 2x11 Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus, 11-42T

Shifter Details:

Shimano Deore XT Triggers on Right and Left

Cranks:

FSA Cranks, 38T / 28T

Pedals:

Wellgo Alloy Platform, Cage STyle

Headset:

FSA Tapered 1 1/8"

Stem:

Alloy, 7° Angle, (70 mm, 80 mm)

Handlebar:

Low Rise, 740 mm Length, 25 mm Rise, 9° Bend

Brake Details:

Magura Hydraulic Disc with 180 mm Rotors, MT-5 4 Piston Front and MT-4 Piston Rear, Magura MT Levers

Grips:

Ergon VLG-168283 Locking, Flat

Saddle:

Selle Royal Seta M1

Seat Post:

Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

30.9 mm

Rims:

WTB ASYM i35, 32 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 14 Gauge Front 13 Gauge Rear, Black

Tire Brand:

Schwalbe Rocket Ron, 27.5" x 2.8"

Wheel Sizes:

27.5 in (69.85cm)

Tire Details:

Tubeless Ready, Folding, EVO Liteskin, Trail Star 3

Tube Details:

Presta Valve

Accessories:

Velo Battery Protector Pad

Other:

IP56 Ingress Rating, Boost Adds 10 mm to Hub Length in Font and 6 mm in the Rear, KMC X11E Chain, Formula Hubs

Electronic Details

Motor Brand:

Brose Drive T (Trekking)

Motor Type:

Mid-Mounted Geared Motor
Learn more about Ebike motors

Motor Nominal Output:

250 watts

Motor Peak Output:

530 watts

Motor Torque:

90 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

BMZ

Battery Voltage:

37 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

17.5 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

647.5 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium-ion

Charge Time:

4.5 hours

Estimated Min Range:

50 miles (80 km)

Estimated Max Range:

130 miles (209 km)

Display Type:

Fixed, Backlit Transflective LCD, BULLS CSI

Readouts:

Speed, Battery Level (5 Bars), Assist Level (None, Eco, Tour, Sport)

Display Accessories:

Independent Button Pad with Tactile Feedback on Left, 6 Volt Micro USB Port on Display

Drive Mode:

Advanced Pedal Assist (Cadence and Torque Sensing)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

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Written Review

Plus sized tires are becoming increasingly popular for electric bikes. That’s because they improve comfort a bit, increase your contact patch size resulting in better traction and they disperse some of the added weight that a motor and battery produce on the frame. I suppose they would have become popular more quickly with traditional pedal-powered mountain bikes except for the added drag and weight. With an e-bike, you’ve got electric assistance that more than compensates for a bit of drag and thus, more bikes are turning to these tires as a sweet spot between 2.25″ and the much larger 4″ fat tires often reserved for sand or snow riding. With the E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Plus you get 2.8″ wide plus sized tires whereas some competing bikes are opting for full 3″. I found these to perform similarly, perhaps they’re slightly lighter due to the lower volume of rubber? Another unique quality of the wheels on this bike are that the hubs use Boost technology which is to say, they are slightly longer. This allows for steeper spoke angles and a stronger more sturdy wheel as a whole.

Okay, with all of that tire and wheel stuff behind us, let’s chat about the drive system a bit. One of the coolest aspects of the Brose powered models from BULLS this year is that the battery pack and motor are extremely tightly integrated… nearly disappearing into the frame. This is a beautiful looking, well balanced and QUIET electric bicycle designed to Class 1 specifications, meaning it only assists up to 20 mph and does not offer a throttle. In many parts of California, that means you can legally ride it on mountain bike paths. It’s perceived as a human powered cycle first because it uses a combination of wheel speed, cadence and most importantly, pedal torque activated operation. Laws aside, what I found was a super-responsive mountain bike that felt comfortable even when riding near steep cliffs, as I did in the video review above. In this type of terrain, you don’t want a clunky or slow-to-react drive system because it could take you past the mark resulting in an accident.

The Brose motor used here offers a whopping 90 Nm of peak torque and a range of 250 to 530 watts power output. At high cadence, you can hear a pronounced electronic whirring noise but I’d consider it one of the quietest mid-drive systems on the market right now. This is due in large part to the addition of a belt link inside the motor case that reduces vibration. I’m only guessing but this might help to extend the life of conversion gears and as a rider, it does create a smoother feel than say, Bosch. Now, I’m a huge fan of Bosch and BULLS offers this drive system on many of their other mountain models… but it’s a lot zippier and the chainring is limited to just one sprocket. A huge differentiator with the Brose motor is that multiple chainrings can be used and in the case of the EVO FS 3 Plus, they opted for an 11 ring cluster in the rear with two rings up front. The shifter and derailleur hardware is higher-end Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus and although the motor does not offer shift sensing, I had no problem shifting without much mashing when I adjusted my shifting behavior a bit… making sure to ease off the torque pressure and thus, deactivating the motor before shifting.

This is a really fun and capable all-mountain electric bike. It has longer handle bars (as it should) locking Ergon grips for stability, a four-bar link suspension with quality RockShox components and the’ve even managed to squeeze in a bottle cage mount. One thing I’m not super fond of is how the battery pack locks in and charges on the bike. While I love that Bulls opted for the EnergyBus magnetic charging interface (that reduces bent pins and tipped bikes if tripped over) I don’t like the little rubber cover that’s used on the frame. It can be difficult to force into the charging port hole when not in use and I just feel like more dust and water will get in as a result. Also, you have to manually lock the battery in after clicking it onto the frame. It’s like a two step process where you use a keyed slot for locking the battery and a separate slider rod for disconnecting and taking off the pack. Perhaps this was intentional as twisting a key while holding a battery requires more finesse vs. sliding a rod while holding a battery… but in both cases you need to be extra careful not to drop the battery and in the former, if you leave your key in and forget, then later move the bike backwards the left crank arm may collide with and bend the key! It’s all just a little cramped and tedious. But at least it looks good, secures the battery properly and I like that they included foam pads on both the motor casing and battery case base to deflect rocks and other debris.

Having used this bike a bit on true mountain terrain as well as the popular Specialized Turbo Levo which also uses the Brose motor and has plus sized tires… I must say I enjoyed both. Priced at $4,699 I find the Bulls option to be quite tempting. And although they are somewhat new to the US market, their reputation in Europe and Asia is good and their warranty is reassuring. You get two years comprehensive and they are opening more and more dealers each year. My final thought is that it’s great to have a wider range of size options on this and other e-mountain bikes. This thing isn’t super light at ~54 lbs, nor is any other full suspension higher capacity build. Not having to worry about a frame that doesn’t fit or one with an unnecessarily high stand over height is nice. I appreciate the sloped top tube here and the overall stability of the geometry. Most of all, I just think it looks great. Big thanks to Bulls for partnering with me for this review.

Pros:

  • Available in four frame sizes for improved fit and comfort on longer rides, the top tube is angled as much as possible while still affording a vertical rear shock (lower weight distribution along with the battery and motor)
  • The electronics on this bike are extremely well integrated and hidden, the battery mounts up into the downtube, the motor completely replaces the bottom bracket with a custom interface and even the display panel is small and unobtrusive (just a toggle switch with little readouts) most wires are internally routed across the frame
  • The slightly larger 2.8″ wide tires offer more cushion, better traction and less deflection which makes them fun to ride on trails and mountainous terrain, the Schwalbe Rocket Ron model is designed with thinner sidewalls to reduce weight and are tubeless ready for further reduction while also permitting low PSI without “snake bite” tube punctures
  • Amazingly, despite the main triangle being mostly occupied by the rear suspension and tighter area due to the sloped top tube you are able to mount a bottle cage or other accessory using the bolts on top of the battery
  • Longer travel 150 mm suspension fork and 15 mm thru-axle makes this a great candidate for enduro and all-mountain riding, the rear 150 mm suspension is also solid with some adjustability on stiffness and you get a 12 mm axle there… both are quick release for easier maintenance and transportability
  • You get 22 gear combinations here with quality Shimano Deore XT Shadow Plus components, if you’re climbing a lot this comes in handy and the E-Stream EVO FS 3 27.5 Plus is one of the few mid-drive full suspension ebikes I’m aware of with that many gears
  • The Brose motor is very quiet and smooth thanks to a belt interface between the gearing parts that reduces vibration… I also found that it was responsive and quite powerful
  • I appreciate the upgraded touch points including locking Ergon grips and comfortable Selle Royal Seta M1 saddle
  • MT-4 and MT-5 hydraulic disc brake calipers from Magura (two and four piston models respectively) offer great stopping power, both rotors are 180 mm diameter for dispersing heat
  • The wheels are built with “Boost” which means they have longer hubs that allow for a stronger spoke angle and stiffer handling
  • Both the battery and motor casing have a layer of foam padding on the base for protection against rocks and gravel flying up as you ride, it’s not as tuff as some other BULLS ebikes with metal scuff plates but also doesn’t weigh as much
  • Despite being so small and compact, the toggle button / display panel thing near the left grip has a built in Micro USB charging port so you can power your phone or other portable electronic device!
  • Impressive two year comprehensive warranty, 1,000 full cycles on the battery and five years on the frame… this is a larger more established company with good support

Cons:

  • Be extra careful when keys are inserted into the battery lock as they are directly in the path of the left crank arm (which rotates backwards if you roll the bike backwards)
  • The battery comes out downwards from the downtube and while it’s secure once unlocked, if you’re pulling down to remove it there’s a bit more force at play due to gravity and that makes it easier to drop or mishandle
  • This is one of the only bike designs I’ve seen with a battery that can be clicked onto the bike but not locked (you have to purposefully lock the core using the keys), a secondary slide mechanism unclips the pack
  • I feel like the rubber flap covering the charging port on the lower left are of the downtube could work better, it doesn’t fit into the charging hole very easily and this means dust and water can get in
  • There’s no shift sensing technology on the electric bike drive system and considering you get 22 gear combinations, that means you’ll have to be extra thoughtful about how and when you shift, it’s torque sensing so just get up to speed then ease off while shifting before applying more pressure
  • I’m not sure this bike comes with a slap guard? Consider adding a neoprene wrap or sticker (even clear tape) to avoid chips on the right chain stay
  • Good combination of rolling momentum and quick handling with the 27.5″ wheel size here, I’ve found that they also don’t clip my toes as much as 29ers
  • Given the longer travel suspension I was surprised that they didn’t add a remote seat post dropper, this kind of thing is very handy when you start to do more downhill riding and the bike is priced pretty high so it would have been nice if it was included, here’s a solid dropper that would fit the 30.9 mm diameter of the bike for consideration

Resources:

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Pete
8 months ago

Hi Court! Just curious how much effort is it to pedal this and other similar weight FS MTB e-bikes at or above the 20 mph motor assist cut-off point? In other words, do you need “pro cyclist legs” to reach and maintain higher speeds (i.e., say 21 to 25 mph) on flat paved surfaces with no head wind pedaling in the highest gear (for this bike = 3.5 gear ratio) assuming pedaling at a high cadence (above 100-120 RPM)?

Reply
Court Rye
8 months ago

Hi Pete, in my experience it is very difficult to top and consistently maintain even 20 mph on flats with calm air if the motor is not supporting you. The added weight and friction of electric mountain bikes is a limiter. There are some eMountain bikes that have Class 3 drive systems which can hit ~28 mph but they are rare. This is just my experience and I haven’t focused on it as much as I should… I’d love to hear your experience if you can get out and test the theory. I regularly top 20 mph but it’s usually on downhill sections.

Reply
Yossi Geretz
3 months ago

I got this bike – E-Stream EVO 2 (hardtail). Here’s the good, the bad and the ugly.

The good: The bike is heavy, no doubt. Without assist, this moves like pulling a boat away from the dock with a rope in your teeth. Turn on the assist though and this bike is NIMBLE – moves like a dream! I love the fact that this has a huge 650 watt-hours battery, one of the largest I’ve seen. At level three assist, (4 is the max) in hilly territory, I am able to get 15 miles out of each bar. With 5 bars, this should get me 75 miles. Of course, I don’t like to shave it that close. As I mentioned, if I ever run out of juice it’ll be like towing a boat overland. But I’ve gone on a number of 45 mile runs and come back to base with two bars of juice left on the battery. The motor is silent and lends such a natural and smooth assist to your own effort. This bike makes biking fun again!!!

Here’s the bad and the ugly. HUGE design flaw, embedding the battery in the *bottom* of the downtube. Just this past Monday I locked in the battery and set off on a ride. I didn’t get far when I hit a bump at 20mph and CRASH, the battery just dropped out of position. Now the battery is dead and it’s my word against the dealer. I say I locked the battery in place, the dealer says no – user error. Not sure where this is going to go, but these batteries are $950. Not too happy right now…

Suggestion for manufacturer:

  1. For a minor bit of added engineering, you can ensure that the battery not make contact unless it is properly locked into position! This would clarify the point for every rider. If the battery is providing power, it’s locked in, otherwise it’s not.
  2. Why not embed the battery on the *topside* of the downtube? (Most e-bikes, even stealth bikes, do it this way.) This would add a measure of safety since gravity would work together with the locking mechanism to keep the battery in place.

Once I get back on the road, I am going to use a couple of velcro straps to augment the locking mechanism to make sure that, if the battery drops out of place, at least it won’t smash against the pavement.

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Ouch! Thanks for tactfully sharing your difficult situation Yossi, that sucks. I didn’t drop any batteries during my tests but I did feel that the interface was overly complex. You have that slider lever and a keyed locking core… I noticed that I did not have to lock the key in order to mate the battery, and this would let people potentially just unlock and take the battery (or maybe allow it to clunk out easier as in your situation). The charging port cover is also a bit finicky. Definitely room for improvement… but it looks like Bosch is also going for the under-mount approach with their upcoming Powertube design. For me, it’s difficult to bend down and pull the battery out this way vs. lifting up. So yeah, I like how Specialized did it with their Turbo Vado which also uses a Brose drive system. I guess Brose allows each manufacturer to set their battery up however they want.

Reply
Yossi Geretz
3 months ago

In all fairness, I should mention that the question of warrantee isn’t entirely up to the dealer. The dealer is a nice guy, and he’s trying to work it out but given the fact that the case is a bit banged up, he doesn’t feel that there is any chance of getting the manufacturer to honor the warrantee. That being said, the dealer is trying to work with me, to revive this battery, either with assistance from the manufacturer, perhaps they’ll recondition the battery for me for a fee, or as a last resort, perhaps we’ll open the case ourselves and hopefully find some loose connection which can be easily fixed. If anyone wants a good dealer in the Hudson Valley area I could name him, but I don’t know if you allow that level of blatant commercial ‘advertising’ on this forum?

Anyway, the hit to the battery stings, but I am having tons of fun on this bike. (I am mobile again because I had already ordered a spare so that I can do centuries.) I would encourage Bulls to tighten up the engineering of the locking mechanism to prevent activation unless the battery is firmly locked into place. This would be a low-tech mechanical solution with a huge bang for the buck for consumers.

Yossi Geretz
3 months ago

Just a follow-up to say that I’m getting ‘radio silence’ from both the dealer and the manufacturer on the question of whether I can get the battery replaced under warrantee or at least repaired. It was all smiles when I was shelling out the $4,500 for the bike and the extra battery but where’s the support???

Disappointed.

Reply
Court Rye
3 months ago

Hmm, that’s a bummer Yossi, maybe Bulls will reply or be more available to help now that Eurobike and Interbike have ended. Try reaching out again, some dealers even go to these events and can get distracted. I just got back myself and have been behind on emails

Reply

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KidWok
3 days ago

Got my ST1 LE 19 months ago and have put on 6k miles so far. Last year was the wettest year on record in Seattle for quite some time. It was pretty obvious that the fenders wouldn't be long enough so I added mud flaps, as I have many times before on road and commuter bikes. I quickly discovered that speed pedelacs kicked up the water fast enough that the water stream atomized on contact with the mud flap. Over the last year, I've revised my mud flap design multiple times and now have one I'm really happy with. Here's how they evolved:

Version 1: Used the long side of an orange Tide laundry bottle and attached it to black plastic fender plug with two M4 bolts and lock nuts. As noted, high speed water spray atomized on contact, enveloping feet and drive train in a fine mist that flushed the lube out of the chain after any short amount of time on wet pavement.

Version 2: First tried folding the flap so that water impacted at an angle, which didn't noticeably help. Then drilled some holes to add a series of vertical strings (chalk line) along the inside of the flap. The idea was for the strings to wick the water down, which helped a little. This assembly started getting heavy and version two ultimately disappeared when the black plastic fender plug fell off mid-ride.

Version 3: Stromer sent me another plug. The plug has a small hole in it, presumably for water to not collect in the fender cavity. I drilled a 1/8th inch hole just above that on the inside of the aluminum fender so that I can run a small zip tie to make sure the plug is firmly attached (picture attached...you can barely see the pink zip tie covered in road crud). This time I also wanted to lengthen the flap so I used an old water bottle (LDPE) and the long section of another detergent bottle zip tied together, mostly because the orange looks good with the blue on the LE. This worked fairly successfully for some time, but the wind eventually blew back the flap so that it was flying almost horizontally. That actually was fine because it was enough to protect the drive train and I had started commuting in Hunter Chelsea rain boots. However, the LDPE bottle was repeatedly creased where it attached to the plug and eventually broke off mid-ride. The plug stayed put thanks to the zip tie.

Version 4: Now I'm using two halves of the water bottle (LDPE) for the top, connected to both inside and outside of fender plug. This creates a very rigid top half that keeps the lower flap in line with the fender. Played with various materials and have found that HDPE from a gallon vinegar bottle is light, durable, and flexible enough to be scraped and knocked around. Middle section of vinegar bottle where label is attached yields two flaps, but at this time I'm still only running a front flap because I don't care about spraying behind on my commute. In addition to vertical lines, I've now added a pair of zip ties horizontally in the middle of the lower HDPE section, which holds the curvature of the flap and elevates the lines off the plastic. This dramatically reduces the amount of mist at high speed as it seems the gap between the lines and the plastic create a pocket for the disrupted/decelerated spray to mix with any remaining mist and exit downward. Version 4 pic attached.

Version 5: Needed a flap for the rear due to towing my son around on a trail-a-bike, so I took another LDPE bottle and the other half of the HDPE to make another flap. Once more, the flap is attached to the fender plug with two M4 bolts and the plug is zip tied on to the fender body. Having realized that a large gap between the strings and the plastic lower flap greatly reduces mist, I decided to run the strings horizontally with holes drilled along the side edges, instead of vertically as before. This serves to both hold the flap in a eye pleasing parabolic curve and maximized the de-misting pocket. Am now running version 4 on front and version 5 on rear. Version 4, with its vertical endpoints at the bottom of the flap has always collected a bunch of leaves, dead worms, etc. Version 5 clearly stays cleaner and does a better job eliminating mist. I ran out of vinegar again today, so the front flap has now been updated as well (pictures attached).

This has been a fun design challenge and I hope it helps other speed pedelac owners get the most out of their bikes year-round.

Tai

1/4
trebor
7 days ago

The Atom seems more advanced, but it would come down to the handling and how the geometry felt.

Some others to look at:

BULLS E-CORE EVO AM (same E8000 motor as Focus Jam2, but twice the battery capacity).

BULLS E-STREAM EVO AM4 (in case Brose-S motor is preferred).

trebor
1 week ago

I didn't buy one yet. Now I am thinking that I want dual suspension, 650B+ tires, 140mm tor more of suspension travel, and Brose-S or STEPS. Turbo Levo battery is getting to be small - 504 at most and 460 for models below Comp. The 2018 Bulls E-Cores are 750 with STEPS motors. The model AM or TR2 looks like what I want. Or if I like the Brose feel more, then the E-STREAM EVO AM4 or AM3. Or Maybe AtomX Lynx 6.

DaveF
2 weeks ago

I'm new to e-bikes this summer with the purchase of a Bulls E-stream EVO FS 3 29. I spend 90% of my riding time in the Post Canyon area enjoying the amazing trail networks. The principle motivation for this purchase was to use an e-MTB for knee replacement rehab, AKA e-hab. I get a workout that definitely helps with range of motion, building leg strength, and cardio at a level I can dial in. The trails are now accessible , even the steepest long grinds with my friends and family.

I joined this forum to learn as much as possible about the maintenance and use of my e-bike. I wish there was more online support for my bike. Also, would like to see apps that perform debug and operational mods for the drive system.

Updates for my bike include: a dropper seat post, updated flat peddles, tubeless tires, and grips.

bob armani
2 weeks ago

My new 2017 E-Stream Evo 45 FS.

Hello Mark-Love the BULLS! Is it easy to hit the top speed of 28mph while riding with your speed pedelec? I wanted to test ride this year at the Expo, however, I was told the bike was in for repairs at that time. Does it perform well at those speeds? Enjoy!

Rudder
3 weeks ago

Siganberg, I've been looking at lots of photos of the E-Stream Evo FS3 27.5 Plus, trying to see if others have the kickstand mounting point built in to the chainstay just forward of the rear axle on the left side. Most I've seen online do not have it. My bike is a 2017 (black/red color) and came new with the small rectangle block and two threaded holes built into the chainstay there. It's welded (heli-arced into it ). It fits the Felt Massload CL-KA89 kickstand. If you don't have it on yours there's probably a kickstand that can be fitted, but I don't know which one.

Siganberg
3 weeks ago

Just got my FS 3 and wanted to add kickstand too. Do you have some pics how did you installed that stand. Did you add some clamp?

Love the bike though. It's my 2nd ebike. My other is juiced bike I used as commuter.

I'm using a Felt Massload CL-KA89 kickstand on my Bulls E-Stream Evo FS 3 27.5 Plus.
I think it's made to fit on Felt Lebowske or Outfitter bikes. ($24)
It requires the 2 threaded mounting points built into the frame just forward of rear axle.
http://www.feltb2b.com/kickstand-massload-lebowske-cl-ka89-outfitter-9000265

Mark Wyvratt
3 weeks ago

My new 2017 E-Stream Evo 45 FS.

1/3
Hanz
1 month ago

Just ordered my new Bulls E-stream Evo 45 fs. Should be in by next week. Winter is coming but I just cannot wait

1/1
Ken M
1 month ago

My wife and I were riding our ebikes around Venice, FL this weekend and ran into another couple riding regular beach cruiser type bikes. They were pretty much tired out from riding their bikes in the heat and humidity and were really interested in our ebikes until they asked the price. We have inexpensive bikes, but when I told them that one cost about $1,200 and the other was about $2,800 they lost all interest, and were pointing out that they purchased theirs at a local bike shop for about $300 each. This is a pretty wealthy little town and the couple we were talking to live up North and have a vacation home on the beach here, so we're not talking about people who don't have money to buy an ebike- but from what I can tell as long as people in the US regard bikes as toys and not real transportation there is going to be a very limited number of buyers of ebikes that cost in the thousands, just as there are very few buyers of multi-thousand dollar non-powered bikes. Obviously many people in a specialized forum such as this may feel differently, but there is a reason why almost all bikes being sold are in the lower price ranges.
I think you have a good point on how an eBike is perceived - just a fun toy or a serious form of transportation. This summer I started riding to work as much as possible which is about a 25 mile round trip. I actually bought a $500 eBike originally and learned very quickly it was not up to the task of being a serious urban commute bike (it was great for riding around the neighborhood but not much else). Personally I think the trend towards Class 1-3 eBikes (ie basically legislation to allow DMV and insurance companies to ruin the industry because they will not establish long term reasonable rates) will hurt the adoption of eBikes as a serious form of transportation. It makes sense to have speed limits on paths where differentials of bike speeds may increase risks, but when someone is on a 60lb eBike on the street they are far less safe if they are limited to assist speeds of 20 or 28mph. It's no wonder that most serious commuters are finding way to de-restrict the speed controls on their eBikes. Anyone that thinks the police have the time or the equipment to check the power of every eBike motor or it's speed capability is probably someone working at DMV or an insurance company wanting some revenue stream from eBikes and will never ride one.

Hanz
1 month ago

I currently have a radrover fatbike I love. Also thinking about getting a Bulls E-Stream Evo 45 FS. A LBS near Pittsburgh will have a demo next week. Looking for real world pros and cons. I read all the reviews I could find. Any opinions greatly appreciated.

1/1
schole
2 months ago

Looking for a full-suspension mtb that is a speed pedelec (class 3). For example, Bulls E-Stream Evo 45 FS. Are there others?

Thanks in advance

MLB
2 months ago

You don't like working harder, but you're doing it. As YOU get stronger, the bike will too. At least in terms of giving you more boost. What you are experiencing is what I like about mid drives with good torque sensors, you have to work for the boost. Mid drives are the smallest motors used for ebikes. Good torque but the smallest hp (hp is speed, torque is climbing ability)
Yes my hub motored bikes are faster and give more boost easier. (all brands)
But I spend 90% of my rides on the mid drive because it's much more like riding a bike. ;)
My Haibike (and all others I've heard discussed that aren't speed pedalec) cuts out at 19mph and that's annoying, so I feel you on the 18mph and I don't know WHY that is when it's all digital....

To add to this, I have had an e-motion 650b for 2 years (30 speed), and love it, but off road the rear hub motor just can't cut it. So I just bought a 2016 Bulls E-Stream EVO FS 3 29er (22 speed) with Brose for $3,099 (big sale!). I've seen tons of reviews about how good the Brose motor is. I road it on a 20 mile bike ride with some hills and was not impressed. A little background, I have an ICD, and heart disease (from a virus), but I'm not too much of a slouch for a 52 year old. Anyway, on the 650B I cruise around usually on eco mode with my son at 12-15, or solo on boost and cruse at 20-23. I get a good workout, but it doesn't kill me.

With the Brose (updated) 4 power levels, on high, or any level, the basic work I have to put in to just trigger any assistance is very high for me, on top of that power cuts out at 18 MPH, that is a big difference compared with 21 MPH. So I go slower and work harder, alot harder. My average BPM was about 130 on the 650B at 20 MPH, where the Brose is more like 140-150 at 18 MPH. Be aware it didn't matter if I was going 18, or 14, the effort appeared the same. It's not all is bad with the Brose, I peddled up a very steep canal embankment in the lowest gear that I would never make with the 650B.

I thought I would sell the 650B, but I guess not. The Brose seem good for only tight off road in low gears. So I can re-live my youth on trails I use to do with my 1995 IBOC (no shocks at all). I plan on doing everything I can to modify the Brose top speed, not happy it's cutting out 2 MPH before 20.

Larry Ganz
2 months ago

To add to this, I have had an e-motion 650b for 2 years (30 speed), and love it, but off road the rear hub motor just can't cut it. So I just bought a 2016 Bulls E-Stream EVO FS 3 29er (22 speed) with Brose for $3,099 (big sale!). I've seen tons of reviews about how good the Brose motor is. I road it on a 20 mile bike ride with some hills and was not impressed. A little background, I have an ICD, and heart disease (from a virus), but I'm not too much of a slouch for a 52 year old. Anyway, on the 650B I cruise around usually on eco mode with my son at 12-15, or solo on boost and cruse at 20-23. I get a good workout, but it doesn't kill me.

With the Brose (updated) 4 power levels, on high, or any level, the basic work I have to put in to just trigger any assistance is very high for me, on top of that power cuts out at 18 MPH, that is a big difference compared with 21 MPH. So I go slower and work harder, alot harder. My average BPM was about 130 on the 650B at 20 MPH, where the Brose is more like 140-150 at 18 MPH. Be aware it didn't matter if I was going 18, or 14, the effort appeared the same. It's not all is bad with the Brose, I peddled up a very steep canal embankment in the lowest gear that I would never make with the 650B.

I thought I would sell the 650B, but I guess not. The Brose seem good for only tight off road in low gears. So I can re-live my youth on trails I use to do with my 1995 IBOC (no shocks at all). I plan on doing everything I can to modify the Brose top speed, not happy it's cutting out 2 MPH before 20.

Check and see if you can have the bike shop reprogram the computer? Also, check if there is a setting for changing the wheel diameter or the tire circumference, and if it has that then changing it could let you travel a little faster, even if the programming thinks it's cutting out at 18mph you'd really be doing 20.

FooDoDaddy
2 months ago

To add to this, I have had an e-motion 650b for 2 years (30 speed), and love it, but off road the rear hub motor just can't cut it. So I just bought a 2016 Bulls E-Stream EVO FS 3 29er (22 speed) with Brose for $3,099 (big sale!). I've seen tons of reviews about how good the Brose motor is. I road it on a 20 mile bike ride with some hills and was not impressed. A little background, I have an ICD, and heart disease (from a virus), but I'm not too much of a slouch for a 52 year old. Anyway, on the 650B I cruise around usually on eco mode with my son at 12-15, or solo on boost and cruse at 20-23. I get a good workout, but it doesn't kill me.

With the Brose (updated) 4 power levels, on high, or any level, the basic work I have to put in to just trigger any assistance is very high for me, on top of that power cuts out at 18 MPH, that is a big difference compared with 21 MPH. So I go slower and work harder, alot harder. My average BPM was about 130 on the 650B at 20 MPH, where the Brose is more like 140-150 at 18 MPH. Be aware it didn't matter if I was going 18, or 14, the effort appeared the same. It's not all is bad with the Brose, I peddled up a very steep canal embankment in the lowest gear that I would never make with the 650B.

I thought I would sell the 650B, but I guess not. The Brose seem good for only tight off road in low gears. So I can re-live my youth on trails I use to do with my 1995 IBOC (no shocks at all). I plan on doing everything I can to modify the Brose top speed, not happy it's cutting out 2 MPH before 20.

Rudder
3 months ago

I'm using a Felt Massload CL-KA89 kickstand on my Bulls E-Stream Evo FS 3 27.5 Plus.
I think it's made to fit on Felt Lebowske or Outfitter bikes. ($24)
It requires the 2 threaded mounting points built into the frame just forward of rear axle.
http://www.feltb2b.com/kickstand-massload-lebowske-cl-ka89-outfitter-9000265

Rudder
3 months ago

I have a 49 cm frame and want to add a Dropper Seat Post Which ones fit easily, works well, and lasts a long time? My comfortable seat rail height is 195 mm above the bottom of the seat post clamp. I pushed the seat post down the seat tube and it bottoms out after accepting 238mm of it.
Has anyone installed one?

Steve Pierce
3 months ago

Just received a new 2016 Bulls 27.5 ebike from SanDiegoFlyRides last Friday. Shipping only took a week and the bike arrived with just very minor damage. Front disk rotor was slightly bent and a couple of small dings to the paint job but overall in good shape. Thanks for the fast delivery.
The bike looks to be of very high quality. I weigh about 265 and was concerned with the suspension holding enough air pressure. Had to pump up the rear RockShox to 300 psi to get the right amount of sag. Seems to be holding the pressure. The ride is very plush. The drive system will get you to 20mph in a hurry. I have to get used to that because I ended up flying down a tight trail way too fast. 20mph through trees and winding trails is pretty intimidating. The battery is huge and well hidden in the frame. After riding for 2 hours, the battery indicator had only dropped one bar.
I am very please with this bike overall. It feels and looks like a serious mountain bike.
Very good price drop on the 2016 models also.

Steve

Over50
3 months ago

I just stumbled upon the new reise and muller supercharger. It seem to have the distance I am looking for with the new dual battery setup built into the frame for the main stream look. Just wandering about the Gates belt drive setup and its reliability...Anyone list some pros and cons on any of these setups. Also the supercharger already comes with fox front suspension forks.
I'm a big fan of the belt drive. I have it on the Charger and on my human powered bike (Spot bike with Shimano Alfine hub). So far they have been very reliable and it eliminates a lot of maintenance. What I'm becoming less of a fan of is the Nuvinci hub that comes with the belt drive bikes for R&M. At least in my case, the Nuvinci leaves me wanting a bit more gear range. While it is simple to use and so far reliable, if I were making my purchase decision again I might reconsider the Nuvinci version and select the chain driven Shimano 11 speed (Rohloff would be overkill for my flat terrain use). I kinda wish R&M would offer a belt drive version with the Shimano Alfine 11 speed IGH. Seems like that would be a good option for someone like me who prefers an IGH paired with a carbon belt but who really doesn't care for the Nuvinci.

RookieCommuter
3 months ago

I just stumbled upon the new reise and muller supercharger. It seem to have the distance I am looking for with the new dual battery setup built into the frame for the main stream look. Just wandering about the Gates belt drive setup and its reliability. The down side is it doesn't come out till December. The plus side is the price compared to the st2. Also with the St5 coming out theres a lot to think over. Anyone list some pros and cons on any of these setups. Also the supercharger already comes with fox front suspension forks.

Fran Fabrizio
3 months ago

I think it's pretty apparent at this point that they did not expect to sell out the entire first container as pre-orders. All the language they had on their site during the pre-order period and all that has happened since points to this. They said that all pre-orders would arrive late August and ship soon thereafter, and that all pre-orders would have the upgraded brakes. Clearly they were expecting that pre-orders would only be a fraction of that first shipment. Oops. Growing pains. Will be interesting to see if the company learns from this, which will be shown both in how they handle rollouts of future generations of bikes but also in how they treat those of us who do not have our bikes yet and feel excluded from the brake upgrade that was described.

There's some business 101 going on here. They have a product and price point that has generated high demand and currently has little competition in the market. This is why we're all willing to put up with the headaches - because we want the bike we've decided is the right bike for us and there's nowhere else to go get it at this price. So that's opened an opportunity where a company can currently do things like work connections in China and do some thoughtful design and sourcing of parts and put together a compelling bike package that seriously undercuts the competitor's pricing and entices people to pre-order and be early adopters. That gap will close, it always does - e-bikes will continue to get more popular, tech will get better, part prices will come down as manufacturing increases, and that market opportunity will be harder and harder to exploit. Of course there are companies right now looking at the CrossCurrent S and figuring out how can I assemble that cheaper or build a better bike for the same price? They'll eventually figure it out, then Juiced will need to either have to find a different, less mature segment of the market to attack, or find other ways to differentiate themselves.

This is where good customer service now could pay dividends later. As consumers that's what would make us loyal repeat buyers. On the other hand, it could be a perfectly valid business plan to decide that generating repeat buyers is not a priority and that they're always going to look to ride that wave of bringing the first truly affordable well-spec'ed bikes to different segments of the e-bike market, or some other market altogether, such that they aren't competing with many other products in the marketplace and therefore they will continue to have a customer stream. As a company, they have limited resources and although of course most companies want to do well in all aspects of their business, these niche companies in immature markets rarely have the resources and experience to pull it all off, so they play to their strengths (which in Juiced's case is clearly on the design side). As consumers, we of course want it all - great designs at a great price with great customer service sooner than everyone else. There are very few companies who figure out how to do that well consistently while in immature markets. Once things become more commodity it's relatively easier to do that, and you see lots of market consolidation at that point. There are way too many small e-bike companies right now - the marketplace will work itself out and it will be interesting to observe how that plays out over the next several years.

RookieCommuter
3 months ago

Hello everyone. New to ebikes/bikes in general other then having them as a kid. I have done a lot of research and looking at several different brands. The two in particular is the optibike pioneer carbon and stromer st2. So lets start by my specs and purpose for the bike. I am a 5'5 male 160 lbs. Not very active due to the busyness of life. I live in Atlanta and due to the new beltline being built and traffic in the city I really want to "ditch" the car as much as possible and commute by bike. Using the bike as my main transportation.

With that being said most of my biking will be within 24-30 miles max round trip of my house. With that being said I don't want to be limited as I get in better shape with going further. Also we have hot summers and not looking to be soaked in sweat when I get where I am going (work, grocery store, out on town, etc).

I want maximum range, comfort, handling, exceptional quality built. So I have come down the stromer st2 and optibike. Heres the aftermarket parts I am looking to pair with the bike to achieve desired outcome. The Kinekt seat posts and fox suspensions forks. From what I have read these upgrades will make a world of difference. What I like most about the pioneer carbon is the weight, thumb throttle, and I can buy a extra battery to achieve the same max distance as the st2. The biggest pro about the stromer is the reputation they seem to have as being the best built bike on the market.

Open to other brands also but really like that both of these have a appearance of just a beefier main stream bike. Lets hear some opinions. I am here to learn.

Kathy Smith
3 months ago

OK. We all have our riding styles. My wife never shifts hears either althoughshe learned to drive on a 4 speed Ford. A hub motor may fit you better, and my thinking is a geared unit is good for non-shifting. However, the small wheel on a 20" is like a lower gear too. Limits top speed, but easier for starts and hills.

The US laws, such as they are, and restrictive Euro policy on throttles have made it difficult for main stream bike makers to build models that can be sold in either market, so we do see more throttle-less ebikes here.

If you remove the battery on some of the heavier bikes, they might meet your weight limits for carrying upstairs. Keep looking.
Yes, I'll keep looking...

harryS
3 months ago

OK. We all have our riding styles. My wife never shifts hears either althoughshe learned to drive on a 4 speed Ford. A hub motor may fit you better, and my thinking is a geared unit is good for non-shifting. However, the small wheel on a 20" is like a lower gear too. Limits top speed, but easier for starts and hills.

The US laws, such as they are, and restrictive Euro policy on throttles have made it difficult for main stream bike makers to build models that can be sold in either market, so we do see more throttle-less ebikes here.

If you remove the battery on some of the heavier bikes, they might meet your weight limits for carrying upstairs. Keep looking.

VIEJO LEMURO LOCO
1 month ago

i like the noise on the ebike why is it some are bothered by it?

DiGiTaLGrAvEDiGGA
4 months ago

for the price tag, they should of went with a Yamaha or Bosch motor!

SushiGammon
5 months ago

is it really 54 pounds

david purcell
9 months ago

I really love your Chanel, comprehensive knowledgeable reviews, thanks 👍

Dark Templar
10 months ago

@ElectricBikeReview.com
Do you know what the Firmware Version of the MCU was? (like 4.0.1?) and what the Motorsetup version it had (like MTB3E4).
I have those versions above and i'm looking to find the difference: Mine is set up in kmh and has a limit of 25kmh. I would like to find out if I can set my bike up with the US-Version im mph with a limit of 20.

Joe Blogs
11 months ago

you have to take your hat off to brose they have the best integration of battery and motor. its hard to tell its a ebike

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

Bulls did a really good job with that!

Bob A
11 months ago

Court-Outstanding review! Love BULLS bikes. Looks like this is a better buy compared to the Levo you mentioned at a much better price point. I think you are getting more bang for your buck being the Levo is more in the $7500 dollar range. Do you agree? Also, when you are riding at this location, it looks like you are getting awful close to the cliff drop off, or am I being too critical concerning your safety? Be careful Court!!

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

Court actually has the Levo. We spoke a bit about this. I think you might pay a slight premium for the Specialized brand. I think the Bulls might be a slightly better value if you were to compare specs.

250 watts
11 months ago

Beautiful looking bike.

Chris topher
11 months ago

I like the new steady cam rather than strapping the camera to the bike.

Mole Js
11 months ago

hi court,where is the trailhead located for this nice place?

Laurentiu Dobjanski
11 months ago

Fumos, foarte frumos. Beautiful, very beautiful.

Fabian Winkler
11 months ago

It seems you need a bell for crowd control

Festivejelly
11 months ago

I like the look of this one. Quite a bit pricey mind compared to what companies like Haibike can offer. Though I prefer the look of this one over the Haibikes. I have a AllMtn SL which was around £2700, which is quite a lot cheaper than this one. It too has 150 mm of travel, though I suspect the components arnt as good "quality".

Ted Kidd
11 months ago

Pretty good reviews but always talks a LONG time before riding.

Seb K
11 months ago

Nah a hub motor has more torque and being directly part of the wheel means it is more hidden .

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

In my opinion nothing beats mid drives for off-road though. A mid drive will give you much more control and you have the mechanical advantage of using the bikes drivetrain.

Deivydas G.
11 months ago

i would understand if you say no but i would like to see a review of life electric bmx

slappy76
11 months ago

Court, your are a video review churning machine! Keep up the great work. I really enjoy hearing your input on e-bikes. Please keep the 2017 Raleigh Redux IE (also with the Brose) on your list of bikes to test ride. I don't think dealers have them in stock yet. But their price point is a little easier to stomach than $4500+ on these Bulls.

BTW you filmed right next to our firehouse when you were in Brooklyn. Stop by and say hi next time you're in the hood. ;)

Bob A
11 months ago

wow nice bike slappy76, but it is a hardtail with no front end shock. Looks like you could add a rock shock and a thudbuster if needed.

Robert Groves
11 months ago

Court, are you going to do a review on the other Bulls bike you mentioned in this video? I heard you say it shares a lot of the same components as the EVO FS 3 27.5 but its a speed pedelec. I love the design and over all look of these Bulls bikes and how well they integrate the battery. I know I've said this many times before BUT I really wish these bikes had a throttle and the ability to hit 30+ mph. I need a bike to fit ALL my needs and this bike has that potential.... Bulls should offer these features as an option, I'm certain they can do it. As always, another good review. I appreciate your detailed reviews.

G Henrickson
5 months ago

Robert, maybe you should make such mods. to your own Bulls ebike. Most likely propel and others have already done this but its not feasible to bring it to market. Too many issues, after all this is America, the land of litigation.

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

We've had these sort of requests before, but we're not going to do that. I think overtime we might see more throttle activated bikes like that, but their going to need to be registered as mopeds in most jurisdictions.

Robert Groves
11 months ago

The bike looks AWESOME ! How about you guys at Propel do some creative engineering and put a throttle on the bike and get it to do 30+ in throttle mode.

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

I believe this one is coming as well. I think Court reviewed it already he's just working on editing everything. I think that bike is awesome!

Bob A
11 months ago

I agree with you on all Robert. I wish Bulls would consider that as well. If so, I am a sure buyer of this bike.

Karl Fonner
11 months ago

Where can I get one in the Northern California bay area

jeremy scarsone
9 months ago

Propel Electric Bikes where is the nearest place to Buffalo to get a bulls bike?

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

I think Motostrano is a dealer for Bulls.

jc hg
11 months ago

Super nice bike, I have this model and it is amazing

Propel Electric Bikes
11 months ago

I've seen these issues on some dropper posts. Sometimes it's improper setup, but there are definitely are some defective posts out there. The tolerances are super tight on these things.

Bob A
11 months ago

Okay JC thanks. that is an awesome bike! Where do you ride, only off road?

jc hg
11 months ago

Hi Bob, to tell you the truth I have never tried to move it to the most down position. I will try and tell you.
Thanks for your comments.

Bob A
11 months ago

Hi JC- Are you having any issues with the seat post movement? Last year's model seemed to have this engineering flaw. It was not moving freely to the most down position.Just curious. Enjoy your BULLS!!